guard dog

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by huskygirl, Jun 20, 2004.

  1. huskygirl

    huskygirl New Member

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    hey everyone. i'm new here. i was wondering what type of breed dogs are good as guard dogs? i love siberian huskies but they aren't good guard dogs, are they?
     
  2. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    It depends on what you want from a guard dog and the circumstances you live in.

    Will your Husky protect you if he thinks you're in danger? I wouldn't bet against it! They aren't as territorial, though, as some breeds. If you think about what they were bred to do, it makes sense, though. They traditionally have to live and interact with other dogs in situations where they may have to work with strange dogs at any time. They also had to live in fairly close communities with a number of different people, since populations were clustered in that harsh environment.

    German Shepherds and Dobermans are superlative guard dogs, especially in populated areas, as they will take direction well and will look to their owners for guidance and are relatively easily socialized, even though they are protective and territorial and are very capable of subduing a full grown man.

    Dogs like our Filas, and dogs like the Anatolian and the Komondor, for example, are "ultimate" guard dogs and need either a more rural setting, or very strong, dominant owners who are extremely dedicated to proper socialization and nurturing, although a combination of both is best. They also need more room than is typically available in the suburbs or city. These dogs use their own judgement regarding threats, a necessary trait when entrusted with the guardianship of herds without constant human supervision, so it is imperative that the owner provide them the socialization experience to differentiate between what is a threat and what is not, especially when you consider their size and strength.

    Of course, these aren't the only breeds that are good guardians; they're just examples of types. There are so many breeds to choose from that if you do some research, you can come up with the breed that will suit your personality and your lifestyle perfectly.
     
  3. Aussielover

    Aussielover New Member

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    Our security dog, the Aussie

    I can only give you advice on my personal experience. I own 2 Australian Shepherds and they are the best dogs and guard dogs I have ever owned. They are very nice dogs but very very protective of our house. It is their territory. My male dog has jumped out of the front window (through the screen) when my daughter fell on the front lawn. They are herding dogs so there has to be some caution if you have young children. We discourage the behaviour with our children so it hasnt been a huge problem. Only when they are in the pool, our dog will herd the kids and keep them in the pool. I have had what you would call "guard dogs" and I would much rather have our Aussie's. They are nice if you were to meet them at the dog park but don't walk into our house with my husband or me. You can read up on the breed to see if they would fit into your life style. Good luck on your quest, I hope you get a life long companion in addition to security. :D
     
  4. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    You're right about the Aussies. We have a blind Aussie - born that way - rescued from the shelter just as everyone was saying good-by to him before they took him back to put him down (seems no one wanted to adopt a 3 month old blind puppy; their loss). He lives at my parents' home, where he is greatly loved and cherished and has a fenced in yard to run in. O'Riley's getting older now, but all his life he's been a great watchdog, if you can say that about a blind dog. He hears everything and challenges everything, and he's absolutely fearless. He has a big advantage, too, if anyone were to try to come in at night! I can't say, though, that he's particularly social with anyone other than the family; if he doesn't know you he will react aggressively. And yes, even blind he herds EVERYTHING!

    Also, I don't know if it's peculiar to the breed or if it's just his personality, but I've never seen a dog with such joy in everyday life. He's really amazing.
     
  5. pitbulliest

    pitbulliest New Member

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    If you're thinking of getting a guard dog, you should probably do some research first. Alot of guard breeds have damaged reputations because of the public's ignorance to educate themselves. Also, some home owners insurance policies will reject home owners if they own certain breeds of dogs..so you should also check that out.

    Owning a guard dog, or any dog for that matter is a huge responsibility. Make sure you keep your dog safe and make sure others are safe as well. One bad incident that your dog is involved with could further add onto any negative stereotypes that the general public has for your specific breed of dog, and make it worse for other dog owners of that breed as well.

    Also, you will need to train the dog properly. Training a guard dog on your own is probably not the best idea. You can find alot of very good training schools which will give you the right advice and techniques for training your pet so that you can also become more educated at reading your dog's body language and having a stronger relationship with him/her...Always be a responsible dog owner...

    Anyways, I wish you well and hope that you know what you are getting into before you jump in...

    good luck :)
     
  6. chazhound

    chazhound Alpha Dog Staff Member

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    Hi Pittbullist, welcome to Chazhound Dog Forums!

    Well said. Even though my dobie was a pussy cat, it was hard to find insurance.

    Chazhound
     
  7. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    I actually had a homeowners' carrier (Indiana Mutual, I think the name was) cancel me rather abruptly because of Bimmer. Of course, he'd saved them a ton of money and possibly worse a few weeks before by scaring off a man who pulled up in front of my house with an empty van - thinking no one was home - to clean me out. Bimmer was in the house with me and went berserk. Dude LEFT! He must've left 10 feet of burned rubber tracks in front of the house. When I called the police and gave them a description of the van, the man and the tag numbers, it turned out that they knew him and he had a rather extensive record for breaking and entering.

    So, a trained guard dog isn't necessary to take care of you, your family and your home; just a dog with the right personality and a sense of responsibility and some normal, everyday training that you would give any family pet. There are lots of breeds that will fit that description, and you don't have to have a 100 pound dog to do the job, either.

    You can find a great dog at your local shelter, especially if you're willing to adopt an adult dog. When you adopt an adult dog you not only know how big it's going to be, but you can get a good, solid grasp of the dog's personality. It seems like there's really a special bond between a dog and the person who saved him or her from the shelter, especially when they're grown. They know what's going on, and they know what you've done for them.
     
  8. shredhead (DOG LOVER)

    shredhead (DOG LOVER) Dog Spoiler

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    Amen to that. My miniature dachshund saved me from a burglar when he pulled up into my driveway. All the lights were off in the house so the man started to hit the door with a crowbar. My dog started barking like crazy and scared him away. lol a 10 pound dogs scared away a full grown adult man. I gave the burglars descriptions to the police but he was never found.
     
  9. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    I've seen many interviews with men convicted of armed robbery and burglary, and they all say the same thing: an alarm system poses no great threat to them, but the thing that will most often make them pick another house is a loud dog, not even necessarily a big one - one that's loud. Of course, I doubt it hurts when all that noise is backed up by a set of jaws full of teeth!

    When I was a kid we had the ideal combination - a very loud, angry toy Fox Terrier and a German Shepherd.
     
  10. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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  11. seaecho

    seaecho New Member

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    As far as Filas go - they are more for the experienced dog owner, as they have to be watched carefully. They can easily have trouble distinguishing friend from foe upon first meeting someone. Same with Neopolitan mastiffs and Cane Corsos. They are naturally very aggressive and could easily mistake any quick movement from a human as a threat. Too much liability there. I'd say German Shepherds tend to be the most reliable guards. Many Dobies are big wimps - they tend to be either all or nothing type dogs. Either very aggressive or pussy cats! So seeing both parents would give you a very good indication of how your pup would respond to a potential threat when he gets older. If the parents bark a warning when you approach, but don't try to attack, you'd probably have a good chance of having a dog who would sound a warning. You don't want your dog attacking everyone who comes to your door, so there's a fine line, and you have to be careful not to overdo aggressiveness.

    I have to agree that many Aussies are good watchdogs. They'll put on a good, loud show and some will bite if provoked. But they can tend to be excessive barkers, as can German Shepherds.

    Huskies of any type don't tend to be very good watch or guard dogs. They aren't particularly territorial, and are often escape artists, destructive, and tend to be whiny and yappy. I don't think most people would be happy with one. They need a tremendous amount of grooming too, they shed terribly, and and difficult to train because they are stubborn. They love to dig holes, and generally have too much energy to burn because they are bred to pull sleds all day long. Not fair to keep a dog like that shut into a yard where he can't run to his heart's content!

    Great Danes will sound an alarm, and just their size alone is enough to deter most intruders. But they aren't usually known for attacking. Even though they are so big, they are sweethearts with their family and known friends, so that is why I'm personally getting one. Good protection because most people wouldn't dare take the chance of coming in my gate with a dog that size standing there! Even if he wasn't even barking at them!

    Just some thoughts for you to chew over.

    Randi
     
  12. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Randi, prepare yourself for an onslaught of retorts from justifiably outraged owners of the breeds you've just dismissed so summarily. Although if you're lucky, we're all too fed up with the rash of ignorance about dog aggression that we've dealt with recently to be bothered and you'll just be ignored.

    The properly bred and raised Fila Brasiliero is not an aggressive animal. It is a guardian and a drover. They do not have trouble distinguishing between friend or foe upon a first meeting. Filas do not have "friends" on first meeting typically; it's called ojeriza; they do not want to be friends with strangers, they expect to be left alone and the expect their people and property to be respected. You can go to this thread in the forum: http://www.chazhound.com/forums/showthread.php?t=799

    Also visit http://www.mindspring.com/~anableps/fila.html

    It's also a serious temperament fault for a Dobie to retreat from a threat.

    Please educate yourself before you make completely unjust, libelous and sweeping generalizations about dog breeds. You sound like you're writing recommendations for these homeowners' insurance companies that so arbitrarily discriminate against breeds.

    Good owners bring out the best in their dogs; bad owners cause problem dogs.

    And be glad you didn't mention Pits or Staffies in your post!
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2004
  13. pitbulliest

    pitbulliest New Member

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    OH..and a really important word of advice..never just chain your dog in the backyard and expect it to take care of itself..i find alot of people that want "guard dogs" doing this....I mean, the dog isn't going to take care of itself...it needs to be properly socialized and loved..not just expected to sit out there and watch out for strangers...the dog, just like any other, will require daily exercise (this sure as heck doesn't include the back yard :rolleyes: ) plus a chained up dog is an unhappy dog that ends up depressed, anti-social, and at many times, develops behavioral and even aggressive problems...so like I said before...make sure you really know what you're doing and getting yourself into before you get a dog of ANY sort for ANY purpose.
     
  14. Dude you guys left out a aswome guard dog the rottweiler. You may also wanna consider A GIANT SCHNAUZER
     
  15. RD

    RD Are you dead yet?

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    Seecho, I see MANY flaws in the observation you just made but I'm going to just point out that your observation of many of those breeds was incorrect.

    Just for the record (I can't resist) Sibes make EXCELLENT watch dogs and if they are bathed and have their undercoat raked out regularly, they don't shed much.
     
  16. ButtGumbo

    ButtGumbo Ass Lover

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    I'll throw Rottweilers into the mix here because I had one that was a great watchdog.

    Rotties, like Pits get a bad rap, mainly because of irresponsible owners and breeders. A well bred and trained Rott is an amazingly loving, obedient, and protective dog. Their herding instincts tend not to be as aggressive as smaller BC/ACD type dogs, so they tend to be easier with family kids. If you want a dog that will scare the BeJesus out of an unwelcome intruder, a snarling Rott mug is the canine equivilent of hearing a pump action shotgun rack a shell. My female Rottie was an imposing figure to any unknown person in our yard. If startled she would growl and bark, unless I was there to say "He/She is o.k. Friend." She was not aggressive but WOULD attack on command. She sure as hell looked aggresive though :)

    Pit Bulls can be good guard dogs, but are unfortunately a liabilty (through no real fault of their own), for the most part they are sweet dogs and very protective of those around them. I personaly am not crazy about them, but only because of asthetics...has nothing to do with the breed.

    If you need a dog with good alert instincts and the muscle to back up a threat, Rotties are a good choice. Do NOT get a Rottie and chain it up. Rotties require obedience training and activity to keep them from becoming bored...they are extremely intelligent animals.

    That said, being a defense/gun guy my "guard dog" needs have changed over the years. Nowadays I simply need an "Alarm Dog". If I was away on travel like I was years ago I would want a Rottie (or breed the others have discussed) at home to protect the family. Now I'm home every night, so all I require is the best early warning dog I can get.

    For that reason I chose a (mixed) herding dog, medium sized. My 3YO son is scared of "BIG dogs", and since a Rott would be overkill anyway I searched out and found mixed breed dog that had some Rott and herder in it. Just like the blind BC story, herding dogs have excellent hearing and are very vocal when they perceive a threat. You need a some room to let them burn off their ample energy, but they are very protective of "their pack" and smart, funny, and sweet. They also excell at agility and flyball if you would want to do any sporting activities with your dog as well.

    I really like Heelers/Australian Cattle Dogs. Be warned that they do need good training and socialization as they have VERY strong natural herding instincts. Trained, they are sweet and protective dogs that have great personalities.

    Boarder Collies are good alarm dogs too, but be prepared to work with them and exercise them a fair amount as they have boundless energy.

    I also have seen very protective Shelties and they are sweet family dogs.

    Best advice I could give is to find an AKC dog obedience/agility show and talk to a bunch of people. If you find a purebred you like then there ya go...if you find TWO you like, try and find a mix. :)

    I ended up with what I think is a Rott/BC mix and she's perfect for the house.
     
  17. RD

    RD Are you dead yet?

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    Well I certainly can say that a Border Collie is a very effective deterrent.. My pup is already protecting his home turf at, um, 11 weeks. :p (If anything I'll have to train him to be LESS protective)
     
  18. Mz_Mutley

    Mz_Mutley Owned By Neos

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    Not jumping down your throat or anything here Seacecho but that is one hundred percent true. Yes there are Neapolitan Mastiffs out there that are aggressive BUT not all of them. This is not what the breed standard requires of the Neo


    Temperament

    The Neapolitan is a guard dog and is protective by nature. Even though they have a fierce appearance, they are generally peaceful, steady dogs with even temperaments. They are usually wonderful with their own families but wary of strangers. If they have a personality flaw, it is that, like many mastiffs, they can be stubborn and can be shy. It is important to socialize the Neapolitan and to get it accustomed to different people and places. It is also critical that owners never forget the instinctive nature of the dog. Raising a Neo requires an awareness of how dogs think and behave, and a consistent sensible discipline.

    Taken from www.neorescue.net


    Temperament

    TEMPERAMENT - Steady and loyal in character, not aggressive nor liable to bite without reason, a defender of property and its inhabitants, he is always vigilant, intelligent, noble and majestic.

    Taken from the Neapolitan Mastiff Breed Standard (Australian National Kennel Club)

    They are a protective breed and will protect their family with their life if required, but in general are by no mean vicious... I have a a few that even been used to visit nursing homes.... certainly something that an aggressive dog could not do.

    Sorry but I just wanted to have a chance to let those who are not aware that there is a difference between aggressive and protective

    Cheers
    Mz Mutley :D
     
  19. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Thanks for the post!

    The distinction between aggressive and defensive/protective is one that's getting lost in sensational headlines.

    We have Fila Brasileiros, and it's frustrating at times to hear them spoken of or see them written about as aggressive. They'd really rather just be left alone, but, like your Neos and so many other dogs branded with the adjective "aggressive," will defend their owners (do you ever really own a molosser? ;) ) and their property.

    "Aggressive" is a word that's been thrown around far too cavalierly to inaccurately describe too many dogs and breeds. There are too many aggressive owners who manipulate their dogs' defensive instincts, but very few truly aggressive breeds.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2004
  20. Mz_Mutley

    Mz_Mutley Owned By Neos

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    Renee,
    I totally agree with you.... finally someone that can see where I am coming from *YAY* I think that forums are a great place for people to have their say but it absolutely infuriates (sp?) me when people start going around and stating their opinions as facts!! If you wish to state something then you need to have some sort of knowledge about the topic you are discussing.

    Seaecho if you are reading this I just think that next time you choose to pass judgement on a breed you actually research the breeds before you let your fingers do the typing. A lot have been offended by your unfounded and downright incorrect comments.

    Never as much as a molosser owns you :D


    Cheers
    Mz Mutley :D
     

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