How to train a dog "no"

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by Zen Fox, Jan 2, 2006.

  1. Zen Fox

    Zen Fox Foxxy fox rave

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    What's the best way to train a dog the meaning of no? Is it best to let them get in to something they shouldn't and then tell them, or present various stimuli like a pillow and then tell them no, while presenting an unrewarding object (a bad smell)? Is it possible to undergo this process without the undesirable stimulus?
     
  2. Mindy Miller

    Mindy Miller New Member

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    I wouldn't give him things and tell him no. That sounds confusing. With the dogs I've had, telling them no when they get into something and giving something that is okay and saying "good dog" or whatever has been successful. I've also puppy proofed my house so there aren't many opportunities to get into or do bad things. For example, I keep lots of chew toys out for my dog and keep things that might seem yummy put away (shoes, socks, etc.); we've never had a chewing problem. Still, 5-year-olds tend to leave crayons and such lying around. If she does get ahold of something and I say "No," she immediately puts it down. I give her something that's okay to play with. I try to look at it like I've got a toddler. Redirection works really well.
     
  3. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    No, no, no. LOL! It's better to teach your dog what is "good dog" than "no." If a dog hears, "no" all the time, he'll shut down and not be interested in learning. Distract your dog from unwanted behavior, make sure he's not able to get a reward for it (from you or self rewarding) and give him an alternative behavior that he can be praised for. For instance, if you don't want him to jump up on you, instead of saying, "no," ignore him, turn the other way, give NO attention whatsoever, like he's not even there. When he gets back on all fours, then praise and give attention. If you can intercept him just before he's about to jump, tell him, "sit." He can't jump if he's sitting. Then reward for that. Show him what you do want, what behavior gets him the reward (praise, treats) and what behavior gets him nothing. It doesn't get him punishment, but it doesn't get him anything worthwhile. He will soon figure out what the best choice is for him. Watch out for that sneaky "self rewarding" stuff. Sometimes it's hard to recognize. And watch that you don't inadvertantly reward by giving attention....good attention or bad.

    Keep things that you don't want your pup to get out of reach. Supervise a pup so he doesn't get your valuables. That is self rewarding. Keep the counters clear of food if he's a tall dog. Keep garbage put away. If he is never rewarded for those behaviors of getting those things, he'll learn sooner that there is no payoff in getting those things and a habit will not develop. Give plenty of exercise so the pup is a little tired and practice obedience skills using positive methods so your dog learns that you are the one who give directions and that it is a fun thing to do to obey you because it's always rewarding and never punishing. Pups need to learn how to live in a human world and it doesn't happen overnight. It's a process. Good luck.
     
  4. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Mindy...LOL. I must have been typing still when you posted. Good advice!

    Only difference is that I hardly ever say "no." I save that for emergencies. LOL. I love the "leave it" command. That one you can actively teach by putting some enticing objects out on your lawn and walking past with the dog on a leash. When he goes toward an enticing object, say, "leave it" and keep walking. The second he shows a loss of interest in the thing and complies by coming right along, praise with a very yummy treat...tidbit of hot dog works well. (make treats tiny) He will learn that "leave it" is a very rewarding thing to do. I use that for all kinds of things....great helpful command.
     
  5. Angelique

    Angelique New Member

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    I've noticed I use words a little differently than most people.

    "Good" - I get the dog to associate something that means "good" to them, first, before I use it to show I'm pleased with a behavior. An example would be, saying "good" when I'm scratching their bum or giving them something good to eat. I think they make a faster connection with the meaning of the word, as a positive association this way.

    "No" - is said in a soft voice, if I want to communicate they've chewed on something they aren't supposed to. An example would be taking the object away, making eye contact and say "This is nOo". No anger, yelling or intimidation. My dog will make an "embarassed face" when I do this. And then we move on, no big deal.

    "Eh-eh" and "hey" - boundry words. These means stop what you are doing, go no further, and get your attention on me. Again, no need to yell or punish with your voice. This is done to communicate, not intimidate.

    I don't use intimidation when I work with a dog. It's all about being a calm leader, making good decisions, and communicating what you want.

    Angelique the Strange :D
     
  6. Jynx

    Jynx New Member

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    I don't use the word "no",,I find it can be, as others have posted, nagging and after awhile they will just tune you out..I, as others, always accentuate on the positive behaviors, and work on teaching a good "leave it".

    diane
     
  7. As someone long ago, much wiser than I, said:

    The list of WHAT to do is much shorter than the list of what NOT to do.

    Teach positive commands.

    Leave it.
    Attention.
    Recall.
    Stay.
    Down.
    Off.
    Sit.

    Then you have a way to tell the dog WHAT to do, instead of what NOT to do.

    :D
     
  8. Gempress

    Gempress Walks into Mordor

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    I think I've seen this mentioned in the forums before, but I guess I just don't understand why you need to teach "no". I've never needed to teach any of my dogs "no". It's all in the tone of voice. If you say it in the right tone, your pup will know instantly that you disapprove.

    You don't need to teach your dog that a "happy voice" means approval. I don't see why you'd need to teach them that the "no voice" means disapproval. Just try adjusting your tone, and see what happens.
     

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