Dogo Argentino possibly in the future

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by Dogdragoness, Apr 25, 2013.

  1. JessLough

    JessLough Love My Mutt

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    This.

    After spending thousands of dollars and having one imported from a wonderful breeder in Italy and having to euth at 6 months, I'd be very, very careful about where any corsos are coming from, and making sure I have plenty saved up for health issues that crop up.
     
  2. Danefied

    Danefied New Member

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    I was just going to say, everything else aside, finding a good breeder is going to be tough. Finding a good breeder who would sell to someone who thinks ACD experience prepares them is going to be just about impossible.
     
  3. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

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    this decision is in its infancy ... if I decide at any time that neither of these breeds would be a fit for me then that would be ok, I also have contacts with a few really good ACD breeders.

    I dont consider it a failure to admit that a breed isnt for me, but I certainly want to guive a breed a chance before vetoing it
     
  4. Whitewave

    Whitewave New Member

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    I don't know you or any one else on here for that matter, but I do know Dogos. And if you can't handle the questions and statements in this thread, then you surely can NOT handle a Dogo. I've been on the Dogo board for 15 yrs and let me tell you real Dogo people are as tough as the Dogos themselves and will argue and never cave on their opinions! The DACA has changed hands and members so much that I quit following it!

    There are plenty of people that will sell a Dogo to anybody with cash even so called good breeders, just b/c they show and have ribbons doesn't make them a good breeder. But many sadly end up dying in shelter before they are 2 yrs of age b/c the person couldn't handle them and the breeder is no where to be found. Last foster was a 10 month old puppy, full registration papers, BAER test and everything. Owner paid $$$ for him and shipping to boot. But couldn't handle him anymore. He had no obedience training no training of any kind really and was totally out of a control. A 100lb puppy that did what he wanted when he wanted and pitched a fit if he couldn't do it. I have handled many dogs, but the strength of this one was a force to be reckoned with. I could not even safely walk him by myself. He ended up having to go to another foster home with a large man who was better able to control him and ended up keeping him. But even that, he had to have surgery to repair a torn bicep when the dog busted the front storm door down and went after a loose dog in the yard and he tackled him to stop him!
     
  5. Aescleah

    Aescleah New Member

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    Hummm
    you are the pack the pack is you. i dont have a dogo or a corso however i have two jug heads that are guardian type dogs, but everyone who said it travels right down the leash was right. these dogs read you like a book in large print, and they will act on what they think is right, before you can say sit boy.
    Also prey drive is serious bisness imagine, walking down the road a little dog is walking on the other side of the road, your dog sees it you do not. your dog charges out either gets hit by a car or gets across the street and gets the small dog. it happened so fast all you have time for is to blink, cause your dog ripped the leash out of your hand. he did not think about it he just did it. if you are a weak leader he is not going to look to you for guidence thats a very hard instinct to override in the best of times if at all.

    these dogs are a very serious reponsibility the learn curve is pretty steep. when most novices finish their research they are so sure of how to do everything then the problems come in the owners who refuse to learn lose there dogs the good owners learn from there mistakes and fix the problem they most likely caused if you really do get a dogo or corso which i am not sure is a good idea research yes get a very good breeder and keep a open mind maybe the best thing to learn is whats a good idea verses bad alpha rolling bad
    othing in life for free good get a mentor if you can and use common sense. btw there is a balance with domince/positive training for people with guardian breeds really must leanyou cant be a tyrant nor a marsmellow

    Ashley
     
  6. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    Ignoring the drama in this thread:

    I don't typically recommend a protective type guardian breed, ESPECIALLY such a powerful molosser, to anyone who has any kind of anxiety, social or otherwise. Mental state passes quickly from a handler to a dog, and certain breeds (usually the smarter, more one-person type dogs) pick it up faster, and a molosser with any kind of instability without a VERY experienced handler is going to become very dangerous very quickly. People with anxiety sometimes do look towards these breeds for protection and to feel "safer" but honestly, any large dog is going to do just as good of a job dissuading unwanted company, and nobody should be getting a dog like this for protection without YEARS of experience in handling them for other purposes.

    That said, I don't think nobody with anxiety is capable of handling a dog like a dogo or corso - lots of people on this thread do so. But before you look into a breed like this, I think you need to be able to function (and do some comfortably) normally in social settings like clubs, classes, and public to socialize your puppy.

    I've only met one Dogo, and from what I can tell, he was EXTREMELY watered dog. He was an apartment dog, and let people approach and pet him quite calmly in public, so I'm not sure that's the norm. However, I've known a few corsos.

    All I can say is go meet some. Email local breeders and say you're interested in learning more about the breed, can you come and visit. Try to find a show, and especially if interested in bitework or PP, a club to visit many times before deciding what breed to bring home. ACD experience isn't going to TOUCH preparing you to own a dogo or even a corso. There's a very good reason you don't see these dogs walking down the street all the time. They are way too much for most people, including incredibly dog savvy people, to handle. They're not even all that common in bite sports, because even for people who participate in those sports and lead that lifestyles, they are an awful lot of dog.

    The reasons you're listing in this thread make me believe you might be better suited to a breed like a rottie, GSD, or maybe some kind of less "intense" mastiff like an English or Bullmastiff.
     
  7. frostfell

    frostfell Kung Pow Fish

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    Im intrigued by your assertion that Corso are unstable. I was thinking of getting some myself, down the road when I have a farm for them to guard

    What is unstable about them? Im gonna be bummered if I have to pick a different guard breed :c
     
  8. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

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    I think it is also worth mentioning that I would also be open to a rescue corso/dogo/ mastiff. I have seen menu groups on Facebook that I have friended & plan to contact when the time comes.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2013
  9. crazedACD

    crazedACD Active Member

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    I think that if you 'have to have' one of these breeds this would be a better option, as you will be able to better ascertain the temperament as an adult. You might be able to find those flukes where the dog is more suited to you. You would just have to be open to the people in the rescue assisting in finding the right dog, not insist on the one that is prettiest or whatever.
     
  10. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

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    Don't worry ... I don't mind a "face only mother could love" as long as the temperment matches mine ... Not shot looks. I go for the dog that "clicks", not the prettiest.

    I have friended a rescue group on Facebook that helps dogos, corsi & other mastiffs.
     
  11. Sapphire-Light

    Sapphire-Light woof!

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    I agree wit this opinion.

    To the OP, have you thought on fostering first a milder temperament dog? maybe you can try to foster one of the breeds that were described before in this thread like a Dobe, rottie, etc.. then you can have an idea of what a dogo or a corso could be.

    Or you can volunteer in a dogo or corso rescue place before taking one home.
     
  12. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

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    Yes, that is also an option
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2013
  13. Sapphire-Light

    Sapphire-Light woof!

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    That is a wise option, you see I have met some dobes from south american show lines, and they do have very strong DA.

    Mostly a brown female I met, she was hard to deal wit even for an owner wit experience in dobes.. sadly her wild temperament got her in trouble and she died in an accident.

    However I also met one of those flukes, a male who is very sweet and didn't had a troublesome DA, but he might be one in a million mostly since he is from SA lines.
     
  14. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

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    I never had a dobe with DA & I have fostered two & raised one. Like I said ... Plenty of time to make a decision
     
  15. Sapphire-Light

    Sapphire-Light woof!

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    Maybe is because the majority of the ones I have met are from SA lines, here they are more common to see than the US ones since I'm in latin america.

    For what I have read they have mush stronger temperament to deal than the average US line dobe.

    Maybe you should go also to dog events like conformation shows, even if you don't plan in buying a show prospect you can see how the handlers deal and keep them while they aren't in the ring, how they react to other dogs, etc.
     
  16. crazedACD

    crazedACD Active Member

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    Don't forget you also have a male and a female ACD, which (as you certainly know) can be SSA and/or have inter-household fighting issues. I fight this out in my head when looking into breeds as adding another A-type personality (with tendencies towards SSA) might not be a great idea. Romeo isn't outwardly aggressive at all, not concerning, but with the other boys he can be scrappy in the house. He will be seven in June and it's really been the last two or three years (since hitting definite maturity) that this has started. Only the past year or so that he MUST be separated from one particular dog, and they lived together since he was a year old.

    As much as I would absolutely add another ACD as nextdog, when I'm ready I would have to assess my current situation, be realistic, and add the 'right' dog. I might decide on something like a Collie or a Poodle where the dog dynamic would be a little more relaxed.
     
  17. Pops2

    Pops2 New Member

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    Can't speak for the whole breed, but the dobe I had in high school had a deep & abiding hatred for all fuzzy dogs. Schnauzers, dales, drathaars you name it, if it was fuzzy she had a burning desire to kill it. Smooth dogs & long hair but not fuzzy (like setters), no problems.
     
  18. JennSLK

    JennSLK F150 and a .30-06

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    Im saying this as a Doberman person and (future) breeder who has spent time with both Dogos and Corsi:

    Both breeds make most Dobermans look mild mannered and people friendly . They are no were near the same for experience and personality needed for them.

    ANY emotion will come down the lead with these dogs. If you feel anxious in a crowd or nervous, the corso/dogo will too. They can and will bite someone.

    As for dog aggression in dobermans, the SA lines are more know for it. However a male doberman is about 95% likely to be SSA, MUCH more than a female. No good breeder would sell a male to a home with a male already in it, neutered or not, unless you had years of breed specific experience.

    Even though Danes are considered a mastiff type dog, I dont consider them to be temperament wise. They are so easy compared to a Corso or Dogo.

    I agree that there is nothing wrong with admitting a breed isnt suited for you. There are lots of breeds I want but wouldnt be a good owner for. ;)
     
  19. Paige

    Paige Let it be

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    This was a very informative read. Maybe got a little off topic for the original OP there for awhile but for someone who is doing research on Corsos right now THANK-YOU for your blunt honesty.
     
  20. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    I have like... less than zero interest in ever owning a guardian breed/molosser but I was wondering. I always thought corsos were not as intense as the presas, filas, etc. Is that the wrong assumption?
     

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