Hitting spanking slapping popping

Discussion in 'Dogs - General Dog Chat' started by Danefied, Oct 9, 2012.

  1. Danefied

    Danefied New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,722
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    One husband of 15 years
    Location:
    Southeast
    Rather than continually derail threads with this topic, how 'bout we hash it out? :D

    When is it okay, IS it ever okay to hit your dog?

    I admit it right now. I hit my dogs. I do it 99.9 percent of the time in play and 3 of the 4 are very rough and tumble and LOVE being smacked around. Bates also loves having his cheeks grabbed. I bite him too :D But not often because it suck to pick dog hair out from between your teeth.

    But I'd be lying if I said I've never gotten frustrated with one of my dogs to the point of jerking the leash or otherwise trying to physically retaliate. I'm not much of a hitter, but I think if I were, I would have. I imediately felt bad though and apologized to both the dog and myself for allowing things to get to that point.

    So I guess what I'm saying is I understand those moments of extreme frustration where we do things we regret. But does that make it okay?
     
  2. Pops2

    Pops2 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2008
    Messages:
    3,072
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    none
    Location:
    UT
    when the dog is commiting or about to commit an act which could result in death or serious injury of a person, the dog or another animal whose death or injury is NOT desirable, it is entirely acceptable to strike said dog in order to cause an immediate change in said dog's interest in the act.
     
  3. Locke

    Locke Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Messages:
    1,919
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I do not think it is ever okay unless you, other people, other animals are in danger.

    I definitely lost my temper and have done things I regret, but never felt "okay" about it.
     
  4. adojrts

    adojrts New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2006
    Messages:
    4,089
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    7
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    I think we have all been there and no it doesn't make it right. I am a 'cross over trainer', use to use some corrections, the alpha rolls, dominance etc because that is what we were taught. But I quickly got away from it, I didn't like the way my dogs were looking at me. I was annoyed with myself, I had spent my live working with horses and had figured out that being in conflict with didn't work. Had figured out that I got better results by teaching them what I wanted and using rewards. Called myself an idiot for following the dog training trends at the time and then changed it. :)
     
  5. eddieq

    eddieq Silence! I ban you! Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
    Messages:
    8,823
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    PA
    MOD HAT IN PLACE:

    Based on how the other threads went, I'm going to say this now rather than later. This is the only warning we'll issue in this thread. It's a great topic for discussion. If it degenerates into name calling or other rules violations, the guilty parties will be "spanked" appropriately.
     
  6. OwnedByBCs

    OwnedByBCs Will Creep For Sheep

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    588
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    5
    Location:
    Colorado
    Home Page:
    Yeah, I agree with Locke. I don't think it's acceptable in average situations, but I've done it and regretted it every second. I think when it gets to the point that physical confrontation is called for in a training or everyday behavior situation, the best solution is to put your dog away, leave the house and cool off. I know I get downright hysterical with Wesley sometimes, but I know he's just doing what is natural for a 4 1/2 month old BC puppy with too much energy. We all have things to improve on ourselves, and I think dogs help with that. What I worry about is people who get so comfortable hitting their dogs that it becomes a training tool and a frequent occurance.
     
  7. JessLough

    JessLough Love My Mutt

    Joined:
    May 16, 2009
    Messages:
    13,402
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Kennel Manager
    Location:
    Guelph, Ontario
    These.

    If it is something that is putting herself or others in danger, she has been hit on the ass for it. Such as deciding to lie down in the middle of the street and refuse to budge. (I swear she can make herself weigh 500lbs when she's stubborn) Basically, if the choice is to hit or have serious consequences (in the case of the road, she is hit and injured or killed), hitting is going to win.

    She also enjoys being beat for play :p I was actually beating up on her yesterday and she kept leaning in for more, as I was trying to prove a point to my mother :lol-sign: Even when I HAVE hit her for things such as laying in the middle of the road and making herself weigh 500lbs, I'm pretty sure she moved because she was enjoying the "play" xD
     
  8. Barbara!

    Barbara! New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    1,457
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I smacked my dog, Chevelle, with her leash when she was around 6 months old to stop the zoomies. This was before I knew a whole lot about dog training. Did it work? Yes. Do I wish I would have known a better way to do it? Yes. Have I done it since I figured out the better way to do it? No.

    I spanked my cat while they were in the act of peeing on my clothes. Do I regret it? Not entirely, because they stopped peeing and I was able to remove them from the pile and take them to their box. Did it work? I don't know. I just stopped leaving piles of clothes around. Didn't want to set my cat up to fail.

    I popped, and still pop, my dog Malyk on the nose to get his attention when he is avoiding listening to me or giving me his attention. He is an EXTREMELY physical dog, and it's not a painful pop, nor is it really a correction. It's a "Hey dumbass, pay attention" sort of pop. He listens every time. He is easier to communicate with through physical means instead of visual or vocal.

    I have also spanked my dogs another smattering of times out of anger, sure. I don't ever feel "okay" about it, but I'm human and it happens. That doesn't make me a dog abuser, nor does it mean I don't love my dogs.
     
  9. Moth

    Moth Mild and Slightly Nutty

    Joined:
    May 9, 2011
    Messages:
    5,037
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    3
    Location:
    Madison, WI
    I have threatened Watson with spankings jokingly...but it is not something that would ever happen.

    I have popped him on the nose before it was a situation where he was getting into something that would have caused injury and it was the only quick option to startle him away. I don't feel good about it...

    I do get angry and frustrated with them at times...but I try to walk away and I never feel good about being angry with them.

    Watson does enjoy a playful thumping of the chest and bottom at times :D
     
  10. adojrts

    adojrts New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2006
    Messages:
    4,089
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    7
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    I am not thinking about those situations that you react in a manner that may not be ideal but trying to stop a situation. Those are the times that what you should do often goes out the window. Training however is different, then no :)
     
  11. sassafras

    sassafras mushinois

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Messages:
    6,405
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Minnesota
    In an emergency, I will do what I gotta do.

    In play, Squash loves to be thumped and slapped.

    In training, no. I will put a prong collar on Squash in really high distraction environments, but I don't pop it. He just won't pull against it. Scootering, Squash will sometimes get so entranced by something that I have to physically pull him back onto the trail. But it's like... using his harness to pull him backwards, not anything like a pop or jerk. It's just for fun, so I don't need to be hardcore about it.
     
  12. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2006
    Messages:
    10,234
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    I agree with others who said that it's acceptable if you're preventing injury or death to someone (person, your dog, another animal, ect.)

    In those cases, I don't view it as training. I view it as "crisis management". Your dog trying to eat a kid =/= a training moment. You do whatever is necessary to keep everyone safe and alive, then go back and train later when the dog isn't overstimulated and nobody is in danger.
     
  13. Shai

    Shai & the Muttly Crew

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Messages:
    6,216
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    As others have said, when you're trying to stop a dangerous situation the normal rules do not apply. When Mira was attacked by that Belgian Sheepdog out of the blue and I was trying to keep that dog off mine until backup arrived...yeah I would never treat a dog that way in any other sort of situation but you do what you have to do in that moment to prevent greater injury.

    In training? Oh heck no. In life? I do my best to never need to. First in line to say I'm not perfect but I've worked too hard to have the working and casual relationships I do with my dogs to undermine that in a fit of temper.
     
  14. yoko

    yoko New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Messages:
    5,347
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    I do in play and sometimes i hit her with a door or a book but thats an accident stemming from she wants to pretty much be one with me at all times lol. but never in training do i think it is ok. Ever. Period.

    I have said it before another dog attacking yours go for it. Your dog is trying to tear into someone I get it. But just training? No

    I'll admit yoshi was a lot harder to train then lady. With lady it was basically tell her what I wanted and it was good. Teaching yoshi was a pain in the ass at times. But even when I was frustrated hitting was never an option. She's my heart dog and I love her. She can tell when I'm happy or upset and seeing me frustrated is enough to focus a little bit. But would I hit someone who didn't understand me? No. Why would I do it to the little animal that constantly gives her all?

    If you hit out of frustration IMO that's not ok and you need to take a step back. If you are training and you have to hit to 'get the point across' then you need more patience and willingness to make another way work.
     
  15. Dizzy

    Dizzy Sit! Good dog.

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2005
    Messages:
    17,761
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Not enough.
    Location:
    Wales
    I avoid all physical correction as best as I humanly can. I've lost my temper and swatted Bodhi before, and felt horrible for it.
     
  16. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Messages:
    22,034
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    2 dogs
    Location:
    western Wa

    Threats?
    Positive punishment?
    Striking us? :yikes:

    Eddie! Sheesh! You should know better than this.:p Here's your alternative:
    "My, my...I'm so proud of you so far for discussing this topic in a civil and polite way. Here, I am giving you $10.00 for all of the posts you've written which are full of love and kindness." :rofl1:


    I agree. When you need to shove, kick, yank, whatever to avoid a potential fight or keep a dog from hurting himself or others...well, ya gotta do what you gotta do. But as far as training or just losing your temper, no. Not right. Those kinds of things, no matter how mild have no place in training or interacting with a dog. And that goes for yelling, shouting or being intimidating verbally/emotionally.

    Playing rough, slapping a dog when he knows you're playing and is having fun is an entirely different thing than bewildering a dog with anger or something that confuses him.
     
  17. GoingNowhere

    GoingNowhere Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,793
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    USA
    I've never hit a dog, but there have definitely been a handful of times when I jerked at a leash much more harshly than necessary. Inevitably, I've felt terrible afterwards.

    The one and only time that I know of in which a dog has been hit in my household was when I was much much younger and my old dog, Buddy, lunged at my brother and bit him square above and below the eye. Buddy was chewing his bone and when my young brother got too close (though not actually reaching for the bone), Buddy bit him. It's a blessing that my brother isn't blind in one eye. My dad hit the dog to the point that he yelped (out of fear or pain, I don't know). I was young and remember being very upset about the entire situation (of both my brother and the dog).

    Looking back now, I would say that that action wasn't right nor appropriate, but it was understandable from an emotional perspective.


    All that said, I agree with most everyone else that the only truly appropriate time to hit an animal would be in the midst of an emergency.
     
  18. BlackPuppy

    BlackPuppy Owned by Belgians

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    674
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Once I pretended to throw a (large) bone at my dog and he ran the wrong way and got hit by it. He did a lot of ducking after that happened.
     
  19. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Messages:
    22,034
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    2 dogs
    Location:
    western Wa
    I can't think where hitting a dog in an emergency would do anything though anyhow. I can see grabbing, yanking, pulling, kicking (to move the animal away) to be able to physically break up a dog fight. But hitting?

    Long ago I use to use compulsive methods too. It was seemingly all there was and it's how we were brought up. Super bossy, yank on the leash, stern voices. But hitting a dog or using any real physical roughness was not done in my family. The alpha...show 'em who's boss was the name of the game back then. Thankfully, for my dogs as an adult, I figured out much more effective ways to train without having to shut the dog down with punishment and reduce our relationship to one of dictator and slave.
     
  20. PlottMom

    PlottMom The Littlest Hound

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    2,835
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    4 dogs
    Location:
    SoCal
    I smack Rage around all the time.

    She does not indicate that she notices or cares. Mostly this is in play ;)

    I am as completely hands-off as possible when training Liz, because she is unbelievably soft.

    Daisy can do no wrong. Ever. And she doesn't like to play rough.

    I think the only time I've ever really hit one was breaking up a dog fight...
     

Share This Page