Dont put your puppy in a cargo hold!!!

Discussion in 'Dog Health Care' started by coopervane, Jan 16, 2007.

  1. coopervane

    coopervane New Member

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    Well, sorry if I wrote it as if I were using scare tactics, just saw it too many times last week. I am fed up with the lack of concern.

    To be fair, it DOES depend on what aircraft you are flying on. I fly the 50 seat CRJ, which is THE worst for noise. A larger aircraft would definitely be better for the animal. But the growing utilization of these RJ's only increases your chances of flying on one.

    Also to be fair, I have only seen this abuse in Atlanta/PHL/ORD and not at smaller airports. But I see it almost every day. I'm not making this stuff up.

    Several posters have commented that they have shipped and "no worse for wear" but how do you know. Is it O.K. for your Groomer to abuse your dog as long as you don't see it?

    I agree with Rottweiler, don't let some anonymous poster like me unduly influence you. Do your own research, ask lots of questions. But I would never let any animal of mine ride in cargo.

    All I'm saying, is be aware. There are times when you MUST ship. But not puppies/kittens. And not for a casual trip.

    My company used to issue reports about how many animals we killed per month. Yea!!, only 2 this month. We stopped posting those reports. Maybe steer clear of Atlanta and you'll be fine?
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2007
  2. IliamnasQuest

    IliamnasQuest Loves off-leash training!

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    Well, personally I think this topic has been sensationalized. Living in Alaska, people end up flying their pets all the time. I worked for a vet for six years and wrote hundreds and hundreds of health certificates for shipping. Not once in those six years did anyone lose a dog on a flight or even complain about trauma - in fact, many of those people flew numerous times with their dogs.

    Show dog people fly their dogs out to shows all the time from Alaska. I'm on an Alaska dog show email list and people are always talking about going to the various national shows, Eukanuba show, etc. I generally drive out, but that takes upwards of five days (took me six days to St. Louis one year) and most people fly out. I haven't seen anyone posting about a problem with flying.

    I've flown with dogs a few times. I hate it because I'm a nervous wreck. The dogs have always done fine - I'm the one that fainted on a flight due to stress and exhaustion!

    I've had three dogs shipped up to me via airlines. One showed up scared to death, but she was a five month old dog with next to no socialization and who had not been acclimated to a kennel (I found this out AFTER I got her). The other two, at eight weeks old, showed up as happy and bouncy and confident as I could want. Khana was 12 hours in transit from Ontario, Canada to Anchorage, Alaska. My next puppy will be shipped up from Texas.

    Yes, there will be an occasional problem. But it's rare, not common, in my experience. If a dog is social, confident, stable and is used to a crate (which, in my opinion, all dogs should be) then there is no reason to think that they won't handle a trip just fine. If they get jostled about a bit by a handler - well, I don't approve of it, but I jostle them around in their kennels and follow that with treats so they're used to a bit of rough handling. Every single time I've traveled with my dogs, I've stood at the window and was able to see their kennels arrive at the cargo hold. Most of the time I've seen them loaded, and never once did I see them get tossed around or handled harshly. When I board the plane, I immediately tell the stewardess that I have dogs traveling too and I ask for confirmation that they're on board - and then I don't sit down and buckle my seat belt until they tell me. If the plane starts to move and I haven't been told yet, I continue to stand (which irritates the stewardesses, but it does get results .. *L*). Most of the time the captain reports on the loudspeaker that the dogs are on board.

    So, if a person is a bit proactive and does the right things, then travel for the dog isn't generally traumatic as it's being made out to be. I have no doubt that more dogs are injured/killed/traumatized in car wrecks than in travel by air - even if we do it by percentage, I'd be willing to bet that car travel is far higher a risk.

    Melanie and the gang in Alaska
     
  3. jason_els

    jason_els New Member

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    This leads to the question of flying the dog as an underseat carry-on.

    What are the rules about this? Say if I were to go out and collect a puppy in person, could I bring it back with me? I'm speaking only of travel within the USA. Have security restrictions stopped this? Do I have to put my puppy through an X-ray machine?

    Flying these days is dreadful no matter where you are. Southwest appears to make money while all the others are hanging on by a thread and if that's the case, they'll do anything to save money. I barely trust them with my checked luggage, why should I trust them with my dog?

    I've been in planes stuck on the ground for hours, landed at unscheduled airports, experienced an air pocked so severe people with thrown not only out of their seats, but even out of the lavatories! Ever been on a plane with landing gear failure? I have!

    No way is driving cruel for a dog. You can make stops for exercise, food, and have a nice hotel room to stay in at night. Cars have climate control so you can make it warm or cold, and all the dogs I've had love to ride in the car and meet people along the way. Certainly beats being stuck in plastic box in a strange place with questionable air, temperature, noise levels, and handling. To say nothing if they misplace the dog and it ends-up god-knows-where.

    I'd feel better if I could accompany a small under-the-seat dog if only because I know it's much more comfortable for him.
     
  4. Phoenix the Dog

    Phoenix the Dog New Member

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    I agree with a little bit of what everyone has said. While accidents are rare compared to the amount of animals that fly, I agree with cooper by stating that you just shouldn't take the chance if you have other options. I think all cooper was attempting to do is to raise awareness in some of the problems that come with flying. People tend to be naive and assume because airlines see pets all the time they are treated perfectly, but they are not. Some airline companies refuse to accept pets on flights at all, because they are a hassle and there are many uncontrollable issues that could happen and result in lawsuits. Just look at some of the airline policies, Southwest doesn't fly pets at all Southwest, US Airways doesn't allow animals at hub cities or cities with extreme temperatures US Airways, and Delta's pet requirements should also say something about the temperatures:

    "Pug or snub-nosed dogs and cats are not hot-weather animals and therefore do not thrive in warm temperatures. As a precaution, Delta will not accept them as checked baggage or as air cargo if the temperature on any part of their trip exceeds 70 degrees F." Delta

    Delta's regulations don't say how high the temperatures will get and we all know 70F doesn't kill most cats or pugs... The biggest problem is temperature extremes and changes in temperatures. Remember a 'precaution' to an airline is usually their way of preventing a lawsuit, not them caring about the welfare of your pet. To big business it is all about $$$.

    I think it is a good idea to raise awareness about pets on flights. It would be great to see 20/20 do an undercover story and see how they really are treated and on different airlines. No one really knows for sure except the pets, and maybe they are so happy and glad to see you because they just wanted OUT! I just know about airplanes, I'm an aerospace engineering student, and they do undergo extreme temperature changes in cargo holds which could be deadly... Make sure if you fly your pet to tell the crew, pilots do actually have control of the temperature in cargo on most aircraft and as for the ground crew, there isn't much to do except avoid major hubs where they are busy and rush around. Do lots of research before shipping your pup, there aren't any (FAA) regulations out there so make sure they are safe and as RED said insure them for lots, b/c it will make the airline 'want' to take extra care of the animal.
     
  5. midnightbirdgirl

    midnightbirdgirl New Member

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    WE had a great experience when our puppy was shipped to us from Florida, to California last June.
    Just though I would let you all know it isn't all bad.
    MBG
     
  6. Cimorene

    Cimorene New Member

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    This is a little extreme....

    I also lived in Alaska for many years, and while I admit it is a different world, i.e., the airport and its employees become friends, because we all flew so much, (and EVERYONE has dogs) I don't think it's a good idea to judge all airlines the same. We flew across country with our dogs a couple of times, and when we left we had our cat under our seats. None of them begged to do it again (the cat hunkered down for the entire time and refused to talk about it), but they did okay. And Alaska Airlines won't fly dogs if the temperature in the cargo hold is going to be below 40, as I recall. We were afraid we wouldn't be able to get them home, but all was well, and we felt that our animals were treated well.
     
  7. mrose_s

    mrose_s BusterLove

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    ehh. we have always flown our pets with us. so i don't think we shoudl do that again. thanks for the info. does anyone have a site where i could find out more?

    i guess we will get dogtainers now if we can't drive ourselves. plus i don't think QANTAS would be veray happy us sitting there with our 4 dogs (12kg, 20kg, 25kg and 45kg) and a cat onboard.
     
  8. prouddobemom

    prouddobemom New Member

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    My husband works for Delta and he assured me that they are well taken care of blah blah blah. When we got out recent addition to the family in January I flew all the way to Iowa myself and had her in a soft carrier with me during the flight. Why? Although I am sure some employees may be considered most of them do not care. Have you ever seen the way baggage is handled? Thrown sometimes feet across to land in a bin? If it were their personal property it would not be handled like that. I agree!!! Do not send your puppy in cargo!!!
     
  9. Cindi-Dobe

    Cindi-Dobe New Member

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    I wonder if a veterinarian prescribed sedative would be the solution?

    My Mother adopted a stray a few years back and her dog was PETRIFIED of riding in the car. Her dog would have such panic attacks while traveling it was so pitiful. On a 8 hour car trip, her Vet prescribed a sedative tablet that she gave about an hour before the trip.....she basically slept the entire car trip. Woke up about 20 minutes after they arrived (safe and sound in my Mom's lap).

    The only things the pill would not work for would be the
    temperature problem and / or the rough handling of the crate.
     
  10. prouddobemom

    prouddobemom New Member

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    Yeah my Rosco just started "accepting" car rides. He is not fond of them at all, he pants on and off but is much better than a year ago (he would scratch the floor and cry).

    What I said before, that was just my opinion is all, it is very unsual that something go wrong but it can. My dogs are my babies so I am overly protective of them. :)
     
  11. george656

    george656 Member

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    Our Dog Bruno did very well when flew from Toronto, Ontario Canada to Porto, Portugal even though I was really worried about him. When we got him from the airport he was shaking alot and his water dish had been knocked over. Other than that he survived through the whole flight very well.
     
  12. BlackPuppy

    BlackPuppy Owned by Belgians

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    Just want to add:

    "Unless recommended and prescribed by your own veterinarian, one who knows your dog's medical history, do not sedate your dog for air travel. Sedatives or tranquilizers, combined with high altitude can cause breathing difficulties. This is especially true for any snub-nosed breed. A dog's balance can also be compromised by sedatives."
     
  13. CountryGrl

    CountryGrl Me

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    Please note the references on this article


    I just recently got a puppy and the breeder that I was dealing with was all the way across country from me so I was going to have to have the puppy shipped. I did a lot of research on it and here's what I found.


    First of all there are new FAA regulations on shipping dogs. In the later part of 1998, the FAA made new rulings, pertaining to flying live animals and plants. The cargo room where they fly, must have the same air, that is flowing in the cabin with the passengers. When the Airlines tell you that they will not ship dogs in over 85 degrees, or under 20 degrees, that is NOT because of the temperature on the airplane. That is because they do not want the dog being on the little transportation cart, on the tarmac, going from the plane to the terminal, in those temperatures. Continental and some of the others are now starting to use air-conditioned and heated buses to carry the dogs from the airplanes to the terminals.

    Most airlines cut pug nosed dogs off if the temp is going to be over 75.


    Because my puppy came in July I ended up getting a different puppy from a different breeder. There was just no way to get a dog on the ground in July in NC. Instead I drove 7 hours to KY and got one.


    I read a lot on shipping dogs via airlines and a lot of the rescue places ship dogs all over the world. You wouldn't believe the number of dogs and cats flying around. :D
     
  14. squirtsmom

    squirtsmom New Member

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    Interesting posts, everybody. still don't want to fly my dogs in cargo.
     
  15. MafiaPrincess

    MafiaPrincess Obvious trollsare Obvious

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    I had a pup shipped from NC in July. Heat really wasn't an issue. It was continental dropping the ball repeatedly, canceling his second flight, refusing to do anything about it.. The non english speaking jerks at the cargo desk who wouldn't hand over my puppy with out a world class fit... And then continental's pet complaints person not returning my calls.

    That all makes me not want to ship again. Their quickpak service though should be phenomenal for moving your animal from point a to b.. it's all the rest of it that's apparently an issue.
     
  16. LB2007

    LB2007 Guest


    I HAD TO SHIP a Pomeranian full grown from midwest USA to Europe central. When he arrived with me on the same flight but he in cargo hold as AMERICAN airlines wont have it any other way. I was shocked to see his condition and how terrified he was, he pooped in his crate, was soaking wet from pee and all his water. there was NO more food in his crate, bowl was removed from door where it was supposed to be attached to.The poor animal suffered teremendously. I will never do that again. i will pay a higher price to take him on board and fly with a European carrier as they allow this.
     
  17. corgi_love

    corgi_love New Member

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    Regis was flown to me from NC. Not exactly a drive I could make, from CA to NC, hehe. But he did really great. We had to changed the date twice because of weather, but other than that it all went smoothly. And he wasn't tramatized, either.
     
  18. jennakat111786

    jennakat111786 New Member

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    im overprotective of my puppy anyways so i would carry her on board with me no matter what... there would be no way i would put her precious little life in a strangers hands... its hard enough to leave her at the vet or the groomers... i dont trust other people with my baby bc they dont love her like i do therefore they wont take care of her the way i do...
     
  19. PoodleMommy

    PoodleMommy Yorkie Love

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    I know this an old post, but since it was brought up I figured I would answer it incase anyone was wondering the same thing.

    When you get to security, you remove the dog from the carrier and they walk through the metal detector with you while their bag goes through the xray machine... then on the other side they are loaded back into their bag.

    And dont worry I have never seen a dog strip searched:D:lol-sign:
     
  20. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    I managed to cause quite a stir at the metal detector when I flew with Athena - a lab/afghan cross. She was allowed to ride in the cabin as a SAR dog (some airlines do this as a courtesy).

    We get to the metal detectors, I empty my pockets and put everything in the little bowl, I put my bag on the conveyor, Athena and I walk through the metal detector. It goes off. Mind ya, this is Thanksgiving Day, the first T-day after 9/11. Security is a bit wound tight but is lacking direction ~ basically they have absolutely no idea what to do next.

    They get the wand to go over me and the dog. Someone comes over and asks if they inspected the dog..."Well, yes. I visually inspected the dog." Did you check under the dog's collar? "I visually inspected the dog's collar. But did you check under the collar? You need to check under the collar. "I'm not allowed to touch the dog. How do I check under the collar without touching the dog?" This continued for about a minute...
    :lol-sign:

    They finally find the offending piece of foil from the cigarette pack that had gotten stuck at the bottom of my pocket. By then they're getting worried that someone might step on Athena's tail - her butt hadn't ever stopped wiggling, she loved all the attention she was getting, and they almost let me take the bowl with the coins and keys just to get me out of there.
     

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