How to avoid clipper lines?

Discussion in 'Dog Grooming Forum' started by helen-rose, May 17, 2010.

  1. helen-rose

    helen-rose VP Dogs

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    Hi all, does anyone have any advice on how to avoid getting clipper lines in the coat when clippering very short? i always seem to have problems with this..I am using a professional clipper (Andis 2 speed) .:confused:
     
  2. Saintgirl

    Saintgirl New Member

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    First, you have to make sure that the coat is 100% DRY! If the coat is at all damp you will see lines. The other most common reason to see lines when clipping close is not following the hair pattern perfectly. The thicker the coat the easier it will be to make these lines, especially on a double coated breed (which I discourage shaving anyway). Practise will help, but go slow with LONG sweeps of the clipper making sure that you are following the curve of the fur pattern. What breeds are you typically seeing this problem on?
     
  3. helen-rose

    helen-rose VP Dogs

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    thanks for your advice, well i noticed it on a westie (normally westies I find really easy but this one had thick fur and his owner wanted him cut VERY short for summer and i found it hard not to get lines) Also I have just tried clipping my pug because he has very thick fur and he is getting very over-heated at the moment, but this made lots of clipper lines. maybe it is just because his coat is not suitable for clipping?? are there any short-haired breeds that get clipped normally?
     
  4. MandyPug

    MandyPug Sport Model Pug

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    I don't recommend shaving pugs at all. It can really do a number on the coat condition and pugs don't grow hair back very fast.

    The hair on a double coated breed not only insulates from the cold but it protects from the heat too. A shaved pug is not only more susceptible to sunburns, but will still be likely to overheat. Keeping your pug's weight down and providing them with a cool escape from the heat is the best plan, it's not their coat that overheats them it's their skin and fat, and their short face that doesn't allow panting to work properly.
     
  5. Giny

    Giny Active Member

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    I agree with what Saintgirl mentioned. And also add to check your blade, specifically the cutting/movable part. Make sure it's lined up straight, it can sometimes happen when you tighten up the top screws of the blade that it can off kilter the cutting blade, and if it is off kilter, by just a bit, can cause lines when clipping. Also, make sure to keep your clippers on an even pressure on the body while clipping.
     
  6. hyperloz

    hyperloz New Member

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    I've noticed that some coats always have clipper lines every time I clip them. Most frequently Westies, (which, I wouldn't recommend cutting VERY short as they can burn in the sun), some Cavalier King Charles', and spaniels. We've used all sorts of blades on some coats, and they mark no matter what. Just go over them with a bit more pressure than you usually would a couple of times, and it usually helps.

    XXxxLOZxxXX
     
  7. Crumbyuy

    Crumbyuy New Member

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    ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS pull your clipper away from the body when nearing the skirt line. Just barely pull it away from the body. DON'T EVER just stop, that leaves lines... Also like said above, remove as much undercoat as possible. I had to fix another groomers westie today because she didn't listen to how I told her (or showed her umpteen times) on how to do a Westie properly.

    You can also use thinning shears to help blend the skirt. I personally use the Furminator, the comb and the brush, pull the blade away, use thinning shears and never use anything shorter than a #4 blade. In some cases when the owner wants it shorter I do it, but I always warn them, that it's harder to blend.
     

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