How many litters?

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by noludoru, Oct 23, 2008.

  1. adojrts

    adojrts New Member

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    In my breed there are some studs that have produced well over 300 puppies.
    That doesn't seem like a lot when most Jrts whelp an average of 5 pups per litter but that puts the number of breedings per year up alot. And if those studs (which some have) been very prolific in a undesirable genetic flaw like cataracts etc (which of course hasn't been discovered until its too late or its a matter of breed and don't tell), it can be so very difficult for get away from those lines. Let alone trying to get away when those lines have also been heavily linebred.

    I am watching one of my litters like a hawk right now (they are 3 1/2 yrs old ), because although at the time the dam was CERF clear, she went completely blind at a young age (6 1/2), so if any of those pups become effected that means that my stud is a carrier for the cataract gene. If they remain CERF clear, then that is a huge bonus for me and my lines. So now it's a wait and see while continuing to CERF everyone as usual.
     
  2. Bahamutt99

    Bahamutt99 Dafuq?

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  3. corgi_love

    corgi_love New Member

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  4. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    I would think so. Some dogs' sperm may not be as viable as others which would result in fewer puppies.
     
  5. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    Trey's sire produced a TON of puppies. He was the top producing sire for two years and for several other years around was right up there (I know he was #2 an additional two years). Trey has 56 AKC Champion brothers and sisters out there and 21 CKC champion siblings (some overlap). Dillon ended up as the #5 ch producer of all time for the breed. I don't know how many siblings he has out there. I have run into many people online and found out their dog was my dog's half brother.

    Luckily Dillon was healthy and lived to be 14 years old. One problem I have nowadays is thinking back to if he'd had something wrong, the result could've been devastating. I also don't like that there was such an influential stud used that was purely renowned for producing champions. He had no performance titles, though Trey's mom was titled multiple times on both ends (both a CKC and AKC Ch and obedience and agility titles as well as being a fairly capable herder).
     
  6. YodelDogs

    YodelDogs New Member

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    One needs to look at how many of a particular breed are born each year to detemine the percentage of impact of a single dog in population genetics. Then one needs to look at how many offspring of said dog will be used for breeding. A stud who produces 100 puppies in a lifetime but only 10 of them are bred from will not contribute to the breeding gene pool any more than a stud who produces a grand total of 10 puppies who are all intact and bred from.
     

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