Does the puppy class matter if you want to do competition?

Discussion in 'Dogs - General Dog Chat' started by Bigpoodleperson, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. Bigpoodleperson

    Bigpoodleperson Megan and Draco

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    I will be putting "New Guy" in puppy class. I want to eventually do cometition obedience with him. Do I have to start him out in more that "style" class? Does it matter how I teach him the basic commands now? A puppy class I really like does more manners style training, but tons of socialization. Otherwise there are puppy classes from the club that is heavy into competition. Does it matter?
     
  2. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    Personally, I'd look for the class that focuses more on socialization and manners. Kind of like a foundations agility class where you don't do the obsticles, a puppy obedience class should focus on other things besides competetion style obedience. JMO.
     
  3. SaraB

    SaraB New Member

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    This. The puppy has to learn to be a good dog with good manners before he can be an obedience competitor. I would however mention to the instructor that you are planning on doing competition obedience and ask if they have any additional exercises for you to do.
     
  4. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    My plan for the far future puppy will be the puppy/family dog class at the obedience place I go to, then starting agility foundations. I've taken both with Mia already. Both classes essentially focus on getting the dog understanding clicker training and things that will be helpful in the long run. We do crate game, puppy zen, food zen, focus games, free shaping, etc.

    I wouldn't put a competition dog in a typical petsmart puppy class or the class Beau was in as a youngster which involved a lot of traditional methods. I really think that has set me back with him now.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2012
  5. BostonBanker

    BostonBanker Active Member

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    Gusto went through one round of Good Manners when I first got him. It was all stuff that fed nicely into both a pet dog and a competition dog - basic self control stuff (Puppy Zen, 300 peck method of teaching a stay, restrained recalls). While I don't think it was incredibly necessary for us (all stuff I can train at home), it certainly didn't hurt anything, and it forced me to work on him so I didn't look like an idiot in class ;) We moved into a Performance Puppy class that is specifically geared towards competition puppies, and has been spectacular.

    Every class I've ever been to has been pretty willing to let people use the commands they are comfortable with, and been pretty flexible with most things. If you know about training for competitive obedience (I have no idea, but I'm assuming the cues you use and such are important), just handle your dog the way you want them to learn without being disruptive to the class. I bet the instructor will be fine with it.
     
  6. elegy

    elegy overdogged

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    Steve and I did pet-focused puppy and beginner classes. We were there primarily for socialization in puppy class and for attention work in beginner. The instructor knew I was looking to build a competition dog and that I knew what I wanted to work on, so she mostly left us to our own devices when working individually.

    I plan to do pretty much the same thing with Futurepuppy.
     
  7. Linds

    Linds Twin 2

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    I echo most everyone else. I did just a normal puppy class for the enviorment and working in a club around other dogs (keeping his focus on me) and did most of the training my own way.

    Something to keep in mind though, I don't know what your club is like but the couple I've been to, was in and watched the competition focused classes/people tend to be super heavy into luring from the start and I tend to prefer shaping and capturing and teaching a puppy to think and use it's body first and foremost and then worry about OB later on. I prefer the puppy not become so lure focused and I saw a lot of puppies getting ready for OB trialling become like that.
     
  8. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    I think a regular puppy class is fine, just be sure you have some idea about how a dog should properly perform the obedience commands so that you are not reinforcing an improper sit. Like how they have to sit squarely...in a pet puppy class the instructor may not consider that important and have no issue with people training a dog to sit with it's hip rolled or something.
     
  9. Bigpoodleperson

    Bigpoodleperson Megan and Draco

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    Ok, thanks everyone! I have never trialed a dog in comp. obed., so I honestly dont know how to start them out. The puppy manners class actually has a puppy class every Saturday morning that is just continual, so you can come whenever/for how long you want. Im not really so worried about the socialization part, I have lots of plans for that. I think it would be a fun class though. Ill talk to some comp. obed. people I know for what to train in a sit and stuff. I want him to get used to and comfortable in a class setting though and pay attention to me.
    Good thought on the luring Linds. Ill keep that in mind.
     
  10. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    Doh, I read competition and my thought immediately went to agility instead of obedience.
     
  11. smeagle

    smeagle New Member

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    I wouldn't rush into teaching formal obedience, with my new pup I'll do lots of drive and focus building and focus on having fun in puppy hood, then down the track I will teach formal positions etc.

    I haven't found a Puppy class run how I would train my pup so I doubt I will do one.
     
  12. stafinois

    stafinois Professional Nerd

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    My dogs have two sets of commands. For basic manners they are trained in English and my expectations are not as formal. For competition, I expect more precision, and I train those exercises in French. It helps keep the two worlds separate, and I don't have to worry about my husband messing up commands and confusing them.
     

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