English Shephers

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by Hespa, Oct 30, 2012.

  1. Hespa

    Hespa Guest

    English Shepherds

    I have been doing some research on this breed. The one question that we have not found an answer to is - is this breed apt to chase cars, trucks, etc. because of their herding traits? Years ago we had Shelties and that was one thing they just thought they needed to do. If an English Shepherd is taught that is not allowed as a puppy, will they not give in to temptation later on?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 30, 2012
  2. monkeys23

    monkeys23 New Member

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    How about don't have your dog loose around cars no matter what breed it is. I mean, its a dog not a person and they should not be expected to know not to chase cars...
     
  3. Hespa

    Hespa Guest

    We are on a farm. The dog needs to be able to stroll around the farm to keep an eye on anything that is not the way it should be or persons entering barns to steal tools, gas, etc. We have two sets of buildings on 150 acres and unfortunately a road disections our farm.
     
  4. stafinois

    stafinois Professional Nerd

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    My in-laws' ES was a car chaser. You can imagine why she's no longer with us.
     
  5. *blackrose

    *blackrose "I'm kupo for kupo nuts!"

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    I really think it depends on the dog, honestly. In my experience, the dogs that chase cars view the cars as "trespassers" and are bored. I imagine if the pup is used to cars constantly coming and going and has plenty to do (and perhaps trained very strongly to avoid cars/the road) it would be okay. Never 100% though. Even if the dog isn't chasing cars, but happens to be in the road at the wrong time...dead dog.

    Our dogs chased cars they viewed as a territorial threat. They would chase them to the edge of our property and then stop and come back. I think, IMO, if you are wanting to avoid a car chasing dog it is going to have a lot more to do with training and a lot less to do with breed.
     
  6. Sit Stay

    Sit Stay Not a Border Collie

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    I am going to very carefully say that they are less prone to movement reactivity than some BCs and some ACDs. However I strongly agree that it's less about breed tendency and more about the individual and training. I would hope you would be very careful with your puppy and not expect it to know better without good training and management.
     
  7. OutlineACDs

    OutlineACDs Crazy Dog!

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    This exactly. My dogs are not car chasers per say. They won't chase cars when I'm with them, or they are on lead, or working out in the yards, but when left out in our fenced dog yard, they will run up and down the fence and bark at cars. They are bored and it's something to do.

    If you're looking for a breed of dog to watch over your farm and be a guard dog I'd look into a different breed. LGD's were meant to do exactly as described, patrol the farm, guard livestock, etc. I'm pretty sure an English Shepherd is more of an all purpose farm dog, and would require a bit more family time and individual training to keep it occupied.
     
  8. Kilter

    Kilter New Member

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    It's a training thing, not a 'gee, I hope the pup doesn't pick up the habit' thing. Any dog will learn to chase a vehicle if they have the option and nothing else to do. Dogs chase.

    A lgd would be a better choice, as would proper gates and locks on buildings. An invisible fence for the property so they don't wander, a secure dog run for when you are not around or need them put out of the way (for putting down pesticides etc.) are things to start getting in place now.
     
  9. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    Chasing cars is not herding. Any herding dog who cannot tell that a car is not a sheep has bigger problems than just the fact that he chases cars.

    I've owned nine herding dogs over the past 12 years and have spent a lot of time around other herding dog owners and not one that I knew was a car chaser.
     
  10. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

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    I have known quite a few herding breed dogs who were car chasers. BCs,Aussies, ACDs, Corgis, Belgians and well...Savvy certainly has the tendency. Come to of it, most car chasers I have known have been herding breedsalthough Savvy is the first I have had who thought about it. I would say it is because they "think cars are sheep" but herding breed dogs are wired to be motion sensitive and interested in controlling movement so it isn't all that far fetched to think some would develop car chasing issues if given the opportunity.
     
  11. monkeys23

    monkeys23 New Member

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    I had an LGD chase my car as I was leaving my parent's house last weekend. What if it'd been some douche hunter from the valley or something that like to speed through that area?

    Riding with my friend's hubby to go see her, we almost hit a different LGD in a different ranch area that was chasing cars on the highway. Apparently the cars on the highway were more engaging than his flock of sheep. I notice they no longer have an LGD with the flock....

    Any breed of dog can chase cars. ;)
     
  12. LostAndConfused

    LostAndConfused Active Member

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    My English Shepherd pup is certainly interested in the cars. He is always on a leash (yard not currently fenced), but he watches them. I definitely think that he would chase cars if given the chance, especially if he is unsupervised
     
  13. MafiaPrincess

    MafiaPrincess Obvious trollsare Obvious

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    Even if the puppy didn't chase cars.. I'd be worried that you expect your dog to stroll I assume both sides of that road. Even if it doesn't chase cars, it may still be hit by one. Sounds like you could use an alarm system, not an animal.
     
  14. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    Being turned on and responding to movement is a prey drive thing and far from exclusive to herding.

    Herding is simply a matter of channeled prey drive when used to control specific other species.
     

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