Corgis?

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by TexasRanger, Jan 30, 2014.

  1. TexasRanger

    TexasRanger New Member

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    I have slowly fallen in love with them (both types) (long distance since I've never seen one in person:rolleyes:) and would love to own one someday. What can you tell me about them?

    How are they with cats?
    Is DA/SSA a big problem?
    How do they do with strange people/dogs?
    Trainability?
    What are the major health issues?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Elrohwen

    Elrohwen New Member

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    My mother-in-law has one and she's a sweet and very funny dog. She's older and not awesome with other dogs, but not aggressive either. Just undersocialized I guess. She has bitten people a few times and has poor bite inhibition, but they got her from a pet store at 5 months so it's not surprising that she would has some issues.

    Last year she had back problems - a slipped disc I think, but involved expensive surgery and physical therapy. Again, she's from a pet store so I don't know how common back issues really are with well bred dogs.

    Overall I think they're really neat little dogs. I love cardis though I've only met a few at dog shows.
     
  3. FG167

    FG167 New Member

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    They are awesome. I love them. I have a Cardigan Corgi and also lived with her half-sister for 2 years.

    They're loud, and definitely herding dogs. Both girls like to use their voices, a lot. Not any more or less than my other herders, but they are loud.

    Both the girls were FANTASTIC with the cats. Neither had been raised with cats, both were introduced to two itty kittens as adult dogs - no issues at all.

    I have no experience with either of our girls having DA/SSA. Before I got Eden, the breeder was speaking to me about her brother but the breeder thought the dog might be a little snarky with my other male so we decided I should get the female (Eden) instead. Both the girls are very strong tempered dogs, but they have had a TON of dogs moving through (board and trains, work dogs, foster dogs, puppies, adults etc etc) and they have NEVER EVER had a problem with any of them. They are also fantastic at all sporting events they have been to. The two of them get along PERFECTLY and they were not raised as puppies together or anything.

    Eden's temperament is totally outside of standard (that's why I got her), she's outrageously social, friendly, silly, go up to anyone and meet them etc. Poppy is more correct. She's more aloof, and she doesn't beg strangers to pet her - BUT she's totally social and safe. We have never had a problem with either of them meeting new people, of all ages. In fact, at one IPO trial, we handed the girls off to a gaggle of little girls (aged 8-13) and they played with them the entire day. We could see them the whole time of course, and the girls were raised with GSDs so they were wonderful with the Corgis but I don't know too many dogs that would've not only felt comfortable with that, but greatly enjoyed it like the Cardis did.

    They're both very bright. Easy to train. Biddable. The food drive is out of this world. The toy drive is not so accessible in terms of using it to train with. They both like toys, like to tug, like to chase and chew, but neither like it enough to actually work FOR a toy. Food though, food can get them to do almost anything.

    I can't really take credit for their upbringing at all. And next Corgi I add I will definitely going back to the same breeder. He absolutely was honest with what we were getting and he did a phenomenal job raising both the girls. They travel well, are easy to handle and manage, and are just all around awesome dogs!

    Some photos....
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    This is Eden's playlist...so you can see how "trainable" she is. She's got titles in multiple venues.

    http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL17CBA52422E56ADD
     
  4. Sekah

    Sekah The Monster.

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    I think that I know more corgis with serious health problems than without. To me they strike me as a cute but problem-ridden breed.
     
  5. PWCorgi

    PWCorgi Priscilla Winifred Corgi

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    They can be the snarkyest little sh!tfaces, so be prepared for that.

    I obviously have one, I won't have one again, and I'm not really a fan of the breed(s) in general.

    Frodo is a nice big bundle of mental and physical health issues. He has anxiety, both generalized and separation based, he doesn't like strange dogs and is iffy with strange people. He also has hip dysplasia, carpal issues, and potential IVDD/bulging disk. And half of his lines are actually good breeding!

    So after Frodo I thought maybe it was just Frodo that I didn't mesh well with, but the more of them that I meet, the more I realize that I really just don't care for them.

    Obviously other people love them. I didn't do my homework as a 16 year old before I got mine. I just say meet a lot of them before you bring one home.
     
  6. xpaeanx

    xpaeanx Active Member

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    I have a pem, Muffin. I seriously love him to pieces. I want 900 million corgis!

    That being said, I do recommend meeting(preferably babysitting!!) them before getting one. They definitely do things on their own terms and they're def full of snark. Muffin is ok with other dogs 1 one 1, but he most certainly is NOT a dog park dog. With people it depends, sometimes he's aloof and sometimes he wants pets.

    He doesn't have any real DA but he'll snap quickly if another dog annoys him. He doesn't have any SA with me, my friend claim he whines in his crate(downstairs) at night at their house... His crate at home is in my room and he doesn't make a peep. On vacation he was in the cabin's living room and nothing... So idk.

    He likes to use his big boy voice... A lot, he also rooos all the time. He's not a yappey non-stop barker, he's an excited barker/roo-er.

    If you do get one, make sure you go through a reputable breeder... Especially with pems. So many BYBs are breeding them with terrible health and temperaments just bc their little legs make them cute and the "queen has them."
     
  7. Elrohwen

    Elrohwen New Member

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    I wanted to add that my MIL's dog does the "roo" thing all the time. She does it on cue to "sing" and it's the cutest thing. She's not barky, but she's very talkative (which I much prefer to barky).

    I also thought of something related to DA/SSA. MIL's pembroke lived with a female brittany for years without issues, so no SSA there.

    Once at a show Watson wrestled with a cardi boy before they went into their separate group rings. :rofl1: Watson was 10 months old and I was only going into the group ring out of obligation, so I didn't care if he got his grooming all messed up by romping with another dog. I'm surprised the other owner was ok with it, but he seemed like a really nice guy. That dog definitely didn't have any DA or SSA at all and was quite friendly. I understand that's not totally typical though.
     
  8. Bugsgirl

    Bugsgirl New Member

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    I have 4 pems now. All rescues two are half brothers. I had there mom as well but adopted after I got the brothers. So 6 total 3 adult (senior rescues). I love them with all my heart I only have herding breeds but they can be serious dogs.
    I have a had malinios and dutch shepherds as well as cattle dogs and all my corgi have been just as much dog in a shorter body. They can be so sweet, cuddle and loyal but they can be so snarky with other dogs too. And if a fight breaks out they are all in it (even my 13 yr. old female) and will fight-fight. They often weren't even involved in the incident that start it but they soon jump in and start grabbing and ripping and they go crazy bus nutz. My other dogs run for the hills. Yes, my high drive herding dogs run from my crazy corgis when they fight. As much as I love the breed, I am not sure I'd own any again. Health and temperament issues abound (all my dogs have ortho issue through the roof). Oh, we have two cats the dogs totally ignore them and 2 pet rats all my corgis love and protect from the other dogs. They are a whole lot of dog in a lil package. My corgi can be around other dogs just find but if someone brings it on they do not back down. Not to unusual for my to be pulling my smallest (24 lbs.) neutered boy corgi off some huge dog who crossed some imaginary line during a class or in the day care I supervise. Most herding dogs have bubbles they live in at least in there minds but corgi bubble are very big. When we have dogs come to board here it is not uncommon for my corgis to say you see all this, this is mine, that corner over there you can use but it's still mine. Until mean mom says they have to share which they do but only because I make them.
     
  9. TexasRanger

    TexasRanger New Member

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    They sound nice on paper and TV (Dogs 101), but I don't think they'll be a good fit for me (already have one dog that will fight at the drop of a hat, don't need another).

    Do both types have the same health issues?
     
  10. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

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    Agreed. I have seen a good many with allergies and other issues like disc problems and bad patellas. The ones I have met are very cute and their temperaments are great, but, like rotties, their health problems scare me away.
     
  11. xpaeanx

    xpaeanx Active Member

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    You might want to look more toward cardigans then and really get to know lines. I haven't personally met any outside of dog shows, but talking to owners they are the more even-tempered of the two.

    This is a good article about the health problems in the breed.
     
  12. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    The cardis I know are all pretty healthy from what I've seen. The old girl is still running agility too. I'd take a cardi but I don't tend to like pemmies too much.
     
  13. xpaeanx

    xpaeanx Active Member

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    ^^Cardis also don't have the same amount of BYB/milling going on. It's growing for that breed but not like with pems. Also, pems have a sharper personality so I think that got exacerbated by the poor breeding, and dwarf dogs have extra problems that will just go horrible quickly with poor breeding.


    /sigh.
     
  14. Emily

    Emily Rollin' with my bitches

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    I have a Cardi, I suppose she's on the sharper side for the breed but I still find her very easy to live with.

    Riddled with health problems? I dunno, not Cardis. It would help if people clarified which breed they were actually talking about before making sweeping statements like that about "corgis." It's prudent to remember that they are two separate breeds.

    My dog's great granddam died at 18; her granddam is still very active at 12 and her mother is still acting like a young dog at 8. Mine has flea allergies but other than that, nothing. She's super hardy and has an iron stomach. She's actually never seen a vet for anything but vaccines and she'll be 3 in May. *shrug* I don't do breeds with generally poor health but I would own another Cardi in a heartbeat, so...

    As far as temperament goes, you love them or hate them. They believe the world belongs to them and good luck to you if you try to up end that belief. Mine is a fast learner and a great thinker, and also loves fun and games. They absolutely do not do well with force in training or being drilled, but are otherwise easy to train IME.

    Mine is fairly aloof with strangers but I never worried about her being handled or touched. She's guardy of perimeters and will do bluff charges at people who let themselves in to the house, yard, or car. But, really fine with people out in public. We went to a big outdoor dog show last summer where she got passed around and made a lot of friends, and even worked the the vendors over for treats and pets. ;)

    Dogs are touchier but she is not dangerous - again, it's a loud, bossy bluff charge. She used to be quite DR but has basically overcome that with training and maturity. That was partially genetic but also escalated seriously after she was attacked by a Great Dane. Any prospective corgi owner should know that after being pryed out of a Great Dane's mouth and left with several punctures across her body, she actually started snarling and trying to get back to him. :rolleyes:

    She is bossy with household dogs but there is only so much of that I will allow, and she knows it. Left unchecked, she would be telling everyone what they can and cannot do. New dogs entering the home is another cup of tea but I've learn how to manage introductions and it's very doable to introduce dogs into the household.

    RG can be a problem in the breed, but mine only "RG's" to the very normal extent of not wanting others to steal her stuff. I do not allow excessive guarding displays or stealing from other dogs. She does not RG with people at all and I can take raw food from her without an issue.

    They do tend to be LOUD IMO. Mine is bark collar conditioned and that makes life in certain situations a lot easier. How other want to handle the barking is up to them, but so be aware they're quite loud.

    I dunno, mine is certainly not riddled with health or behavioral issues. Then again, sometimes I see things described as "behavioral issues" that are just corgis being corgis, so I suppose much is perspective and making sure the breed suits you. I need all my dogs to be the kind that can hop up, go anywhere and do anything, without a bunch of consideration into health or temperament issues, and my Cardi certainly fits that bill. We took her hiking in one of the few canyons we have in Illinois last autumn and she kept up with the long legged dogs like it was nothing, scrabbled over rocks and logs, etc.

    Mine is health, hardy, sane, and sound little dog with a big personality.
     
  15. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    What's your method? That's my main concern iwth Nextdog. I know Mia will be interesting and it will need to be done well.
     
  16. Emily

    Emily Rollin' with my bitches

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    Verbal corrections, body blocking/spatial pressure (getting between her and other dog and pushing into her space until she yields to me), and rewards/reassurance for appropriate behavior. And a lot (a LOT) setting her up for success, putting her in good situations with the new dog, helping both of them find appropriate ways to interact. I don't mean to make it sound like it's 90% punishment because it's not; I try really hard to make sure they're put in good situations and the new dog isn't allowed to push her buttons, and make a point encouraging positive interactions. But if she crosses the line I have no problem letting her know her behavior is not acceptable.
     
  17. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

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    We have an almost 10 year old Cardi and I'd say Emily's description is spot on. The only thing he's been to the vet for in his life beyond routine stuff is to have a broken tooth removed. Oh and he got antibiotics for Lyme when our dogs all got covered in deer ticks after a hike. Otherwise, he's a healthy, rugged, able bodied and relatively easy to live with dog. He is loud and bossy with the other dogs but not really anything major.

    There's quite a few Cardis at the local training club and they all pretty much fit Emily's description too. Out of probably the 20+ that I have known and seen regularly, only one has had back issues and the rest have all been extremely healthy and lived to be very old dogs (15-18 years). I'm just not seeing all the unhealthy, unstable corgis. They are herders and as herders, they come with a tendency towards quirky behavior, bossiness, being snarky with other dogs and not forgiving of harsh treatment but those are hardly traits limited to herders. I've been around fewer Pems but we fostered one and he was similar to Ziggy but more a happy type dog and outgoing with strangers. Ziggy is more intense in general and he's pretty aloof with strangers.
     
  18. FransterDoo

    FransterDoo New Member

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    What is the difference between the 2 kinds (types? breeds?) of Corgis?
     
  19. TexasRanger

    TexasRanger New Member

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    Thank you for creating a new addiction. :D I sooo want one, but I cant seem to find any in my area. Would you happen to know any breeders in TX?
     
  20. FG167

    FG167 New Member

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