Foundation Agility?

Discussion in 'Agility and Dog Sports' started by Lizmo, Dec 2, 2009.

  1. Lizmo

    Lizmo Water Junkie

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    I've heard lots of people talk about Foundation Agility Classes, so I'm wondering what exactly is taught in this type of class?

    There are no agility classes anywhere near me, so a class is out.
     
  2. SisMorphine

    SisMorphine Your Mom

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    If I remember correctly it was a lot of introduction to equipment, contact work, hind end awareness and footwork (I don't know if you call it footwork in agility, but that's what I'd call it in figure skating LOL).
     
  3. Beanie

    Beanie Clicker Cult Coordinator

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    Here's a book that Clean Run has that I've heard recommended:
    Clean Run: Flatwork—Foundation for Agility

    And some DVD sets (I don't know how good these are)
    Clean Run: Foundation Training for Agility 3-DVD Set
    Clean Run: In FOCUS Foundation Work DVD


    I think people disagree on if obstacle introduction belongs in an agility foundations class. Some say obstacles have no place, others disagree. Auggie was being exposed to obstacles before we ever took any classes and most of his relatives usually are too (it's all over his breeder's backyard so it would be pretty darn hard not to expose them to it!) Usually the exposure is pretty minimal in the classroom setting though.
     
  4. MericoX

    MericoX Roos, Poos, & a Wog!

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    Our first agility class (I've only seen it called beginners agility around here) is being taught the different equipment (contacts not at full height though), how to teach your dog to use equipment on command, and a tiny bit of sequencing. We usually would do about 1-2 new obstacles a night, and slowly add to it.
     
  5. SpringerLover

    SpringerLover Active Member

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    Foundations is about teaching turning, sending, control (how to go from resting to running), warming a dog up, teaching the dog about jump standards, working on jump timing, and jump training... to name a couple things.
     
  6. adojrts

    adojrts New Member

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    Agility Foundations ( as I know it) is flat work, i.e spirals (R & L), gate changes, Front crosses, Rear Crosses, Flips, sending/ Outs, targeting, contact board work, tipping/wobble boards, body awareness, hindend awareness and focus work. Along with expanding on obedience, games and proofing lead outs, recalls etc.
     
  7. MericoX

    MericoX Roos, Poos, & a Wog!

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    I want to take your guys Foundation classes LOL. No wonder we're so messed up...
     
  8. adojrts

    adojrts New Member

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    Mer,

    There is no reason why you can't train it now, it can't do anything but improve upon anyone's handling and control regardless of whether they have already trialed or not. And a lot of it can be used as part of your pre-run warm up when you do trial.

    And you can also work on it in your own home (a huge area is not needed) :))
     
  9. Lizmo

    Lizmo Water Junkie

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    Adojrts, would you mind giving a short explanation -or difinition- on each of the things you mentioned? Some of them I'm familier with, but some I don't think I've heard before.
     
  10. MericoX

    MericoX Roos, Poos, & a Wog!

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    We've worked on all you've said in later classes.... I think it would've been useful to learn first is all.
     
  11. adojrts

    adojrts New Member

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    Oh sorry, misunderstood :) Yes, absolutely agree, its better to start with it than to learn all that on the fly with equipment. Not to mention, its a great way to prep pups after regular obedience for agility and something to do with them while you wait for them to mature.
     
  12. elegy

    elegy overdogged

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    in steve's foundations class we did all of this plus around the clock sends over a low jump, call to heel and side on flat and over a jump, and various self-control exercises (doggy zen, etc). we also played with the tunnel, chute, flattened teeter, and low table.

    the book that was recommended to me and which i found useful, though it includes stuff far more advanced than where we are as well as very basic foundations work is from the ground up by kim collins.
     
  13. adojrts

    adojrts New Member

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    Agreed, very good book for foundations training. I have it but I can't find it :mad:, I generally don't loan out my books/dvd's because I don't remember who has it and often don't get them back :( So I don't think I have loaned it...........gezzzz I will be pissed at myself if I have to purchase it again :rofl1:
     
  14. Lizmo

    Lizmo Water Junkie

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    Ado, I think you might have possible missed my reply? :)

    "Adojrts, would you mind giving a short explanation -or difinition- on each of the things you mentioned? Some of them I'm familier with, but some I don't think I've heard before."
     
  15. adojrts

    adojrts New Member

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    lol yes I did miss it, sorry :)

    Spirals, Figure 8's, Circle work (small and large)- Working your dog on the left and right in heel position, moving in a spiral or other exercise, works great to have a cone/s or something as a focal point in the center. Easy to do when the dog is on the outside of the handler, much harder when the dog is on the inside and not bumping into the handler.

    Gait changes: Change of pace (gait), fast walking and running, accelerations and de-celerations from the body language of the handler i.e leaning forward vs leaning backwards.

    Targets: sending out to a target away from the handler as fast as they can, also a good time to proof task focus vs handler focus and release cues.

    Sending or Outs: teaching the dog to move straight away or laterally from the handler and this is typically done using targets. A dog with an excellent send or out will go at least a hundred feet or more out to go around an object (tree lol) or to do an obstacle that has been named.

    Contact Boards: using a raised board to teach the dog to hold the contract behaviour being trained ( 2 on, 2 off / Running / Stopped) and not stop the behaviour until release cue is given.

    Front Cross: The handler switching sides by crossing in front of the dog, usually done for a change of direction and for tighter lines while running obstacles but should be taught on the flat first.

    Rear Cross: Teaching a dog to drive out in front of the handler and then the handler switching sides behind the dog, typically before an obstacle for a change in direction after the dog has completed the obstacle, so the handler can remain on the inside of an arch in the course,which is the shortest route for the handler.

    Flips: Looks almost like a tandem turn; dog and handler both turn at the same time in the same direction and with enough training this can be done at a distance :D. So if your dog is on your right, you and the dog turn to the right but your dog ends up being on your left.

    Body awareness/hindend awareness: Many dogs have little or no regard (especially larger breeds and puppies of all sizes) of where their feet/body are. Dogs that have spent most of their lives on smooth/even surfaces don't generally have to be concerned about it. Which isn't good for agility lol, the dogs with the best body/foot/hindend awareness are the ones that get lots of time off leash in rough, hilly and very uneven terrian in hard brush or woods. They quickly learn where their bodys are to avoid injury. If that doesn't happen we have to teach them using piles of poles, ladders, backing up etc.

    If I missed anything or it doesn't make sense let me know :D
     
  16. AgilityPup

    AgilityPup Agility freak!

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    ^ That's what we did in Psyche's foundations classes - did wonders for her!
     

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