Ego Vs. Safety - Kikopup Video

Discussion in 'Dogs - General Dog Chat' started by MandyPug, Apr 10, 2013.

  1. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    As I said in the sentence previously, I do like her videos in general. her training videos are simple, I like them, I recommended them to people and watch them pretty often. So every once in a while these kinds of videos pop up. I watch them because sometimes there are potentially interesting training methods or ideas in them.
    Shying away and turning off anything that could potentially annoy me really isn't how I usually go about things, especially when I'm trying to learn. I don't know a lot about dog training, so I tend to kind of try and soak in anything I can.

    I am not ANGRY or honestly upset by these videos at all.
    They grind my gears a bit sometimes, they do tend to veer towards the extreme.. but not enough to honestly be upsetting or make me turn it off in a flourish :rofl1:

    I watch them because even if they kind of rub me the wrong way sometimes, I do USUALLY learn something new.
    I mean, not so much with this video.. but usually.
     
  2. sillysally

    sillysally Obey the Toad.

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    I really am not seeing the big deal with this video, it seems like common sense to me. Make sure your dog is conditioned, weigh the benefits and risks, evaluate if your dog has the physical make up/ability to do an activity.

    This is something that is commonly discussed with horses. If you want your horse to do a certain strenuous activity and stay sound for years you make sure the horse has the correct confo and conditioning for said activity and know when enough is enough. If a horse say, refuses jumps repeatedly, the first thing that most trainers recommend is to make sure the horse isn't refusing due to physical pain.

    She is not telling people to never do anything fun with their dogs, she is just recommending people use their brains when they do it. Plus, many dogs don't know their limits physically and WILL work through pain. Jack has DJD in his elbow due to elbow dysplasia. He had surgery when he was 10 months and it took him years to figure out his limits, and often he still has to be reined in. I also agree that having your dog do downs where they are repeatedly slamming their elbows onto hard ground is not good for the joints. Jack's physical therapy vet also advised to that doing things that would repeatedly stress his front legs with repetitive jumping, slamming down, etc, was not good for him, so I choose not to even attempt agility with him. I would gladly do agility with future dog though. It's not about wrapping a dog in bubble wrap, it's about taking the individual dogs physical condition into account when doing physically demanding activities.
     

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