Fits while on leash

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by Sapphire-Light, May 16, 2010.

  1. Sapphire-Light

    Sapphire-Light woof!

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    I´m leash training my 3 month poodle pup, he is doing ok, I´m using a nylon leash and collar.

    I let him walk inside the house with the leash wit out me grabbing it, he gets threats so he can asociate with positive things.

    The problem was in today's training, I took him to our backyard and I was grabbing the leash on one hand and a threat in another to make him follow me.

    I wasen't pulling at all and he then lied down and trow a fit, he cried and tried to take it off shacking his head and scratching with his front paws, he did this while still lying down.

    I just told him NO and pick him up softly and put him on the ground again so he was standing on his 4 legs again, he follow me again but he did trow other 2 fits later like the first one.

    I'm not sure if what I did was ok? what I can do when he trows a fit again?
     
  2. Maura

    Maura New Member

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    I would use a harness so he doesn't end up getting loose. Puta 4 foot leash on him inside, but just call him to you and when he comes to you, use a tiny treat to lure him into a sit. The instant his butt its the floor, give the treat, praise, and clip the leash on. Wait a minute, then call him to you, lure him to a sit, treat, praise, and take the leash off. Do this several times. He should be coming to you and sitting nicely in front of you automatically. When he can do this, clip a ten foot leash on him (you can make one by getting a clip and some cord at the hardware store). When you take him outside, let him have the full ten feet. When he is about to get into something he shouldn't, walk the other way so that he ends up being gently pulled by you. Jolly him up so that he'll follow you again. You want to teach him to stay near you, but you don't want him rebelling against the pressure. As he gets a little older, you can pull on the leash gently, but not jolly him up. He is learning to stay within ten feet of you.

    This is basic long line work. You should be taking him out of the back yard and to the park and other places on his long line. When you go to a big place, like a park, use a twenty foot line. You will practice the recall on the long line, practice sit when he is one foot from you, three feet from you, five feet from you, etc., so that you can put him in a sit wherever he is. You can practice heel, too, by patting your leg, getting him to come to your left side, treat and praise him while saying "heel". Let him run off again. He will stay at your side longer and longer.
     
  3. Sapphire-Light

    Sapphire-Light woof!

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    Thanks! how those long leashes look?

    Are the same thing as the extendable leashes?
     
  4. Maura

    Maura New Member

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    No. A long leash is simply a leash that is long. You can get them made out of nylon or cotton webbing. A toy poodle puppy is so small, though, that if you go to the hardware store and get marine rope (may be called curtain cord) you can use that. It needs to be the length you want, plus enough to tie a clip on to (the hardware store should have little clips), and to fold back and tie a loop handle with. It lets your puppy get far away from you but still gives you control. Don't follow him as be pulls. Once he gets to the end of the line he'll feel the pressure from the harness and he'll soon realize that when he feels that he should look to see where you are going. You are the leader.
     
  5. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Try not to scold him when he throws a fit. He's just a baby and this leash thing is foreign and awkward for him. I recommend doing lots of practice without the leash in a fenced, safe area. Play with him, encourage him to come along with you. When he does, drop little treats for him. You can toss a treat ahead of you and then again behind you. He'll learn that coming back close to you works to get treats. Make it a fun, brisk game.

    Lots of practice without the leash. Then try with the leash. No pulling, no scolding, no force. Keep your sessions very, very short with the leash. End on a good note when he's doing well. Be a (tiny) treat dispensing machine as he comes along. Don't bribe first. Only as he's staying with you when you walk. Do this in a non-distracting, familiar area at first, then increase the pressure gradually. Always make it fun and never associate walking or working with you with "no's", scolding or force. Use a happy, squeaky voice and a playful countenance.

    Puppies love to find their owners. Hide and seek is lots of fun. Hide only a short distance away at first till he gets onto this game. When he finds you, give him a tiny treat or a favorite toy...lots of praise. This helps him to love coming to you.

    More practice dragging the leash in the house, but always supervised so he doesn't get caught on something and choke or freak out.

    When you work your way to getting further away from the house and you see other dogs or people, protect him from anything frightening....snarky dogs or anything over whelming. During the socialization process, it's very important that only positive associations are made. Little by little, you can introduce more.

    So, in a nutshell, to help him through this stage where he appears to be rebelling (he's really just un-use to the leash) take things slowly, gradually and make it all pleasant and fun for him. Only increase the pressure on him as he succeeds with previous stimuli.

    Good luck.
     
  6. Sapphire-Light

    Sapphire-Light woof!

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    Thanks a lot for the help.

    Doberluv, inside the house he follows me everywhere I go, but in the backyard is different he gets distracted easily and explores the area or wants to follow ants to eat them. :D
     
  7. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Well, that's typical. But the more he gets reinforced (special treats, favorite games) for following you around in the house, the better he'll apply that as he grows...when he's outside in more distracting environments. Everything is soooooooo exciting and new to him outside. And that's great that he's interested in sniffing and exploring. Curiosity is a sign of intelligence. Dogs that don't do that or who are shy and scared don't turn out as well adjusted, imo. Dogs that are drivey, interested, exuberant busy bodies are fun to train. You just have to find out what motivates him in each situation.

    You'll just have to make yourself more fun and interesting than the ants or whatever else is happening. If he can concentrate on you, even for a few seconds, be sure and reinforce heavily for that. You can even use a word for when you give him permission to "go sniff." He can learn that there's a time to focus on you and also a time to have his fun.

    Inside the house, you can start teaching him to look at you. Eye contact = tid bit of chicken or steak. Wait for him to look at you on his own, click (if you're using a clicker) or use a marker word, like, "yesssss!" and treat. When he starts offering the behavior quite a lot, (because he'll connect that when he does, it pays off) start adding a cue, "Watch" or whatever you like. Reinforce for just a quick glance and gradually raise your criteria for duration.

    He's very young still and these things take time. Be sure and let him be a puppy and don't worry too much about perfection yet. Take baby steps and be very patient. As he matures, with your good training (reinforcing behavior you like, even baby steps) he'll turn out nicely. Poodles should be very adept at learning things. But it is my feeling that it's very important to let pups be pups and not take things too overly seriously. Have fun with your puppy.:)
     

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