Do you consider your dog "breed worthy", hypothetically?

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by AdrianneIsabel, Feb 4, 2013.

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Do you consider your dog "breed worthy", hypothetically?

  1. Yes

    31 vote(s)
    36.0%
  2. No

    34 vote(s)
    39.5%
  3. Almost

    15 vote(s)
    17.4%
  4. This is a dog forum?

    6 vote(s)
    7.0%
  1. SpringerLover

    SpringerLover Active Member

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    Bailey-never in a million years. She has a few good things going for her, but structurally, she's a train-wreck. She has a myriad of health issues and some mental health problems as well. I love the dog to pieces but she should never recreate!

    Buzz-I've often fantasized about breeding him, if he didn't have allergies. He is built very well and he's pretty much the easiest dog to live with. I attribute a lot of his less than stellar behaviors to his lack of training/very poor training as a youngster. We were able to "fix" a lot of it but he just really doesn't give a cr@p about people vs environment unless there's food involved.

    Although, they both have all breed-specific health testing completed. So, I can breed them TOGETHER, right? :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2013
  2. DJEtzel

    DJEtzel New Member

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    Frag; Nope. He's got allergies, and some weird aggression issue in the past likely due to a combo of allergies and nerves. He's got great hips though! ;)

    Sir; Eh... He'd make cute puppies, that's for sure! But, he's got too much directed prey drive that isn't controllable. Could be fixed with time, but he's iffy with other dogs, too, so I wouldn't want to take the risk.

    Recon; If only he had another nut to use! :lol-sign: Lots of ups and downs with him as a puppy, but he's only 6 months old, so it's too soon to tell. He's got GREAT drive and instinct so far, but is a little guardy, too loud for my taste, and a little too soft. He's bomb proof in some areas and in others it's like.. "where did Mr. Confidence go!?".. that's a puppy for ya!
     
  3. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    Well, this isn't Lamarckism. Yorkies are born with tails. They just get them docked. That's like me saying Gavroche is out of standard because he has a tail.
     
  4. Zoom

    Zoom Twin 2.0

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    Sawyer has a couple of minor structural faults (front pasterns are a hair too long) but other than that and the fact that I have zero idea of his back ground...I would seriously consider it. Stellar temperament, good moderate coat, no health issues and even though he's nine, people mistake him for a four year old.

    Too bad he's neutered.
     
  5. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    Kaia yes. Passed her health tests, AKC pointed, has the most fabulous, most stable temperament EVER, and she killed her first coyote when she was only 7 months old. Killing a coyote is probably the closest any borzoi in the world could hope to get to proving they're still capable of performing their original purpose.

    Strider is more complicated. There are things about him that oh heck yes. But there's enough other little stuff that I didn't want to risk being passed on, so he's neutered. He doesn't generally like other males. He developed epilepsy after being poisoned and I don't know if the poisoning caused it or if he was already predisposed and it pushed him over the edge. And he has severe flea allergies. Other than that, he's amazing and sometimes I kick myself for neutering him.
     
  6. Taqroy

    Taqroy Active Member

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    Murphy - No. His temperament with humans and most dogs is freaking awesome (aside from his serial humping tendencies, which could probably be fixed with time and effort) and he's the easiest dog to live with ever. But structurally he's a bit of a freak show. And just because he's aged REALLY well doesn't mean I'd want to chance that on his offspring.

    Mu - Ehhhh. I think she'd be fantastic as a sport breed. She's drivey and focused and quick. She's reactive though (which I don't completely count as a negative) and she is rather intolerant of other dogs. I think the reactivity and intolerance would be so so much better if I'd known wtf I was doing when she was a puppy. She didn't get nearly enough socialization. I don't know enough about structure to say for sure, but her's doesn't look quite right to me - it's not bad, but it's not the best either. I also wonder if that would be better if I hadn't had her spayed so early.

    Tipper - Nah. I freaking love her structure (which again probably isn't perfect) and her temperament but I don't think she needs to be bred. She's fun and drivey but getting her to focus is hard and tbh it's kind of a pain in the ass. It's the main reason she is not as well trained as Mu. I don't know if she would be better if I'd gotten her as a puppy or if it's just something innate. But if I were a breeder it's definitely not something I'd want continuing.

    It's harder to say with Murphy and Tipper. Is Murphy's temperament awesome because it just is, or did someone do an amazing job socializing him as a puppy and his natural awesomeness got a boost? Is Tipper soft and easy to shut down because she is, or because her previous owners yelled at/whacked her for everything? And of course, because I don't know the answers to those questions I wouldn't be willing to hypothetically breed either of them. I can give a fair guess as to where Mu's messed up tendencies come from (*looks at self*) lol.
     
  7. chaospony

    chaospony New Member

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    Nope.
    Not in a million years!
    They came from a puppy mill, from parents who should never have been bred in a million years themselves!

    Just a look at Trin's "grin" is a pretty good inductor. Mommy passed along her wonky bite to the young'uns. Every single pup out of her has snaggley teeth in some shape or form. Most just hide it better. But poor Trin's bottom jaw is about an inch and half past her upper one.
    Both parents also have major fear issues, as do many of the pups, but much of this is due to the conditions they were raised in, but certain Afghan lines can produce dogs that are more fearful than one would wish for.
    The father also has terrible conformation. He is a bit of a swayback mule! Robyn's wonky back become more prominent as she gets older.
    That being said, both parents are beyond adorable and very gentle. I love meeting up with them...I just wish they weren't so scared so I could give them a cuddle!
     
  8. MandyPug

    MandyPug Sport Model Pug

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    If I wanted pugs that win in the show ring? No.

    But if I want pugs that can play sports and be active little family dogs. Then yes, in a heartbeat.

    Her structure is actually nice, she's not overly straight like show pugs, is nice and flexible, and according to a lot of people is amazingly well built for our activities. The only problem is her height is awkward therefore bumping her to 16" thanks to a mere 1/4" over. We have specials though so meh.

    Her temperament is fantastic, she's pretty brave but is loving to pretty much all people unless they're threatening. She's a star therapy dog and awesome shop dog. She learns well and fairly quickly, would probably be even better if I had raised her right.

    So provided she passed her health testing and such I would breed her. To a specific dog though. Too bad they're both fixed and unregistered.
     
  9. yv0nne

    yv0nne Vizsla mom

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    If Penny didn't have white toes& chest, the breeder was going to keep her as her pick of the litter. Thank you, white markings <3 We got our perfect little defect V! We had last pick but pretty much everyone who took from this litter wanted a male and the people who wanted females wanted either show females or darker colored than Penny.

    So all this to say, I wouldn't but if she had no white she would have been tested, titled& knocked up ;)
     
  10. Julee

    Julee UNSTOPPABLE

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    This. I very much prefer Yorkies with tails :)
     
  11. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    Shamoo- I would say yes. She is ideal in size, a great structure, naturally well muscled, svelt, and has drive out the wazoo. She has a stable temperament and although training her is a often the equivalent of slamming your head into a wall it's likely due to her previous life.

    Arnold- Nope, he's structurally painful looking and while he's a very typical gamey pit bull he finds too much joy in fights and he's far too good at them for me to feel comfortable breeding. He's amazing with people though and has great food drive (I squashed his toy/prey drive but it hung in there minimally). He's also very leggy but he was neutered at 4 months by his previous owner so who knows what his structure would be like if left intact.

    (and here come clients... to be continued...)
     
  12. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    This is a really cool thread idea!

    I think, obviously, my answer is no. For both Milo, and Benji.

    If given the chance, I would have probably bred my American Eskimo growing up. Now, I wouldn't make that decision, as he was a pet store puppy...and although he did have a pedigree and we knew who his breeder and parents were, I'm not sure if they were ever health tested or titled (I do believe some of them were Ch. in confirmation, not sure though).

    But: he was structurally sound and to standard, moreso than many other eskimos I've seen. He had an awesome temperament and easily could have titled in agility or obedience with the right training, would have made an awesome therapy dog...he could have had his CGC but we never went for it...even if he never got titled in confirmation, he was really an above-and-beyond pet.

    He was also extremely healthy, and lived to 16 with no serious health problems at all (allergies, but I believe they were environmental, and fairly mild). If I could have found out who his parents were and gotten health test results on them, and they were good, I would without a doubt want to breed him.
     
  13. frostfell

    frostfell Kung Pow Fish

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    considering Im a breeder, my brood dogs had better be breedworthy :rofl1:

    Serious answer:
    my foundation bitch has her issues, she can be timid and anxious, and has some minor structural issues, but on the flipside shes got some traits that the breed needs, and that i wanted to... mmmm.... cultivate. shes absolutely rock solid with other animals, and other than her minor structural flaws, is tough as nail and has overall excellent health. never sick, never winded, great condition with little to no workout regime, etc.

    my newer bitch, her granddaughter, is perfect. seriously. i could just quit right now. friendly, unflappable, bombproof, loves everything and everyone, great structure, HAPPYHAPPY ALL THE TIME, smart, good focus and work ethic, low/moderate drive and energy. Im very pleased so far with what this "blood" has produced for me, and Ill be trying to find more of it if I can, to incorporate into my existing plans for the next 20-30 years

    my breed is really a hot mess right now, and im really lucky i got dogs as good as i have. i see famous sires with 1200+ offspring and they bite visitors and produce bad hearts, etc.... so sad. so discouraging
     
  14. StillandSilent

    StillandSilent New Member

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    Is there a single person on Chaz who would honestly take a Gambit pup? Becuse you may need professional help. ;)

    Gambit's health is fantastic. Gorgeous form, strong as an ox, all but takes flight when he jumps, turns on a dime, I can not say enough good things about him physically. He is my dream agility dog.

    He's smart as a whip, can open doors, always willling to try new things, trains easily, is all but perfect as a pet.

    But he has his fear issues. Not minor ones, more like 'I need medication to make it through the day' issues. Some of them are probably the result of an enormously deprived puppyhood. Some are the results of a feral mother. Some are the results of a romeo-type coyote seducing said mother with promises of beach houses and everlasting love.

    So, no. There is no way Gambit should breed. And, due to lack of having his gumdrops, no chance of it happening either.
     
  15. Airn

    Airn New Member

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    I really don't know enough about the breed to say yes or no. And there is a chance she could be a mix. (I'm still going with Kelpie, though, since that's the obvious breed.)

    I don't think the white splashings are ideal in the breed, so coat wise she would probably not be bred.
    She has some SA issues... possible DA issues. We haven't had her long enough to know. And she's not old enough for me to make a decision like that. She'll be 2 years the end of April.
    If she was with someone who knew what they were doing, I think she would be an amazing dog. I'm doing what I can, but obviously I'm new to the dog world and I'm sure we're lagging behind.

    She is a huge cuddlebug, verrrrry easy to train. Loves food, attention and toys. She loves me and is eager to 'prove' herself. (She already can go through tunnels and jump over whatever I ask her to. To me, that's a big deal :rofl1:)

    Overall, I would have to say no. I don't know her history, parents, what her life as a pup was like... and the few issues she has I'm not sure if they were brought on by her past or if she was prone to them. Ask me in a couple of years and I might have a completely different answer. (I'm hoping a Chazzer will eventually meet her and tell me what they think. :rolleyes:)
     
  16. misfitz

    misfitz Ruddy Buttinski

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    I'll say yes because aside from being adorable :) Sienna is the most bombproof dog I've ever met. Nothing fazes her - aggressive dogs and pushy kids she just walks away from. I don't know what you'd have to do to incite her to bite - I'm not sure it's possible...she had an incident with a baby gate once that (long story short) involved her hanging upside down from the gate by her hind toes, having the gate cut with wire cutters while she was hanging, and this by two strange men (my landlord at the time and his friend.) Not a peep from her, and she was grateful to them after it was over.

    So yeah, awesome temperment! And she's athletic, well-structured from what I know anyway, and healthy...she's almost 6 and has no health problems yet. She's the perfect pet dog IMO, with enough energy to play obedience with me and go hiking, but calm indoors and doesn't need a ton of exercise to stay sane.
     
  17. Sekah

    Sekah The Monster.

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    I would say no for Cohen, though from time to time I sometimes vaguely lament that she's spayed.

    Her faults are many. She's not a "typey" Aussie at all. She's small (36-37 lbs when in good condition and 21") but oddly long in body. She's a bit butt high too and her croup is really long. Her stop is pretty steep for the breed too. Her parents weren't anything special - her dam was a pet and her sire was a BISS Ch without any impressive performance titles. Her temperament, while mostly good, has a bit of a mean streak which I would not want to see passed on to another generation.

    Her redeeming qualities are awesome though. Her handler focus is marvelous. She's highly adaptable and trainable and is showing herself adept in a variety of venues. Her self control is lovely while working. I like her small size and her slim build. Her structure seems, to my laymen's eye, quite nice aside from the issues mentioned above. She's drivey, but not too sharp. She recovers from stress quickly. Plus, she's quite a pretty dog.

    Mega is intact. Though, I don't much like small dogs so, no, I have no plans to breed her. She's a typical small dog in that she's barky, uncomfortable around strangers and has a low tolerance for stress and pain. Some of that may be her upbringing, I don't know. Her angulation makes me weep it's so straight. She's a puppy milled dog, so... However, compared to other small dogs she has a nice edge to her. She tugs and has decent play drive and wonderful food drive. She listens well and is very much a set it and forget it type of dog who I think would be very appreciated by small dog people. Most people who meet her become enamored with her pretty quickly and I bet that if bred, I could find some nice sport homes for the pups.
     
  18. Equinox

    Equinox Active Member

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    Absolutely yes for Trent, based on what I do know about him. Obviously if I were to actually pursue breeding him, I'd train him IPO first, not so much for the title as it would be for the knowledge. I don't know if he'd bring any active aggression, I don't know how well he would engage a threat, or how his grips will be, and I'd like to know that and more before breeding him as a German Shepherd.

    But what I do know is that he is a very good middle of the road dog. He is well balanced and moderately driven. Thresholds are just low enough to make training in prey easy, and high enough for him to remain unflappable in most situations. Exceptions are cats outside triggering his prey drive, and strangers catching us by surprise and scaring me at night (if we are turning a corner or if a couple of kids are messing with me). But even then he does not lose his head and I can regain his attention. He is a handler oriented dog and eager to please, but neither soft nor altogether hard. He will try anything I ask of him, though he holds on to his self preservation instincts.

    He does have issues with dog reactivity, but it's residual behavior from an earlier phase (and bad/lack of training on my part). He's not dog park material, but he will be able to live with others without conflict, and is starting to get the idea of leaving other dogs alone completely. Once he gets past his initial interest, he is okay.

    Pedigree-wise he is a great candidate, especially now as breeders are trying to avoid some of the more prolific dogs in the lines. And while he is free of many of the big names, every dog within his 5 generation pedigree and beyond (didn't look past 5 gens) has been titled in SCHH/IPO and health tested. His structure is also adequate and reasonably to standard. Not great, but not a train wreck, and distinguishable as a German Shepherd's build. He could probably go G or SG at an SV show or finish as a UKC CH in the UKC show ring.

    Of course, while he's still intact, I definitely won't be breeding him. Maybe if the breed was suddenly becoming extinct, sure. But he's mediocre at best and there are thousands of better GSDs available, titled, and health tested.
     
  19. Cali Mae

    Cali Mae Little dog, big voice

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    Cali: I wouldn't breed her even if she wasn't spayed, but there's things about her that do make her "breed worthy". If her ears were either straight up or completely down like a Phalene, she'd likely do good in conformation shows. She also has luxating patellas so that'd be a huge no to breeding, Chaz has transformed me into some sort of dog nut! :p I'd never even think of breeding a dog without health testing and various titles pertaining to the particular breed.

    1) Her general appearance is the standard excluding the ears, although her ears are very expressive and fringed: "The Papillon is a small, friendly, elegant toy dog of fine-boned structure; light, dainty and of lively action; distinguished from other breeds by its beautiful butterfly-like ears." (taken from CKC website)

    2) Her face markings are ideal, although one side of the white on her muzzle goes a tiny bit farther back

    3) Her facial structure is very to standard if you look at her front-on and particularly from the side and her ears are set at the 45 degree angle as well.

    4) She has well-angled hind legs, her toes are straight, her feet are "hare-like" as well.

    5) Her gait is very quick and easy, she's a little speed walker and has pretty good reach

    6) Her personality is great: insanely friendly, eager to learn, very smart, loyal, affectionate, and she has some drive for a toy dog.

    7) She has an awesome pedigree, with numerous well-known Papillons.
     
  20. Sit Stay

    Sit Stay Not a Border Collie

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    I am undecided on Quinn. She has many great things about her - she is a beautiful dog with good structure. She is effortlessly athletic and can go all day. She has great toy and food drive, with awesome agility potential. She has a ton of herding drive and our trainer has no doubt we can get her titled and moving up the levels. She isn't all show though - she is a wonderful farm dog at home and very versatile. Aware of her handler but with enough independence to make her own decisions if needed. Intelligent and thoughtful. Family oriented. Loves people. Rock solid nerves and 100% trustworthy with any child or small animal. Has demonstrated some good protective instinct and also the ability to turn it off and be content with the person as soon as I say they're okay. High drive with lots of desire with an amazing natural off switch. Very easy to live with. Registered both ESC and UKC from health tested parents, with close relatives doing tracking, agility, obedience and flyball.

    Certain things make me hesitate. She does have seasonal allergy problems. Her DR I wouldn't necessarily count against her as I am quite certain that she would be fine if I had handled her better. Certain structural things. I wish she had more coat. She still needs her hips and elbows done and I would like to title her.

    If ever bred I would seek out a male who is a bit more easy going with more balanced drive. Quinn can be a little intense at times and most ES people would probably prefer a dog that's softer on sheep. Some days I do lol. Ideally, if bred to something easier going while still maintaining proper drive and structure, we would get more of a range in drive and aptitude.

    All very hypothetical! I am very content buying, not breeding :)
     

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