Golden Retrievers - Field Bred vs. Show Bred

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by JacksonsMom, Mar 17, 2013.

  1. JacksonsMom

    JacksonsMom Active Member

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    Always had a soft spot for Goldens, a Golden was my very first dog ever. But I had kind of gotten over the idea of ever wanting one again until a few months ago.

    It certainly wouldn't be ANY time soon, and I'm not even sure when I'm ready for another dog still, and have another breed on my close radar.

    Anywho, I don't really know that much about Goldens other than growing up with one, having relatives with them, and I've also dogsat for a few (two different pairs). But in terms of what to look for in breeders, etc, no clue.

    From my understanding, there's a big difference between field bred lines and pet show dog lines? Is there anything somewhat in between? I really like the looks of the field bred dogs better (vs. the more stocky, bigger heads of a lot of show dogs).

    There was a Golden in my agility class who was a bit TOO high strung for my liking. He was always pulling his owner in the door, and he WAS great on the agility course, but there was a few times he just decided to take off and he went 'after' the small 6lb papillon mix in class, not really aggressively, but it seemed like high prey drive to me? Anyway, I think a Golden like this would be too intense for me.

    90% of Goldens I meet are not like this though. All of them have been great with small dogs, and really easy going in the house, but able to go go go when the time is right too. Goldens are a breed I've never been annoyed by, either. lol. The ones I dogsat I was just in love with, especially the male. He would play fetch for hours, but he wasn't annoying about it either, and when you would go inside, he would just lay down by your feet. Super easy going but still ready to play!

    Anyway, any Golden experiences, differences between breeders, etc.
     
  2. Raegan

    Raegan Member

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    Speaker is one of my favorite Goldens: http://www.k9data.com/pedigree.asp?ID=14135

    My agility and field trainer has dogs by him, and watching them run agility is why I wanted to train with her. They're beautiful dark red dogs with the more setter-like build I like. I love to watch them in obedience, too. They just have a presence to them.

    Tanbark is a very popular kennel for obedience Goldens here.
     
  3. Shai

    Shai & the Muttly Crew

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    If she's looking for less high strung, your standard Tanbark dog is not going to be what she's looking for.
     
  4. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    We have a lot of field bred goldens at my work who're down right insane. Many are slightly nasty and they're all overly hyper and pushy. They would all make killer sport dogs but I would never recommend them for the average pet family.
     
  5. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    Man, there were some killer goldens running these last 3 days. Awesome dogs but a lot of dog.
     
  6. *blackrose

    *blackrose "I'm kupo for kupo nuts!"

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    Just from my personal experience, the show bred Goldens I've met have all been good dogs. Very soft and sweet, mellow, but ready to play and romp and do whatever you're up to. There is one dual purpose dog I've met and she's a bit more active and pushy, but also a good dog.

    I net you could find a dog from a dual purpose breeder that would be just what you want. There is a breeder near me that I think would be a good place to start if I were the one looking, but I don't remember their kennel name and I'm not on my computer to find it right now. Lol
     
  7. Raegan

    Raegan Member

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    That's good to know! Literally the only time I see them is in the obedience ring. They came to mind because physically they are between the bench and field types. To my eye anyway.
     
  8. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    Watch for stamina issues with the show/dual goldens. I do agree they are ridiculously cute, sweet, and while they're driven enough to sport but many I've been around are winded easily which can be frustrating.
     
  9. release the hounds

    release the hounds Active Member

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    all the show bred goldens i've met have been pretty nice mellow dogs. unfortunately they'll all died between the ages of 6 and 8 from brain tumors and tumors surrounding their heart. that's at least 5 over the past 5 years, all gone, the last one being my cousins this past fall at the age of 6.5.
     
  10. JacksonsMom

    JacksonsMom Active Member

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    That sucks. :( I wish cancer wasn't so rampant in the breed.

    Thx for all the info.
     
  11. Pops2

    Pops2 New Member

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    But endurance can be built up by a good training program.
     
  12. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

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    My friend runs a show bred Golden in Flyball and doesn't seem to have stamina issues with him. He actually for quite some time was one of the fastest Goldens in the US, not sure about now. He's probably 6 to 7 and she has a girl from the same breeder who is 10ish and still in good health. She also has a old son of her dog who's doing well in flyball training, almost ready to start competing. They're all nice, nice dogs. The older one is a good pet, not very drivey but was bought pre-sports as a pet. The two boys are plenty drivey and they are loud and crazy in Flyball but good dogs all around and fairly typical Goldens. The breeder of her dogs is a very good breeder, came from an obedience background and truly cares about the long term health of her dogs. I'd not hesitate to recommend her to anyone, she has an excellent reputation and has been in the breed for a long time now.

    I think what you want temperament wise (middle of the road) is probably going to be more easily found in show bred Goldens than field bred or obedience bred (which is another "type" in the breed, along with pet lines). Although the show bred dogs will tend to be heavier boned, have blockier heads. There are some pretty serious cancer issues in the breed and I'm not sure any line is really free of it, so definitely you'd want to ask about longevity with any breeder you go to.
     
  13. SpringerLover

    SpringerLover Active Member

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    Given your location, I think I know these dogs (B, B, and B)? And I adore the older male I've met on numerous occasions. He's certainly not slow and cumbersome for a bench bred Golden, not in the slightest.
     
  14. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    Nope, this isn't meant to be insulting at all but I haven't found you can bring out an exponential amount if its not there already. Meaning, no matter the conditioning my clients could only go so far with the average dog of the stockier "teddy bear" show line goldens, ime. I work with several and have for years, they're awesome dogs and have plenty of training drive, they've been some of my favorites actually, but realistically speaking they're not going to last as long as many of the herders or gunbred dogs that we've seen through my work, as far as stamina. Some it may easily be they have had a rather low heat tolerance, which diminishes stamina, due to build and coat.

    There are always exceptions but this is my experience.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  15. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

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    Yes their names all do start with B :) The older boy is awesome! Just exactly what I'd want in a Golden. I haven't been around his son as much as him but he seems really promising. Young and dorky but promising LOL
     
  16. Kilter

    Kilter New Member

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    The field lines can certainly be over the top, Storee is for sure. When asked if I would want another one like her my answer is 'no!!!'. Love her to death but she's certainly the adhd version of the breed and has pushed my training skills a lot. She's improved and calmed down a bit but she's now six. :rofl1:

    My 'show' girl was a lot nicer to work with, she had her own quirks as well but nothing like that. K9 Data is a good resource as it does list how long the dogs lived in there. Bender, my old girl, lived to 13, Storee is six and her mom and grandmother are still kicking and over ten.
     
  17. BostonBanker

    BostonBanker Active Member

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    One of Gusto's best friends is a golden (and the golden's father, but the young one is his age). They are, from all I can tell, show goldens - I hear things like "the father was a successful field trial dog" and such, but I don't think they are actual "let's go hunting" dogs. They are certainly what I think of as show type, and I know the father has his Canadian CH. The father is MACH 3, and the son is also doing agility. I've never been blown away watching either run, but they are successful and steady and do just fine by themselves.

    More importantly, they are nice dogs. I'm not a retriever person, and I don't think I'd ever want one myself, but they are sweet with people, obedient, and great with dogs. Polite and not pushy. I've never seen an ounce of aggression from either. I'm not sure how they'd do in serious heat/physical exertion, but they regularly go on 2 or 3 hour hikes with Gusto and Meg in the winter and hold up just as well as my dogs. They are also fit and not fat.

    I'd have no qualms about recommending a good show breeder to someone looking for a great golden as a pet and a low-to-medium level competition dog.
     
  18. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    I completely agree.
     
  19. Pops2

    Pops2 New Member

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    That thinking is why people think you can't get a mastiff or bulldog run for miles. It is possible it just takes A TON more work to get there & stay there. It's limited to be sure, VERY FEW bulldogs will run with fit hounds but that is as much an issue of effort as ability. Keep in mind I built up my catahoulaXamerican bulldog to where he ran 12 miles at 20mph 3X a week. He had no problems running with plotts & walkers on bear, even though he was 15-25# heavier. It just took a lot of my time & sweat to get him that way & most people can't or won't put in that effort.
     
  20. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    And the ever lasting question would be why do we have dog breeds if you could get any dog to do any task with the right training and conditioning.

    Sure, I could condition a Pekingese to run a 12 mi AD but in the end am I benefiting the dog or merely trying to prove something to my peers?

    The fact of the matter is the English mastiff in my Monday class falls asleep between exercises, she'll light up with cheerleading and work a few minutes then she's done. I am positive if the owners wanted they could build her drive, build her stamina, and make some strong efforts to change her but why? They bought a dog like this because it suits them, why buy a dog and then attempt to change it from its breeding goals?

    I already said the goldens, show lines, I have worked with can sport and almost all do because they've been so fun and pleasurable to train with, but their stamina and heat tolerance has been a consistent issue in each I've seen.

    Even in our daycare at work the show goldens come out rip roaring each morning and crash by lunch, laying and sleeping, until pick up. Meanwhile our gundog goldens are still screaming and tackling dogs as their owners arrive. It's a clear difference but fwiw more often than not the show goldens are far better suited to their owners than the hunting lines that were often bought not for their energy but for their health and now their families are pulling their hair out, they'd make amazing sporting dogs but as pets they leave something to be desired for most.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2013

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