Digest-eeze rawhide and dental chews

Discussion in 'Dog Food and Recipes' started by Maxy24, Aug 21, 2013.

  1. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    I have two similar questions so I figured I'd just make one thread for them.

    Has anyone heard of digest-eeze rawhide? It's supposed to be treated with some sort of enzymes that make it break down easier in the stomach. We gave our previous dog rawhide all the time but I don't give it to Tucker because everyone warns about blockages. I've always wished he could have some though since it's cheaper than bully sticks so he could get it more often. At work I saw fliers for the digest-eeze rawhide and was wondering if anyone knew anything about it, mainly is it really safe?


    My second question is, do any of those dental chews really work, are they any better than chewing a bully stick? You know, like greenies, nutrident, etc. The ingredients are sort of concerning though so I don't know how I feel about that. I brush Tucker's teeth but when I am at school my parents do not so I want another way to keep his teeth clean.
     
  2. stardogs

    stardogs Behavior Nerd

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    They get hides from Central America. I wouldn't feel comfortable feeding a product that isn't sourced and made in the US given what I've heard about the processing chemicals used in other countries.

    If I give rawhides, I give Wholesome Hide - great quality, long lasting, AND US sourced and made.
     
  3. Southpaw

    Southpaw orange iguanas.

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    This.

    And, generally what I tell people about rawhides is that you kind of need to know your dog's chewing style. I wouldn't give them to Juno because she likes to swallow things whole. She can swallow a 6" bully stick with no ill effects but I'm not so sure about rawhides. If she took the time to actually CHEW though I don't think I'd be so concerned.

    Dental chews I don't have a lot of faith in, they're better than nothing but they're pretty pricey and you have to give like 1 or 2 a day. Would your parents use a dental spray?
     
  4. Roger Biduk

    Roger Biduk New Member

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    Why even trust some kind of "dental chew" when the absolute best for a dog's teeth and gums is simply a raw or very lightly cooked meaty bone.
    Roger Biduk
     
  5. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    I'm always concerned about the frequency of giving raw bones though, and about knowing what type to give. We've given marrow bones but they concern me a bit because he tries really hard to eat them and I am afraid he'll break a tooth. He's too small for many of the edible bones people give their dogs, I don't know what to give him that's big enough to be safe but small enough to be edible so he won't break his teeth. I'm afraid giving him any raw bones frequently will give him diarrhea. Chews just seem easier, certainly less messy, and don't require as much supervision. But I'll stick to bully sticks and Himalayan chews, I'm sure they do something.
     
  6. Roger Biduk

    Roger Biduk New Member

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    Those chews don't do anything and the ingredients are waste products at best, even if they're made in North America.
    Absolutely nothing beats a good meaty rib bone for their teeth, gums and overall health... it's cheap and you know what your getting.
    I wouldn't let my cats, my Siberian or any clients' pets near one of those chews.
    Roger Biduk
     
  7. ruffiangirl

    ruffiangirl New Member

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    My dogs love Himalayan dog chews. They only get raw bones outside I have no where in my 700sqft place to give Gage raw bones all the time, he can only really have them outside, and with 5+ months of winter he can have them for that time. Summer or winter his teeth don't look any better with one or the other to be honest.
     
  8. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    I don't see why a bone would work and a bully stick or Himalayan chew wouldn't. It all comes down to having to gnaw on something hard so that it scrapes against the teeth. He gnaws on Himalayan chews and bully sticks a lot harder and longer than edible bones. If I were feeding a raw diet then I surely would expect cleaner teeth as they have to chew like that every single meal. But when just talking about the occasional bone given a couple of times a week, I don't think it would trump either of those chews. Maybe a non-edible bone would, but as I said broken teeth are a concern of mine with those.
     
  9. ruffiangirl

    ruffiangirl New Member

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    In the summer Gage gets beef rib bones and turkey necks. But he's big lol. The littles get chicken wings and necks. They all seem to love necks the most, well except diesel who will happily walk away from his neck, letting the other dogs have it to chew on a Himalayan instead lol. [​IMG] but his teeth seem just fine with them.
     
  10. Panzerotti

    Panzerotti New Member

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    Interesting! I have been looking at the Himalayan chews lately, wondering if dogs even like them and how long they last. They aren't a big seller at my store, so I wasn't sure if I should try them out. But, if they are Gage approved, then I'll have to get Pan one. :)
     
  11. ruffiangirl

    ruffiangirl New Member

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    I really think the price is huge deterrent, I pay $35-40 for two large ones. They don't last nearly as long as antlers, but I don't think it would be possible to break teeth on them, and they have no odour, which was a huge concern when I first got them, I mean they are made from milk, they should smell, but the don't.

    But yep they are one of the few things eve Bristol will chew on.
     
  12. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    I stopped buying them because of the price at the store we buy dog food at. When I started working at Petsmart I saw they had them and they are WAY cheaper than at the smaller independent stores. A large was like $10-12. For Tucker it lasts 2-3 weeks, so it's a good investment.
     
  13. Roger Biduk

    Roger Biduk New Member

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    It's meat that cleans a cat/dog's teeth and gums

    Raw or very lightly cooked meaty bones is what does the trick with the meat (and bone) scraping against the teeth and gums, removing plaque before it gets a chance to mature into a bacterial mix... any of the commercial chews or bones definitely shouldn't be trusted.

    My Siberian had terrible brown teeth and gums bordering on periodontal disease when I found him; now both his teeth and gums are in excellent shape and radiate color.

    Dr. Tom Lonsdale wrote two excellent books "Raw Meaty Bones Promotes Health" and "Work Wonders: Feed Your Dog Raw Meaty Bones"
    Roger Biduk
     

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