labrador retriever holes

Discussion in 'Dog Health Care' started by deepaksikkanthar, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. deepaksikkanthar

    deepaksikkanthar New Member

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    my dog noddy is eight months old . he suddenly had diarrhea and started losing one vet who i took him to said he is fine and gave some injection . his conditioned worsened he became really week and started drooling and stopped eating . i took him to another vet who gave some medicines and after the medicines noddy became alright . but she checked the anus and said because of the prolonged wetness there is a hole and gave some spray and ointment to prevent maggot infection . now today when i was gioving the medicines i checked his mouth and found out same kind of hole his lips . what could be the problem .please soemone help me and am sorry for the long post .
     
  2. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    Do you have a picture of either end ?? Something sounds fishy .
     
  3. LoveNewfies

    LoveNewfies New Member

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    That does sound odd - pictures would be helpful as well as what the vet actually diagnosed and the medications given.
     
  4. deepaksikkanthar

    deepaksikkanthar New Member

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    am sorry i am not able to post pictures because i dont have a digital camera and my camera phone is in service centre . i examined the holes today and took out live maggots out of it . now what can i do to get rid of them completely . they are jus holes no dead tuissues or darkened area around them .
     
  5. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    Maggots live off of rotten tissue !!!! VET!!!!
     
  6. deepaksikkanthar

    deepaksikkanthar New Member

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    but saw in the net they do feed on living tissues . what if they eat into his internal organs ?
     
  7. CanadianK9

    CanadianK9 Active Member

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    Id have another opinion taken

    Maggots dont eat living tissue, they only consume dead tissue, there sounds like something is very wrong here. Go see a different vet immediately
     
  8. deepaksikkanthar

    deepaksikkanthar New Member

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    Myiasis is a the term used to describe a maggot infestation. Maggots are fly larva that feed on necrotic and dying tissue. Especially prone are those pets confined to the outdoors with situations in which their skin remains moist. This includes pets with draining wounds, urine or fecal stained hair coats, or bacterial skin infections. Sustained skin moisture can cause damage, inflammation and infection setting up a favorable environment for maggots. This applies especially to weak and debilitated pets.

    As with fleas and ticks, maggots can be a threat to household pets. Flies reproduce rapidly in the summer months and maggots can come in large numbers, creating a maggot infestation and a high risk of myiasis in pets. Despite the fact that most maggots only eat dead tissue, some maggots, such as certain botfly larvae, spend part of their lifecycle as parasites under the skin of living animals. They can be painful and present a serious risk to pets or any other animals. Humans are not immune to the feeding habits of maggots and can also contract myiasis. Interaction between humans and maggots usually occurs near garbage cans, dead animals, rotten food, and other breeding grounds for maggots.
     
  9. MafiaPrincess

    MafiaPrincess Obvious trollsare Obvious

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    So by posting that you are making excuses as to why it's fine to have maggots living on your dog. Either vet it or stop posting about it. None of us are vets. Sounds like you need one.
     
  10. CanadianK9

    CanadianK9 Active Member

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    So if you have had it properly diagnosed and are treating it the way that has been identified and prescribed by your vet, a recognized DVM, why are you asking what is wrong? Do you not believe your vet has made a proper diagnosis and prescribing?

    And in addition the maggot species that does eat living tissue is described as forming in mainly rancid conditions. Do you know when or where these conditions came from? identifying the source is usually the best step to the answer.
     
  11. nancy2394

    nancy2394 New Member

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    Definately get another opinion... something is not right. Someone already stated that maggots only eat dead tissue. If your dog has necrotic tissue forming .... something is WRONG. You need to get this checked out... it could lead to a massive infectinon and death could be the result.
     
  12. CanadianK9

    CanadianK9 Active Member

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    And just to add, have you been properly briefed on what is going to be done about the situation you have?
     
  13. GlassOnion

    GlassOnion Thanks, and Gig 'em.

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    Yah maggots are definitely something you need to see the vet about. They won't eat into his organs but still, you should see a vet.

    We had a cat come in once that had a hole, about a half inch in diameter, that had maggots falling out of it (yes, falling out of the hole, sickest thing I've ever seen) but the cat was OK after we cleaned away the dead tissue and patched up the hole.

    So, yes, vet time.
     
  14. houndlove

    houndlove coonhound crazy

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    Okay seriously, if my dog had HOLES in him and I was pulling maggots out of said holes, I would be in a car on my way to the emergency vet so fast it would make your head spin (after I got done puking because that is just disgusting). Even if it is one of the few bug larvae that will eat living tissue: BUGS ARE LIVING ON YOUR DOG! Do something about that! It is not in any way normal and the common name of all creatures that live off other living creatures is parasites.

    If the first vet you went to won't tell you what is going on and how you can stop what is happening (though that makes my mind boggle just in and of itself), find one who will.
     
  15. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    Anyone else beginning to think that these maggots are living off :spam: ??
     
  16. Jean Luc Picardy

    Jean Luc Picardy New Member

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    That to me was never in doubt.
     
  17. deepaksikkanthar

    deepaksikkanthar New Member

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    you people think that i am fine with my dog having holes . i spent the last two nights without a bit of sleep . as i have said in my first post my dog had diarrhea for a month which it was treated for . because of the diarrhea and drooling there couldve been dead tissues . and yea about the vet for your information i take my pets to the vet even if i see the slightest of discomfort in them . noddy is was given medicine for both his diarrhea and infection .

    here is the prescription he is under

    tab bayroxin
    tab normetrogyl
    stibs powder

    tab zinetac

    tab dremectin

    t - bact ointment
    siloderm ointment
    clamil spray


    and i took out all the remaining maggots myself yesterday and today and took him to the vet . i just posted here for a second opinion . people here can think twice before hurting someone .

    and ya dexorange for iron and caldipet are the two vitamins i forgot to add .
     
  18. goldiefur

    goldiefur New Member

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    Could this poster be talking about wolf worm?
     
  19. goldiefur

    goldiefur New Member

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    I found this http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_you_treat_wolf_worm_in_dog it is not much info but this could be what is going on. I have heard of this before but I don't really know where to get good info on it. I don't think this is very common but I think it is higher if you live in a hot climate. Growing up I was told not to keep a dog outside very long if they had an open wound because bugs or worms or whatever could get in. Keep your dog inside until he heals and contact a vet. It seems to me the vet would clean and remove these things/worms. My advice is vet, keep him clean and keep him inside.
     
  20. goldiefur

    goldiefur New Member

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