Family dogs

Discussion in 'Dogs - General Dog Chat' started by Paige, Sep 4, 2013.

  1. Paige

    Paige Let it be

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    I know this may sound like an odd question but where the heck do you find a good family dog? Bandit is getting older (he is 9) and my boyfriend and I are discussing adding another dog sooner rather than later. We have a lot of children that are young. A lot of smaller rescues we are out because we have a current dog, cat and small children. Most dogs are not fit for that. Then add on I want an active younger but not a puppy that isn't small on top of it and we are narrowing down even more.

    So where do people who have other animals and kids actually get dogs? Breeders? The local pound? And what do you look for to ensure your dog is going to be good interacting with kids. Obviously training and supervision but some dogs aren't best suited to life with small children.
     
  2. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    I'd start researching breeds that you think might suit you and check out shelters/rescues. With your needs I would seek a dog in foster care to be sure they have an evaluation history.
     
  3. Southpaw

    Southpaw orange iguanas.

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    Of the 4 dogs I've had, all have been excellent "family dogs" - 2 from rescues (Molly & Happy) and 2 from breeders (Lucy & Juno). I have young nieces and nephews plus my mom does daycare, so it's always been super imperative that the dogs get along great with people.

    With Juno & Lucy I think it's helpful that they were raised surrounded by children. For Juno especially, from day 1 rules were in place regarding kids (no, you don't get to tackle them when they're running around). Boxers as a breed though tend to adore children, so there was never really a worry that she'd be bad with them, it was just about teaching her manners and how to control herself. With Lucy, sometimes I am amazed that she is so good with kids lol for her I really just think it's because she was raised around them.

    Molly was from a local shelter. Not a rescue. There were no pre-reqs to meet in order to adopt her. She was a complete gamble, we knew nothing about her and only met with her very briefly before deciding to adopt her. She was 7 months old when we got her. I don't know if it's luck that her personality was the way it was. Happy is from a rescue and her bio specifically said good with dogs, kids, and cats. I was upfront that those 3 things were a necessity and they didn't question me about it or act like it was a problem at all. She lived with a dog and a cat at her foster home, and I think the foster had grandkids or something, so I knew that she genuinely must be okay with them. Honestly though it was something where I was prepared to bring her back if she wasn't able to mesh well.

    Oh one of the things I made sure to ask Happy's foster was if she had shown ANY signs of resource guarding. You can label a dog "kid friendly" but I don't know if that necessarily means they won't react to a kid trying to take a toy away or something. (I also felt this was important to know since I was bringing her into a house with other dogs too).

    The short story is that you can get a great family dog anywhere. I actually feel like most dogs out there would fit the bill pretty well. I agree with deciding on what breeds you're interested in, and then scoping out breed specific rescues.
     
  4. meepitsmeagan

    meepitsmeagan Meagan & The Cattle Dog Crew

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    I would definitely start with rescues who have foster homes.
     
  5. Paige

    Paige Let it be

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    I have always been into herding dogs so another bc isn't ruled out but we have been talking about other breeds more so as his taste in dogs is different from mine.
     
  6. *blackrose

    *blackrose "I'm kupo for kupo nuts!"

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    All of my childhood dogs growing up were perfect "family dogs". One was a rescue adolescent, one was a pup from a stray we took in, and one was our neighbor's dog who chose to stay at our house *because* she loved children so much.

    Chloe was our first "non family friendly" dog. She was from an oops litter and we got her as a pup...she just has a very unstable temperament. And she's gotten to the point mom and I have discussed euthanasia in the future, especially if lifestyles start to change.

    Abrams is from a breeder and besides at the breeders has not lived with children, and I think he will make an awesome family dog whenever Mike and I do have kids. He LOVES kids, doesn't mind being handled in terms of poking, prodding, pulling, and pushing, and has no resource guarding issues period. Random loud noises and erratic behavior doesn't phase him, either.

    If it were me, I'd do as others have suggested. Research breeds, then look at a breed rescue (or shelter) who has dogs in foster care and have been tested with/live with kids. Heck, even check out craigslist - since they're private rehomes, you have a good chance of knowing how they act around children.
    Or, if you find a breeder you like, see if they have any young adult dogs they need to place, or can recommend someone who does.
     
  7. Flyinsbt

    Flyinsbt New Member

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    Wanting a larger young dog that isn't a puppy gives you a big pool to choose from, most shelters/rescues get tons of large adolescent dogs. I agree with Adrianne that your best bet is to go through a rescue that fosters, that way there shouldn't be any major surprises.
     
  8. Cardiparty

    Cardiparty New Member

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    I've always been told that Cardigans are iffy around kids, but actually mine are really great with the little one, if maybe too friendly and gushy around him.

    I know that some breeds really seem to just love kids; I know Newfies are one of them, and labs and goldens, too.

    Maybe I just lucked out with my girls?

    I've also heard that well bred pitties are one of the best breeds for kids, due to their high tolerance for both pain and silly humans. :)
     
  9. FG167

    FG167 New Member

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    Both of our girls are wonderful with children. Although mine can be a little too lick-y with really young kids.

    I will be adding either a Staffy or a rescue pittie on the next couple of years, I love them.
     
  10. Cardiparty

    Cardiparty New Member

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    Yeah, mine are that same way in regards to being just really kissy and sweet. They're really mushy around little ones.

    That's what I've had to work on most in terms of the kid/dog interaction is just that they just LOVE LOVE LOVE him and he needs space to explore the world and for some reason they think it's their job to be around him wherever he goes and whatever he does.
     
  11. Sit Stay

    Sit Stay Not a Border Collie

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    The dogs we had when I was quite young (2 Aussies and a Collie) were all purchased from breeders. They were all wonderful and patient dogs!

    When I was a little older, probably around 8 or 9, my mom started rescuing more. She'd pull herding breed dogs on the euthanasia list and rehome them. We had a couple go through that would have been suitable for a home with kids, so it definitely is possible. I do agree that you'd better your odds by going through a reputable rescue that puts dogs in foster homes though :)

    Or get an English Shepherd LOL! I so hope that Quinn is still around if/when I have kids. I was raised by the best dogs ever (I learned to walk by holding onto the Collie's coat to hold myself up, and he would sloooooowly walk around the house with me) and I want to give that to my kids.
     
  12. Paige

    Paige Let it be

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    There has been a lot of talk abt adding a pit bull. We aren't in a rush but I don't want all the kids to be teens before we add anpther. I think a breed rescue could work. Matbe I will contact some and see what their adopting process is like.
     
  13. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

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    I think its also important to say that the KIDS have to be taught to be good around the DOG as well. It can't all fall on the dog / owner, the guardian / caretaker of the kids must also pick up the slack in regards to management.

    poking, prodding pushing, pulling shouldn't be an issue because they shouldn't be allowed to happen.
     
  14. Paige

    Paige Let it be

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    I think you also have to take into consideration things happen. My kids ignore bandit 90% of the time but he as accidentally been poked, prodded, woken up from sleeping etc. No one is being a butt to him on purpose that's life with kids.
     
  15. Toller_08

    Toller_08 Active Member

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    None of my childhood dogs came from ideal places, but all of the dogs we had growing up were excellent family dogs. And none of them came from the greatest of places (rehomes, bybs). But thankfully all of them were just really patient, stable, nice dogs and my mom put a lot of time and training into them, and I think also just growing up around my brother and I helped the few puppies we had grow into kid friendly dogs. And we were also really good dog kids, but still, I think those dogs would have been good family dogs regardless.

    Now as an adult, to increase my chances of success, I'd seek out either a well bred puppy, an adult dog from a breeder if it was a possibility, or a dog from a reputable rescue organization who has been fostered. Basically, I'd seek out a dog from somebody with a lot of experience and knowledge of their dogs, be it a rescue or a breeder.

    Also: It might not always be typical for the breed depending on where the dog is from/how it was raised/what kind of lines, but Journey would be an amazing family dog. She is incredible with kids and situations in general. I chalk that all up to good genetics with some help from me as far as raising goes. But seriously, one of the best kid dogs I've ever been around, and easily puts up with the hustle and bustle of child activity as well. I don't plan on having kids anytime even close to the near future, if ever at this point, but if I ever do, I hope that she is still around. She'd be such a wonderful dog to raise kids around.

    And totally off topic, but I saw this after my reply and I am pretty sure that Journey and Quinn are the same dog in different suits haha. So many things sound so similar.
     
  16. Cardiparty

    Cardiparty New Member

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    DOG ABUSE!!!!! :rofl1:

    Toddlers are just so freakin' fast!!!! My little guy's new thing is holding on to the dogs' tails and toddling behind them giggling like a maniac as they walk. The only thing it does is prevent them from wagging, thank God.

    And we DO discourage that, but stuff happens.
     
  17. Paige

    Paige Let it be

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    Lol I step on him a fair bit too. Bad me

    But I do agree yo need t be aware of your kids and teach them good manners to the animals.,
     
  18. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

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    I wasn't referencing the "stuff happens" variable. I was emphising that not everyone reins in their kids like "real" dog people they just expect the dog to "take it". It you give the dog rules, the kid needs to have rules too.
     
  19. drmom777

    drmom777 Bloody but Unbowed

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    Consider a coonhound . Most people don't, but they are social, patient, thoroughly non-temperamental, and will take a lot more from kids than the average dog, and happily at that.

    Uncle Fred was great with kids- and because of his early life he was ver serious and gentle about it. Garnett is a big goof- and lives to wrestle with the kids and make crazy hound noises at them. My kids adore him- and so do all the kids around here including the severely artistic boy up the block.

    At eight months he plays frisbee with anyone who's willing, lives happily with six cats, gets along with other dogs. He does, however like to use that voice. And he has a lot more vocal variety than Uncle Fred did.
     
  20. Paige

    Paige Let it be

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    Oh totally. I have been on this forum awhile (well before having kids) and have learned a lot both from here and living with animals + kids. It's always a good message to repeat though. It's a two way street like any other relationship. Both needs to have rules and respect for each other.
     

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