doggy fit

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by Alyusha, Jun 6, 2004.

  1. Alyusha

    Alyusha New Member

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    3 dogs Alyusha (5weeks, rottweiler) Molly (11years
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    When alyusha is 'playing' or more of less doign somehtign he is not to be doing. and i stop him, he throws a fit, it appears that he is snarling and showign his teeth. he will ty to bite...


    now he is a rottweiler and will get real big and if he continues this he will adventually rip my arm off... what i have been doing is holding his muzzel shut untill he stops spazign and then put him in his cage..


    Can you guys recomed anything?
     
  2. Alyusha

    Alyusha New Member

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    He does obey commands. Very well. As for crate training. No i am not. He sleeps with me and all. The crate is when he is bad so that if he does this enough he will be sererated.
     
  3. Alyusha

    Alyusha New Member

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    but i will look at the NILIF
     
  4. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    One thing I always do with my dogs at a very early stage is get them used to giving me their belly. When they start to be the canine equivalent of teenagers and want to test their independence a bit, I make them roll over and give me the belly when they disobey. I use this to establish the fact that I am the alpha of the pack, and with these dogs, it's crucial.

    Neutering also helps curb an overly aggressive male dog.
     
  5. Alyusha

    Alyusha New Member

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    i dont meen to be hostile in any way. But I have raised puppies and i have always used the crate as i do now. It has always worked for me. I did not know there was a correct way to use a dog cage.

    As a dog lover i have never come across a puppy that does not like to chew. As for the throwing fits, i know this needs to be corrected and this is the reeson why i have begun this page. It was not so i could be critisized on the way i train my dog.

    As for his commands he understands them perfectley at the age of 9 weeks. He does listen. This is not a problem. I just ask for sussgestions on what to do with his fits.
     
  6. Alyusha

    Alyusha New Member

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    i SAID HE IS PERFECTLEY OBEDIATN AS A 9 WEEK OLD ROTTWEILER WILL BE.


    I am done here she seems to change my words all around, and tell me what i have done for years is wrong, what i have done for years will not work? why did it work all the other times? why did all my other ROTTWEILER turn out fine and good dogs, if im going about this all wrong?
     
  7. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Okay, I'm going to interject here.

    I can't speak to crate training. I've never used it and don't anticipate using it. I'm a bit claustrophobic myself, and, perhaps erroneously, don't really like the idea of confining a large dog in a small space - seems a bit like prison, and nothing comes out of prison "kinder and gentler."

    That said, anyone I've ever listened to regarding crate training has been adamant that the crate not be used as punishment.

    I think, from your descriptions of Alyusha, that you've gotten the Rottie puppy that experienced Rottie owners dream about. He's intelligent and determined and very, very confident. You've probably really hit the jackpot with this one. That, along with getting him so young, is also why you're having this new problem.

    The fact that he is very receptive to obedience commands at this age is very good and it tells me that he wants to be a good dog. But he's also challenging you for leadership, and you just cannot let him win this one. You can't win by locking him up. You've got to teach him that you are alpha, but it's got to be in a way a dog understands. When you send him to his cage for punishment, he's going to be in there brooding to himself and it's not going to lead him to acknowledge you as alpha, he's just going to keep trying to take what he considers to be his "rightful" place. Think about the behaviours dogs use to establish dominance and show submission. When you want him to give up his belly in submission, put your hands on his shoulders and gently, but firmly, make him lie down and roll him over. Make him lay that way for a few seconds; hold him down gently with your hand on his chest, then accept the behaviour by rubbing his belly and telling him he's your good dog and make him feel very, very loved.

    I really do know what I'm talking about on this one. The dogs I deal with are not only extremely large, they have been bred for centuries to think independently, have no innate submissiveness to humans and to use their own judgement about situations, without having to wait for commands. They are capable of hunting and killing wild boar and the jaguar, as was necessary on the fazendas in Brazil to protect the herds of cattle. Establishing leadership in a way that does not involve physical confrontation is imperative - as it is with a puppy like your Alyusha.

    Personally, on this one, I'd just put the cage in the garage and forget about it. The best thing for Alyusha is going to be as much contact with you as possible. And keep up the wonderful work with the obedience exercises. Later on, you and Alyusha might even want to learn an activity, like carting, which is one of the tasks that the Rottweiller originally excelled at many, many generations past.

    You're really going to have to approach Alyusha differently; he sounds like he's going to be that extra-special Rottie who's supremely confident - even for a Rottweiller!

    Let us know how things progress, please.
     
  8. chazhound

    chazhound Alpha Dog Staff Member

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    Hi Alyusha,
    The intention of the suggestions is to give you other ideas and ways to work with your breed. Nobody has all the answers but you sure have some very knowledgeable and experienced peeps trying to help you. Please don't take the suggestions personally. We are truly just concerned when we hear about a biting/growling rottie pup.

    I have raised dogs for over 30 years, big ones, little ones, ect. And I still learn more about them each and everyday. If your rottie pup is biting and growling there is something wrong...

    Chazhound
     
  9. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    By the way, socializing Alyusha is going to be even more important than it usually is. Take him for walks where he will be exposed to people and other dogs, especially now while he is young.
     

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