Lab energy level

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by maybe532, Nov 20, 2007.

  1. maybe532

    maybe532 New Member

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    Well, that sounds like I shouldn't discount it just yet. I'll try to find some Tollers in my area to see them firsthand. They are UKC, not AKC, right? I'll see if there are going to be any shows in my area.
    Thanks again for the info.
     
  2. Toller_08

    Toller_08 Active Member

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    They're recognized by both AKC & UKC now, actually. I'm glad you're not going to disclude them just yet. :)
     
  3. HarleyD

    HarleyD Guest

    :lol-sign: Who told you Labs have a "no fuss" coat??? That's a crock. You'll have hair all over your house and not even know til you check the corners. The throw their coat at about a year old and then some do it more often after that than others. You still have to brush and groom to get dead hair off so the shedding isn't as bad.

    The qualities you are looking for are dead on in Labs, so I'd stick with the Lab if I was you. All hunting bred dogs, regardless of if they show or not, are going to have pretty high energy levels. I know some people that have their Labs inside and for the most part they are quite and chilled out. They do get the zoomies and go barreling through the house chasing each other when they haven't been out for awhile though. They will also need 30 minute walks (minimum) each time you take them out to keep the energy level lower while inside. If you don't plan on keeping them inside, then don't bother getting a Lab. They are very family oriented and DO NOT do well outside or away from their family pack. The more they are seperated the more high energy, needy and jump uppy they will be.

    Walk 'em, play with 'em in water or with sticks/dummies and keep 'em occupied inside with simpler play and toys and you'll be fine. Make sure you train early on and include "come" early on. Sit and lay will be really easy for you...and probably shake. Stay is harder sometimes but can be done. Get them used to a leash early on and get heel down quickly otherwise you'll find yourself drug across the yard. You may want to get a body harness as well during those first few months of training.
     

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