Help with 1 year old littermates

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by MCaussade, Aug 22, 2006.

  1. MCaussade

    MCaussade New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Need help..

    Me and my girlfriend just got 2 female puppies from the same litter about 3 weeks ago, despite what we've read about a) getting 2 female dogs and b) from the same litter... The problems we're having are that they seem to be inseparable. We're having a hard time keeping them away from each other and preventing them from bonding with each other more than with us... And also they seem to play/fight all the time... Any advice on what we can do to keep them from becoming too attached to each other???
     
  2. xo_PuPpYlUvEr_xo

    xo_PuPpYlUvEr_xo Brittany

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    1,327
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2 dogs, 2 guinea pigs, 1 hamster, & some fishy! RI
    Location:
    In my house
    Well, I think it's so cute that you and your friend did that first of all, lol... BUT, maybe just don't let them see eachother so often, and they will hopefully start getting used to being with just you and just your friend, not together... just my opinion, lol! BTW, congratulations on your new puppy!
     
  3. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    64,812
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You're right ...2 from the same litter usually end up like this . Pick out a pup each, and work independently with them . I tried to talk a couple out of getting 2 many years ago .... finally about at age of 8 months, they had to give one up to a family member . I wish you well !
     
  4. LizzieCollie

    LizzieCollie Collie Crazy

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    291
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    1 1/2
    Location:
    Puerto Rico
    I think the OP and his girlfriend live together. If that is the case you are in for a long haul. Getting two pups at the same time is the worst because they usually bond more to their littermate and are much harder to housetrain.

    If I were you I would treat the two pups as if they lived in different houses. Crate one in one end of the house, and the other girl at the other end of the house. Establish with your girlfriend who will take care of who. If you want to take care of puppy A, make sure you take her out alone, feed her alone, give her a lot of playtime with you, and only let them get together once for a brief play session. You'll need to keep them isolated from eachother until they are older and one has bonded with you and the other with your girlfriend.

    Then when you get them together (i'd say at aroung 6 months) they wont be so inclined to be together all the time.

    When Lizzie was younger we had the same problem. She only wanted to be with my mothers Golden, but now she will sniff, wag and then follow me.
     
  5. Caren+Bailey

    Caren+Bailey New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Messages:
    1,106
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I don't really have any advice for you but to wish you well with them!!
    My mother-in-law got 2 females from the same litter and i know she said it was hard work.
    What breed are they by the way?
     
  6. MCaussade

    MCaussade New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    thanks everyone for all the advice and well wishes... we knew going in that it would be tough but had no idea it would be this tough... the hard part is that my apartment is very small so it makes it even hard to really separate them... but makes sense to do things separately like taking them out, feeding the etc... they're already housebroken for the most part (save for maybe 1 accident each per week if that) and we've only had them for a couple weeks so that's working out pretty well....

    they're Catahoula Bulldogs... :)
     
  7. MK&C

    MK&C Faint

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Bagels - DSH cat, Charlie - cockapoo
    Try to have them do as many separated activities as possible. Make sure that they are trained seperately! Place their crates far from eachother (preferrably out of sight from one and other). Play with them seperately. Walk them seperately. Groom them seperately. Go on car trips seperately. You get the idea! They can still spend time and play with eachother together, just not all the time.

    Good luck!!! :)
     
  8. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    64,812
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Keep us posted on the progress !
     
  9. J's crew

    J's crew New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    1,228
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions or could help.

    A little background. I rescued a Pointer mix in March of 05. Two days after I got her she whelped 10 puppies. I went against my better judgement (2 puppies, same sex) since my sister wanted 2 of the pups and adopted 2 males to her. She took them home at 8 weeks. The sire of the pups was (possibly) a Rottweiler/Swiss Mountain Dog.

    The pups are now almost 18 months old. They have been to basic obedience. They have been raised around children and are (were?) the friendliest dogs you could ever meet.

    They are VERY hyper and energetic. They get one long walk per day and although they are kept in a 30x30 kennel they are allowed access to a huge fenced yard 2-3 times per day for an hour each time to fetch, swim, and play. They sleep inside the house every night.

    My sister lives a few hours away so I do not see them all the time. The last time I saw them they were IMO very good natured. Not aggressive in any way shape or form. Also, at that time, about 2 months ago they weighed between 90 and 100 pounds. :eek: I really never thought they would get that big because their mother weighs 40 pounds but I guess you never know.

    Apparently from what my sister says the last 2 weeks or so she has seen a change. Those are her words. I don't know if she can read dog language very well so the signs may have been there longer, she just never recognized them.

    One of the dogs, Barkley, upon coming in to go to bed at night will bark nonstop, throw himself around and generally cause chaos. He used to just come in and lay down and go to sleep. When he gets corrected, verbaly, with a hard stare and no nonsense attitude that will cause Whiskey the other dog to growl at my sister and show teeth.

    Then, the other morning she tried to get Barkley to go outside but he wouldn't. She took him by his collar and started walking him to the door and then he started growling with teeth showing.

    They are both intact :rolleyes: but have appoinments to be fixed next week. I advised to up the formal training and keep them seperate as much as possible except for some play times.

    My sister is at her wits end. I think she bit off more than she can chew. But, since I rescue and adopt I knew they would have the best vet care, attention, and love possible. Good homes are so hard to find and my sister is an animal lover just like me.

    Any suggestions? Or should we just go with what I already suggested? Basicaly neutering and training.
     
  10. xo_PuPpYlUvEr_xo

    xo_PuPpYlUvEr_xo Brittany

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    1,327
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2 dogs, 2 guinea pigs, 1 hamster, & some fishy! RI
    Location:
    In my house
    I think that getting thewm nuetered will help for sure! Good luck sweetie!
     
  11. showpug

    showpug New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Messages:
    5,218
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    3 pugs and a bulldog
    Location:
    Oregon
    Neutering is a must immediatley. However, don't expect a sudden change. It takes a few weeks for hormones to filter out of a dog's system.

    On another note, they have learned the behavior and that will have to be corrected. I would recommend your sister start the NILIF training method right away to help establish her authority.

    I also thought I read that you said she "stares" at the dog when she corrects it. This action is taken as a challenge and a threat to dogs. Because the two are littermates, the one not being corrected is stepping up to "help out and protect." Like a pack. I would suggest she stop staring the dog down while correcting it.

    The dogs should probably have training sessions away from one another, so they each develop an independant relationship with your sister and see her as their leader.
     
  12. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    94,266
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    3, Bimmer, GSDX (m); Kharma, Fila Brasileiro (f);
    Location:
    Where the selas blooms
    Home Page:
    Oh, you need to talk to Gempress and Jess! :D
     

Share This Page