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Discussion in 'Dog Health Care' started by hovo_hopar, Jan 23, 2005.

  1. hovo_hopar

    hovo_hopar New Member

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    hi i think my dog has hearing problems because i noticed i yell when it is not looking and it doesnt even turn its head either it is ignoring me or it cant hear good and i have a question i know im not supposed to but i cant help i alwyas grab the dog and play ruff with it and it has started to bark at me and try to bite but sort of play bite it always tries to play but know she plays ruff im thinking she is just like that i guess she didnt do any of t at first cuz it had to get used to us first aand it has started to show signs of aggresion but in a playful ways does anybody know how t stop a dog from behaving like that and i am definetely gonna stop playing ruff with it cuz it is really starting to get anoying of it canany one help out i would really appreciate it
     
  2. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    First, it sounds like you need to take your dog to the vet to have her hearing checked and get her a good, thorough check-up.

    Second. A gentler approach to play is what you want. Initiate play with her gently, with a toy that she likes, maybe something she can tug on and as long as she's playing without being rough you can keep playing. When she gets too rough, the play stops for ten or fifteen minutes, then you can try it again. After she's played without biting you for a few minutes, reward her with a treat and calm her down. Part of what's going on is she's getting very excited; too much doggy-adrenaline.

    I'd stay away from games that involve chasing or anything that resembles hunting prey too much, since that's going to create too much temptation for her to bite and get over-stimulated. And be sure to avoid the playing behaviour that led to her biting problem.

    A very important part of this is to start working on obedience commands with her. You'll need to teach her some hand signals in case she does have a hearing problem and isn't just ignoring you.

    If you've got something that makes a strange noise that's not too loud, try using it when she's seemingly unaware that you're there. That will give you some idea, but you still need to check it out with the vet.
     
  3. Kelly blackwell

    Kelly blackwell New Member

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    hi Hovo...once you start playing tug games with a dog you are sending several messages..first that you are unsure of your staus in the hierarchy.dominant individuals do not engage in tug games with subordinates.you are posturing the behavior of a peer...secondly in some cases you are saying agression towards humans is not only acceptable its desirable.remember play is practice for real life so dogs that ''practice ''biting humans are headed for trouble..people ask me ''well then why do they sell those tug toys if they are so bad??'' i say ''why do they sell cigarettes and alcohol??...the only time we ever play tug is for dogs who are candiates for detection dogs.because you want to build possesive behavior in that context......stop playing tug and get i some serious obedience classes..that will come in much more handy later on
     
  4. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    If I remember correctly, Hovo, your dog was very meek when you first brought her home from the rescue and her former owner was very elderly, right? She's probably just learning to really play and just needs to be channeled and directed into acceptable play behaviour, and she's not going to be a 150 pound monster (about 20 pounds, right?) so she's never going to be able to pull you over.

    So often we get hung up on all the scientific theories and analytical behavioural hoo-ha and forget that we are dealing with sentient creatures wonderfully suited and adapted over the generations to living with us, adapting to our lifestyles, and most importantly, creatures who love and wish to please us. Dogs are much more intellectually elastic than we often give them credit for being, and learn to adapt to our standards more quickly than we often do to theirs - and after all, being truly "in charge" DOES depend on the less dominant creature adapting to the dominant creature's environment and means of communication. Establish your position with obedience behaviour, like sit and lie down and other things like always feeding her AFTER you have eaten (I also like to occasionally share the last bite of my food with mine, bonding but at the same time asserting they wait until after I've eaten), and you'll be able to teach her how to play. Part of this is also that YOU initiate the play. If she brings you a toy to play or wants to initiate play, have her lie down and wait for two or three minutes, then pick up the toy or call her to you.

    But you were absolutely right about stopping the rough play that encourages her to bite. And ignoring her when she goes back to the biting is the most effective way to get her to stop long term.
     
  5. tl_ashmore

    tl_ashmore Spoiled Rotten Dog

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    I totally disagree with you. I play with my dog like that all the time. She play bites, but only with me. She would never do that to another person. The whole "play is practice for real life".......what is that supposed to mean anyway. This is their real life. Dogs like to play with their owners. Some play rougher than others. I know mine does. But, that doesn't mean that she is headed for trouble and needs obediance classes.
     
  6. hovo_hopar

    hovo_hopar New Member

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    i didnt know you have to feed it only after you eat my dog eats with me she aqually loves the food we eat but the vet said she is a little overweight :rolleyes: myn dog doesnt like her food she hates dry food and i dont knwo how to make her eeat dry i try mixin it with wet food but she hates it like that even more and it smells really really bad i hate the smell how can i make it eat only dry food aoh and renee you are right about staying away form chasing games i always chase her aroumnd fast and she looks like shes having fun but after a fewminutes she starts to get a little aggresive when ever i pick her up and put her down on her bed she starts to bite me but it doesnt hurt and i always show her that i am not afraid of her and i always tell my little sis to leave the dog alone when it starts to get aggresive but she doesnt listen and my brother gets even more mad at me for doing the same lol shes just so irresistable i always feel like squeezing her really hard but i cant lol any advice will be great thanks alot all of you
     
  7. shredhead (DOG LOVER)

    shredhead (DOG LOVER) Dog Spoiler

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    My Boomber does that. Loving dog but has too much energy. Im just giving him gentle training and patience. I know he'll turn out the way I want him to be.
     
  8. Kelly blackwell

    Kelly blackwell New Member

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    Hi Ashmore...you are welcome to disagree.but i am speaking from many years as a professional trainer...most dogs who bite for real are 2-4 years old ...but perhaps your a trainer too.so i think i'll leave any further training advice to you...bye bye everyone
     
  9. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Maybe our Creature Teacher will pick up on this thread and elaborate some more. She really seems to have a loving understanding of dogs and some very good advice.
     
  10. EliNHunter

    EliNHunter New Member

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    I realize this post is somewhat late, but I hope you get it nonetheless. Please put up with the "smell" of canned dog food. Your dog will not get the nutrients from people food, for sure. And will continue to get fatter! Try putting the wet food on the dry food, then mix in a some really hot water and get it like a thick stew for him. Before that step, try mixing in chicken or beef broth as the hot liquid before you move on to the hot water. He'll love it! As for his play-biting... sounds like he needs to know his boundaries. He's a wild-child that has it good. I realized this with my rescued lab. Every day when I got home from work I would just PLAY PLAY PLAY with him, thinking this is what he needs. He was always so hyper when with me. Now I know why. I ingrained in him that ME = PLAY PLAY PLAY. I had to back down and let him know what everyday life was life and it wasn't always about playing with me throwing his ball 24/7. He's finally gotten it. We still play, but he now knows his boundaries and when playtime is appropriate...
     

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