Help~~~

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by Hellojacy, Jan 9, 2004.

  1. Hellojacy

    Hellojacy New Member

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    Hi!
    I have a 5 month old tcup poodle...
    I've had her for about 3 months now and she still can't learn to go on the wee wee pads we have everywhere in the house...
    The vet said she might have a urinary infection or it might just be mental...
    We've tried the ammonia spray, newspapers, awards, and nothing's really working. We would just like her to go on the wee wee pads...
    Any suggestions? Am i missing anything?
    Any advice would help at this point...
    Thank you! :)
     
  2. Lynn

    Lynn Super Moderator

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    Did you try when she has an accident, rubbing her nose in it, then taking her to the wee wee pads? I have found this to do the trick.
     
  3. Brattina88

    Brattina88 Active Member

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    Don't rub her nose in it. It's disgusting and she won't understand what you are trying to get her to do, and it might make her scared of you. She'll go in less obvious spots, trying to hide it from you which isn't what you want. Try confining her to one room at a time. The kitchen is good, or keep her in the same room you are in so you can have a good eye on her. When you see her circling or acting like she as about to "go" call her over to the nearest pad or pick her up and take her there if she ignores you. Keep putting her back on the pad until she goes, and when she finally does praise her ravishly! Maybe you should try crate training... here is a site about crate training and paper training.

    http://www.about-dogs.com/puppy_house_break_training.htm
     
  4. soccerwoofer

    soccerwoofer New Member

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    The wee wee pads aren't gonna make her wanna go on her own. When she starts to go pee,you have to grab her and run to the nearest wee wee pad. When she goes on the carpet you have to scold her so she knows it's bad then when she goes on a pad praise her a lot! and even give a special treat like a sausage,i dunno if its bad for dogs but my mom said once in an extremly long while it's ok
     
  5. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Several people have told me they've had success with using crate training to housebreak their dogs. Since dogs typically don't want to soil in their living environment, they learn to hold it overnight, or however long they are in the crate, and this behavior somehow leads to using the pads or asking to go outside. I can't speak to it first hand as I've never had to resort to it with the larger dogs. I've only really had to housetrain two dogs; the Jack Russell my parents got me when I was 3 (my Mom did the house training on that one) and my first German Shepherd when I was 13. He didn't really have to be housebroken in the usual sense. The only time he had a problem with going in the house was during as stage when he was about 3 months old. We had a full length mirror in the downstairs hallway, and for some reason, he would stand in front of it and watch himself urinate. There was a VERY short period later on when he was just figuring out the whole leg-lifting rigamarole. He had to try out everything, including the stair railing in the upstairs hallway! I still don't know how he managed to splatter that far.

    Good luck! I know you're getting frustrated. Maybe, if you don't live somewhere that you could lose your puppy in a snowdrift, she might accept the great outdoors more quickly than the pads.
     
  6. soccerwoofer

    soccerwoofer New Member

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    :( the whole pads thing doesn't work for me :( my dog likes to pee on the carpet because its soft,whenever he goes outside he always goes on the mat. help?
     
  7. k9rotehexe

    k9rotehexe New Member

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    noses!!

    :confused:

    Sorry but I was told a long time ago that the dog nose is very sensitive, and rubbing the nose in pee doesn't make sense to a dog. If you don't catch your dog in the act then you can't do anything. Sorry but that sounds as bad as the people that tell me they beat thier dog when it comes back from running away. In that situation the dog thinks its being beating for coming home. Dogs think differently then humans. You don't rub your childs nose in the diaper for peeing in it do you even though you would rather your child be potty trained. Confine your dog to one area and don't free feed and water. Give him or her water before going out each time and take your dog out every 30 min-1 hr when your home.

    Hope that helps.
     

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