Dominant Dogs

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by neko48604, May 29, 2008.

  1. neko48604

    neko48604 New Member

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    In the last couple of month, mostly over winter, my dog has been very Dominant over everything. It didn't bother me much at the beginning but now he becoming Dominant over me.He a very well train dog he listen to everything I say. I been doing a lot of stuff with him like walking every day, taking him out side and playing with him, but once he get in the house it starts all over again. I even try not letting him up on the bed or the couch without being call up. Like the other day my step dad and I was playing and he just start jumping up and biting at both of us. in the car its even worse. People walk by the car and he goes crazy. I can't even keep the window in the back down a little because he will start to push the window down. He is a Lab/Chow and just turn 4 in march..
     
  2. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    I, along with most people on here don't call any of this stuff dominance, he's simply not trained or well mannered. I dominant dog over people is very rare. If you give me more examples I can help with specifics, does he guard food, toys etc.? For jumping up I'll recommend what I usually do for all jumpers, when he jumps turn your back and cross your arms and completley ignore him. Don't look at him, touch him or talk to him. once he calm down for a few seconds turn back around and pay attention to him, then continue whatever you were doing. Do this every time. When you and your step-dad were playing, what were you playing exactly, that could tell me why he was jumping. He could have wanted to play, or could have been jealous of the attention you were giving your step-dad.
    f he goes crazy when people walk past the car he is either guarding it or is excited by the people and frustrated he cannot meet them. What is he normally like when he greets people? Does he get over excited or is he calm? If he is calm normally when greeting he is most likely guarding. On a normal car ride, if he des not see people, is he ok with the car or is he stressed. answer those questions and I'll be able to help you more. What other things does he do that you would like to stop? Also remember, since you said he istens to yor commmands, to tell him what to do instead of what not to do. If he is jumping for something command him to do something (like sitting) that prevents him from doing the undesirable behavior.
     
  3. Angelique

    Angelique New Member

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    Howdy!

    I would say (IMOAE) that roughly 95% of those who oppose, and 50% of those who support the reality of social concepts when it comes to living with dogs as family members do not understand the meaning and proper application of the word "dominant".

    It sounds like maybe you've been watching Cesar Millan's show and have become confused. If this is true and you are interested in sharing information with others who are also interested in his philosophies, you might try his yahoo fan site. Do a google search of "Dog Whisperer Fans" and you should find some groups who welcome conversations about his methods and philosophies. :D

    Dominant and subordinant positions are not generally adversarial, as some would lead you to believe. Think of them as positions on the same team.

    However, a dog doing what they please, with you reacting to their behavior rather than the other way around tells me that the dog is leading the activities and making the decisions with you reacting after the fact.

    This may indicatate a void in leadership which the dog is filling. Bottom line, in a dog's mind "someone" has to be in charge. Most dogs only take the dominant role because the owner's behavior, attitude, and demeanor is stating loud and clear..."I am a subordinant being".

    So, where does this leave the dog? :yikes:

    I wish you luck. Feel free to pm me if you have any additional questions. :)
     
  4. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    Great advice from Maxy. I agree, more specifics would help us figure out how to help. I also believe only about 1% of dogs are actually "domanant" over humans, it's usually used to explain just bad manners. Instead of thinking of your dog being dominant, try to think of it in terms of individual behaviors - when he jumps, deal with the jumping; when he growls, deal with the growling; when he bites, deal with the biting, etc. We can definately help you with the specific behaviors you want to deal with, and Maxy of course started doing that. Please let us know what else you need help to deal with.
     
  5. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    Sorry, Angelique, posted at the same time.
     
  6. Angelique

    Angelique New Member

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    No problemo! ;)
     
  7. adojrts

    adojrts New Member

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    I would put this dog on Nothing In Life Is Free, asap. Make him earn everything including his meals, play, walks, toys and affection etc. And no sofa's or beds, that may or may not be allowed later, depends on how responsive he is and whether he understands the rules.
     
  8. release the hounds

    release the hounds Active Member

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    let's not get caught up in semantics, as it stands right now, the dog is dominating the situation, and the handler does not have control. I agree with the NILF, the dog must work for everything, food, playtime, affection everything. and in the meantime, manage the situations you put him in to keep everyone, including yourself and your dog safe.
     
  9. Brattina88

    Brattina88 Active Member

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  10. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    There is no evidence, to date what domestic dogs' hierarchy is. There is speculation, opinions, observations, but no scientific proof. Learning behavior is proven.

    If a dog doesn't resist you taking a toy away from him, is that because he's not dominant? Maybe he doesn't care about the toy. If there is one bone between two dogs and one takes it away from the other, does that mean that dog is the more dominant? Maybe the other dog doesn't care that much about the bone at that time. Maybe he just had a big meal and is full.

    My own dogs may be pushy about some things and not about others. The same things can change depending on the situation or various times. They all were pushy in the beginning about different things. They'd all cram up against the door when they wanted to go out. I didn't use any special demeanor or intimidation, force or show 'em who's boss attitude. I taught them to sit away from the door and wait until released to go out the door. It was a quick lesson by simply removing the possibility of them going out the door (the reinforcer) until they sat and waited. Then they got reinforced by getting to go outside as long as they sat and waited....a very short duration at first and gradually increasing, then varying the duration.

    Obedience training goes a long way in getting compliance. Control the dog's resources...control the dog. Bone up on learning behavior. Google Clicker Solutions for some specific help. Read Culture Clash by Jean Donaldson or The Power of Positive Training, by Pat Miller. Forget Cesar Milan. He doesn't know behavior. He controls by intimidation and force.

    Dogs do what works....for them. Make what you want work for your dog instead of fighting it and getting into a power struggle. You'll get much further with less wear and tear on the dog.

    Learning behavior works every time whether you have a certain "demeanor" or not. Reinforcement of wanted behavior and prevention, distraction and giving alternatives when a dog is about to engage in unwanted behavior teaches a dog the behaviors we want. There are more specifics than that, but that's the gist.

    Dogs' culture is different than ours and what is not wanted by humans is perfectly normal to dogs. It's a communication thing, not an attitude thing. Dominance or taking over our world is not what they have in mind.

    Scientific parsimony states that the simplest answers should be sought first before coming to a conclusion. Learning theory is the simplest solution to understanding dogs and pack theory is much more complicated and grossly misinterpreted. True pack behavior is very specialized and using that to explain the behavior of a scavenging and occasional packing animal is incorrect. Labeling a dog as dominant without searching for simpler reasons for behavior is not utilizing parsimony and therefore pathetically flawed.
     
  11. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    ^^^^Doberluv - :hail:
     

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