breeding a dog with a hernia

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by dogsarebetter, Oct 14, 2008.

  1. dogsarebetter

    dogsarebetter EVIL SHELTIES!!!!

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    just a what if question. For a friend actually.

    This lady I know as what she calls the perfect Corgi (conformation wise). The corgi of course is a champion. She has been showing corgis for 12 years and breeding them. Well this "perfect" corgi used to have an umbilical hernia that was removed so she could show the dog. She insists that it is not genetic and she doesnt think she did anything wrong by removing the hernia and showing the dog.

    And she is breeding the dog.

    What do you think? Is she right, or wrong.
     
  2. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    I have no clue !!! I don't think that this is a genetic fault . Nothing I've ever had to deal with .
     
  3. colliewog

    colliewog Collies&Terriers, Oh My!

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    It can go both ways - they can be caused by the dam chewing the cord too short, but can also be a hereditary defect. Depends on the situation and the particular dog/genes.
     
  4. noludoru

    noludoru Bored Now.

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    Does she STILL have the hernia, or has it healed over? Frankly I think it's an idiotic idea if the dog still has it.
     
  5. YodelDogs

    YodelDogs New Member

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    Since umbilical hernias are so common in the Basenji breed, breeders, including myself, deal with this question frequently.

    Colliewog is correct in that umbilical hernias can be caused by the dam chewing or licking the cord excessively. They can also be inherited.

    The AKC does allow dogs whose umbilcal hernias have been repaired to show.

    Small umbilical hernias do not always have to be surgically repaired. Most do not cause problems of any kind if left alone and real small hernias often correct themselves as the pup matures.

    Large hernias should be repaired and this can be done at the same time as spay/neuter in non-breeding animals.

    Should a dog with a small hernia be bred? If the dog has a sound temperament, good conformation, and all of its other breed related health tests have had good results, then there is no reason to remove it from the gene pool. (It is basically nothing more than an "outie" belly button.)

    Should a dog with a large hernia be bred? In addition to the above, I would research to find out if this was an isolated incidence or if it was frequently occurring in the dog's relatives. Some dams are rough on pups though and they may cause hernias on multiple pups so you still won't know for sure if its inherited or not. One concern for large hernias in females is that even if they have been tacked up surgically, pregnancy can push the hernia out again and it may have to be repaired after the pups are placed.

    In my breed, there is not shame or finger-pointing for breeding animals who have small umbilical hernias. As long as the animal in question has passed its breed-related health tests, is a good example of the breed, and has a sound temperament, we're cool with it.
     
  6. HoundedByHounds

    HoundedByHounds Oh, it's *you*

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    You need to know if it is a true REDUCIBLE hernia...most aren't...or a simple delayed midline closure. That is..it WAS an opening which healed trapping a small amount of fat outside the body...which is "squooshy" but not REDUCIBLE which means you can push it UP into the body cavity and it slowly oozes back out. X ray can help...you will see a nice firm abdominal line...with a "squib" outside it in a delayed closure.

    I personally would not breed a true, reducible hernia...UNLESS I knew for a fact it was caused by dam, or human being rough with the pup. Midline closure? I would...but I'd keep a close eye on resultant get to make sure they did in fact all close.
     
  7. Whisper

    Whisper Kaleidoscopic Eye

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    I know it's off topis, but I'm kind of wary of breeders who call their show dogs "perfect." A dog can be incredibly close to the standard and still have minor faults. The dog may be an excellent dog witrh wonderful conformation, but saying its conformation is perfect, well, eh. Red has beautiful to-standard rotties but I've never heard her say they have "perfect" conformation.

    Back your regularly scheduled programming. . .
     
  8. corgi_love

    corgi_love New Member

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    Can I just be a butt and ask if it's a pembroke or cardigan? Just pure curiousity..sorry :D
     
  9. TheGoldenRetriever

    TheGoldenRetriever New Member

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    See. this would be my concern if that female were my dog. Even IF the problem was not genetic, would whelping place strain on my dog that would require the stress of a future surgery ... and at a time when she would already be stressed from whelping and nursing pups?

    I'd be more concerned for my female dog than breeding a supposedly "perfect" Corgi confirmation-wise. As someone else mentioned, I'd be wary as well of someone claiming their dog had "perfect" confirmation. Sounds suspiciously like there's more personal ego involved there than anything else.
     

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