Breeder Questionnaires

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by YodelDogs, Dec 2, 2012.

  1. YodelDogs

    YodelDogs New Member

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    How do you feel about breeders using questionnaires? Do you prefer them as a means of first communication or do you have a different preference? What kind of questions do you like seeing on a questionnaire? What kind of questions do you feel uncomfortable answering? Is there anything about a questionnaire that would completely turn you off of that breeder?
     
  2. Kilter

    Kilter New Member

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    I use one. It is long, but for the people looking, I figure if they can't take ten minutes to answer some basic questions, then they can go elsewhere. They're not going to buy a dog every day (I hope) and the questions are ones that screen out a lot of things quickly and so on. Then I have it all on paper and can keep things straight, and use that later on.

    A friend of mine does that and then when she has the litter and experienced friends coming to play with puppies and such, she's got them printed out with her own notes. In some cases it's other people reading the answers who have made comments that have changed things good or bad.

    I'll still phone people and talk in person of course, but it saves forgetting to ask things that might sound rude, like do you have kids and how old are they.
     
  3. PWCorgi

    PWCorgi Priscilla Winifred Corgi

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    I honestly like questionnaires. I think it gives a good way for breeders to weed out people they absolutely know they wouldn't sell a puppy to (though I also think they NEED to respond to the failed questionnaires and explain WHY the person failed), as well as giving a starting point when phone/email conversations start. They already have some info on what the person is looking for and how that fits with their breeding program.

    I would prefer them as first means of communication, I think it's less scary then just shooting a regular email, because I never know what to say in those!

    Fine answering about lifestyle, previous experience with dogs, WHY you want that type of dog. Fine with answering a lot of stuff, pretty much.

    I don't want to be asked what my annual income is. Because I don't think it has a whole lot of bearing on whether I get a puppy. Eventually you are going to start actually talking to the breeder, and through that they would learn that even though I don't make $100,000 a year, my dogs are never going to suffer from lack or care because of finances.

    I looked into Boston Terriers a couple years ago and was turned off to the entire community through their questionnaires. They were terribly long, and most of it wasn't even questions, but paragraphs about how you HAD to feed raw, and COULD NOT vaccinate your puppy, and COULD NOT let them have access to stairs until they were adults, etc. Then at the end of each paragraph it said "Do you agree to this?" and you had to check yes or no. THAT was a huge turn off.
     
  4. SizzleDog

    SizzleDog Lord Cynical

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    My breeder uses a questionnaire... and truth be told, I pre-screen the applicants. I actually based the questionnaire on the application we use for rescue. We like it, because it's a way to get a feel for people before they're told when the next litter is due, etc.

    It's not required that anyone fill out the questionnaire, but it has served as a great first point of contact for potential buyers who are web-savvy.

    Here's our questionnaire - asterisked items are required.

    http://brudadobes.webs.com/puppyquestionnaire.htm
     
  5. Kilter

    Kilter New Member

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    I don't bother with the 'how much do you make' but do ask 'are you prepared for the finances related to owning a dog for 15 years' and 'would you be able to handle a medical emergency with a dog, realizing that they are not covered by health care' (in Alberta/Canada, so if something happens to a human, it's generally covered - my idiot brother got a dog that was eating canned pasta as a diet and asked me who to call for a number for the dog for health care).
     
  6. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    I love questionnaires. It's so much easier for me to answer questions than for me to have an open email and kind of try to explain/describe myself.

    I much prefer them as a means of first communication. They get the awkward "what do I say/how do I introduce myself/tell them this" out of the way so that when you do talk, you can get to the real stuff and feel like they kind of know you already

    Questions I like: I like seeing "what is your average day like" "WHEN do you want to bring a puppy home/timeline for adding a dog" (hate it when that isn't included) "What would you consider your training method/do you plan to attend puppy training classes/if puppy did _______ what would your response be training wise?" (Shows the breeder cares about training etc..) "where will the puppy spend it's day?" "How do you plan on exercising your dog?" "Any activities you would like to do?"

    and my personal favorite ever was "Describe your ideal dog" :) I thought it was such a great question and I had such fun answering!

    I have heard of breeders wanting background checks and frankly if they want to include the cost in puppy price..then whatever fine lol

    I do not like seeing "How much do you make a year?"/other financial questions, anything involving my credit score/social security number/etc..etc.., marital status (because seriously..who cares?) fence height (again..who cares. If you are selling pups to people that plan to leave the dog in the yard unattended then frankly..you've got bigger problems)
    Home square footage. Seriously..when did that start measuring good ownership material?

    I HATE references. I mean the very idea of a breeder calling my friends/family/co-workers and asking them what kind of dog owner I am just..wierds me out. Vet? I understand. Trainer? Landlord? fine. But personal references for buying a dog just rubs me the wrong way.

    I do not like the color question. It just..encourages the idea of people choosing pups based on colors and it just seems silly to me. Puppies aren't made to order and you should be choosing based on temperament.


    Deal breakers: Social security/credit score/other ridiculous personal things, references other than dog related ones (like vet, trainer, landlord) sorry but you don't need to talk to my friends or my mother.

    I saw one application that DEMANDED a reference from your employer so they could be contacted. Sorry, you are not talking to my boss. No way, no how.

    Blanket statements are my ultimate deal breaker. "We do not sell puppies to people with children under 12, people who rent, people with fence heights below 6 feet, people under 30, people who don't work from home etc.."
    even if none of the blanket statements apply to me.. I don't want to work with a breeder who just groups people up like that. It's a bad attitude.
     
  7. Toller_08

    Toller_08 Active Member

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    I seem to be in the minority here in that I love e-mailing breeders. I also find filling out questionnaires to be interesting and enjoy that too. But I wouldn't want to fill out a questionnaire in place of e-mailing the breeder. The questionnaire is great for answering very important questions clearly so the breeder can easily reference to it when choosing a puppy for me (assuming they approve of my answers), but the body of the e-mail is where I tell them a little about who I am, what I like about their breed, what I want in a dog, what I like about their dogs and their breeding program, about my beliefs vaccine and feeding wise, training wise, etc. I don't like to answer questionnaires too indepth because then it just gets looking messy, so the e-mail is where I go into a lot more detail. And in my experience, most breeders seem to prefer a long informative e-mail to one lacking in details, although sometimes it gets too long and I apologize for writing them a whole story haha. But the last handful of breeders I've e-mailed over the past couple of years have all said how much they appreciated the detail in my e-mail. So I think both are important. My only issue with breeder communication is that I don't know whether I should phone them or not after I've provided a lengthy e-mail and filled out their questionnaire.

    Honestly I haven't had an issue with any of the questions asked on Aussie puppy's questionnaire or the Toller breeder's questionnaire I filled out earlier in the year either. I think all of the questions are pretty important and I'd rather them know as much about my preferences and where and how my puppy will be living as possible. Even colour could be important because some people would prefer to wait for a litter producing the colour they want. I personally don't care - I listed my colour preference in order but made note that colour was of the very, very least importance to me.

    I didn't care for a past questionnaire I filled out before I got Dance asking about my age and marital status and annual income. I was only 17, and right away breeders wanted to cross me off the list regardless of anything else they knew about me and my devotion to my dogs. I can see why age should matter, but a breeder IMO should take the time to learn more, because I felt that at even 17 I was a better dog owner than a lot of adults seeking a dog.

    The yard and home square footage I sort of understand, but at the same time I think is something a breeder should look into a little more because plenty of dog savvy homes don't let their home or yard size dictate the kind of exercise the dog gets.

    I saw one questionnaire once with a blanket statement saying that the breeder would not even remotely consider selling a puppy to a multi dog home, and this was not a breed prone to DA. Just that the breeder wanted their puppy to be the sole centre of attention. I thought that was silly and would never bother with a breeder like that considering I like a multi dog home.

    Things that turn me off of breeders, as others have said, is when things are dictated as to what you can and cannot do. You have to feed this certain brand of food, you have to go to these exact types of classes, you have to follow this vaccination protocol exactly, your dog can never be boarded at a boarding facility, etc. Just the way it's said comes across as a little much. I understand having a preference to sell to homes that do certain things, but it could be worded nicer sometimes. Contracts and questionnaires I've seen like that usually don't affect me because I believe in the same things the breeder does, but still. I prefer it be worded something like "preference will be given to raw feeding homes" for example. Not you MUST feed this diet or else kind of wording.

    I also kind of have a problem with references. Not because there is anything to hide, but because I don't know who could give me a reference other than my Dobermans' breeder. My vet retired, I've switched training classes and instructors lots of times depending on which area of the city I live in, etc. But hopefully a breeder could be happy with whatever reference I could provide and understand why I don't have one they specifically asked for.

    All in all though, of the questionnaires I've filled out, I can't really complain about any of them and imagine that if I were a breeder, I'd probably ask similar questions to get a decent initial feel for a person.
     
  8. ~WelshStump~

    ~WelshStump~ New Member

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    Been sitting on this question, trying to figure how best to formulate an answer, done for me!>
    Agree with everything.
    I will add though, I did ask Enda's breeder in a quick email before filling out the pre-screening questionnaire that I was looking specifically for a dog who I could show (leaving them intact) and it would be a first for me, did she feel comfortable with this? She said yes, obviously. I did get a feeling from the first breeder, after going through everything on the phone similar to filling out an online questionnaire except over the phone, that she wasn't feeling as comfortable with the same situation, oh well, but either or I do prefer breeder questionnaires over going into it blind as described in Frans post above.
     
  9. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    I don't mind breeder questionnaires but so far have not gone to a breeder that uses them. Summer's breeder is very old school and wanted a face to face interview after the first phone call (for Beau, by the time I got Summer I didn't need to interview). Mia's breeder and I just exchanged emails for a bit.

    I get discouraged when I see these questionnaires that are 3+ pages long. Really? Why can't we just do the basics and then have a conversation about everything else? Don't get me wrong, I like an involved breeder but I'd much rather just do an informal chat/question and answer than a form that asks every little thing and wants tons of references.
     
  10. Lyzelle

    Lyzelle New Member

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    All of this, pretty much. I don't particularly like training questions or trainer references, though. Same with food. I have my outlines, but don't ask me anything specific when I don't even have a specific dog to figure out these things. I am NOT the type of person that says "One size fits all" to my dogs.

    Hate personal references. Sorry. My mom's nuts and I have no friends. Don't know what else to tell you.

    Hate the whole backyard/fence/house question. No, I do NOT need 3000sqft house in order to "properly house" a Siberian or Malamute. No, I do NOT need an amazing backyard and fence when 90% of the time the dog is going out on a leash anyway and I'm active enough to keep the dog WELL entertained.

    Do not ask me if I'm okay with keeping MY dog on YOUR retainer for breeding purposes and then get pissy when I tell you MY dog will be MY pet first and foremost and will be handled and managed as a family member. If you want a dog on breeding retainer, and want someone else to pay all the vetting and expenses and take the gamble of losing their dog, why don't you just KEEP A PROSPECT?!

    I don't mind thorough breeders. I do not like crazy irrational breeders. (and some of this applies to rescues, too)
     
  11. OwnedByBCs

    OwnedByBCs Will Creep For Sheep

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    Anyone can check out my questionnaire, its pretty short and sweet since I want to ask most of the questions myself. http://www.brigadoonbordercollies.com/about-us/littersavailable/puppy-questionnaire/ One question that some people ask me about is "If this puppy is purchased as a companion or performance prospect, do you agree to have it spayed or neutered before the age of 2?". The thing is- "No" is a perfectly reasonable answer, I just want to know what the intention behind that is. Is it because this person just doesn't like spaying and neutering, and has no plans to breed? Is it because this person doesn't want to show, but wants to do agility and herding, but plans on having a litter? Is this person totally irresponsible and wants to breed their female to their dog Blue because he's so pretty and smart?

    I don't ask for references- because I don't give a flying crap what other people think of potential puppy buyers. I know some of the most unethical show mill breeders who would get 100 recommendations. I want to make my own mind up about people. I've never had a huge issue with any of my puppy buyers.

    Most of all, I want people to feel like they can be honest with me. For example, one of the people who was on my list for a Fiona puppy said that they did the occasional sport mix. I asked if that was their plan for this pup, and their response was "only if you're ok with that". I was allowed to say "No, I wouldn't be comfortable with that" and that was that. She is still on my list and we moved on from that. I don't want people to feel like they have to sneak behind my back because I am so overbearing and strict- I have DEFINITELY felt like that with other breeders and I hated it.

    I don't care where my puppy buyers live. If you live on a 200 acre ranch and your dog spends its life in a kennel, you are not a better home than someone who lives in a one bedroom apartment and jogs with their dog every day. JMO.

    I just want to see my puppies loved, first and foremost. Sometimes that means that they don't all end up in glamorous homes with people who trial them every weekend, but thats ok. One of the thing that really bothers me is seeing on puppy questionnaires and contracts: "This dog will be shown to his championship/MACH/OTCH/HC (or whatever) within 2 years, even if this means hiring a professional at the owner's expense, or the dog will be shown by the breeder whenever he or she chooses" (that's slight paraphrasing, but you get what I mean). I'm sorry, but no. If one of my puppy buyers gets a show puppy and never shows it, it's not a big deal to me. One, because that sort of stuff doesn't mean that much to me, but also because I get that there are more important things, and I'm not about to go kidnap someone's dog because I feel the need to prove myself to other breeders.

    I may have more rants about stupid breeder BS, but I can't think of them.
     
  12. Southpaw

    Southpaw orange iguanas.

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    I love questionnaires. It is just downright near impossible for me to start with a completely blank slate and formulate an email. What does the breeder want to know? What do I feel is important to share? Does this breeder want a novel and life story, or just a quick paragraph?

    With a questionnaire I at least know what the breeder wants answers to, and then I can go on to answer in detail. If there is an "anything else you'd like me to know?" question, then I can fill in the blanks with whatever info I want to share, but wasn't specifically asked about.

    I've only filled out one questionnaire before and it was pretty simple. Do you own or rent, what is your schedule like, what will you do with the puppy when you're not home, what pets do you currently own, what activities do you plan on doing with puppy, what kind of personality traits are you looking for.... all seemed like basic and perfectly acceptable questions for a breeder to want to know.

    I don't really mind answering in-depth questions, but I haven't really done any breeder shopping so I have yet to see any extreme questionnaires. The questionnaire that I filled out had no probing questions, but I freely offered up information about my age and my "experience" with the breed, because I wanted that out there from the get go (this was a couple years ago - so I think my age was more of a factor then it would be now).

    I'll definitely still contact breeders without a questionnaire, but it makes it waaayyy easier for me to form coherent thoughts if I have a prompt to follow :p
     
  13. SevenSins

    SevenSins Guest

    This is ours. For the most part, the questions are designed to not necessarily have a "right" or a "wrong" answer to pick from. A couple probably seem more invasive than others, like the one that asks if any members of the household are physically, mentally or emotionally impaired, but that's another question that doesn't have a defined "right" or "wrong" answer; If a member of the household has a disability, and I can get someone to tell me so up front in a less personal setting (rather than making them feel awkward by bringing it up in later conversation, if they're uncomfortable with the question(s) they simply don't have to fill out the application), that gives me all the more time to learn about it and discuss it with them so that I can make a more informed decision about puppy placement, not because having a disabled person in the household will necessarily exclude them. I also designed the questionnaire to take at least a little bit of effort to complete simply because the vast majority of breeders in my breed, including so-called reputable show breeders, literally sell their puppies through an e-mail inquiry that consists of, "Hey, what picks do you have open on XX breeding and what are you asking for females?" To answer the OP's question, I wish more breeders in my breed used them, and I do personally prefer them as a means of first communication in my breed because it's extremely efficient in weeding out tire-kickers and the "Hey, you got any blues?" guy.

    Seven Sins American Pit Bull Terriers
    Puppy Questionnaire

    As breeders of American Pit Bull Terriers, it is our responsibility to ensure that every puppy we produce is placed in the most appropriate environment for that individual puppy. We do not accept deposits on puppies, thereby making potential puppy buyers feel obligated to purchase a puppy that they may not be happy with, and we do not believe in blindly placing puppies with individuals based on little more than “pick order.†As such, we ask that you please complete the following questionnaire to the best of your ability, thoroughly, and most importantly, honestly.

    Several of the questions below are designed to be answered in detailed sentences or paragraphs so that we may get to know you through your own words, rather than simply "yes" or "no;" The more details you can share with us, the more you will be helping us to place the right puppy with you, if approved.

    Please copy and paste this questionnaire into your word processor of choice in order to complete it. You may attach either a .doc or .rtf file directly to an e-mail and mail this questionnaire back to us at: [removed]


    • Name:
    • Address:
    • City:
    • State/Province:
    • Zip/Postal Code:
    • Country:
    • Phone #:
    • E-mail Address:
    What is your preferred contact method, and the best time to reach you?

    Have you ever owned an American Pit Bull Terrier?

    What attracted you to this breed?

    Tell us about all of the pets currently living in your household. Please list species or breeds, as well as their ages and genders, and whether they are spayed or neutered.

    If you have owned any pets prior to the ones listed above, what happened to those pets? Have you returned a pet to a breeder, sold or given a pet away, euthanized a pet, or turned a pet over to a shelter or rescue group? What were the circumstances?

    What type (and brand, if applicable) of food do you feed to your current dog(s)?

    How many people currently live in your household, including yourself, and what are their ages? Are any members of your household physically, mentally, or emotionally impaired?

    Who will be the primary caregiver for this puppy?

    Is everyone living in your household in agreement with getting a new puppy?

    What type of housing do you live in, and do you rent or own your home? Are you planning a move in the foreseeable future?

    Would you prefer a male or a female puppy? Why?

    What are you hoping to do, or accomplish with, your new puppy? Conformation shows, weightpull, obedience, agility, sports such as flyball, breeding, and/or family companion? Please feel free to mention anything that we may not have listed.

    On an average day, how much total time do you expect that the puppy will be left alone? Additionally, what is the longest consecutive amount of time that you expect for the puppy to be left alone?

    How do you plan to house the puppy in the daytime, and at night? Will the puppy be loose in the house, outside in a kennel, outside on a chain, etc? Do you intend to crate train the puppy?

    Do you have a fenced yard? If so, what type of fence, and how tall is it at its lowest point? If you do not have a fenced yard, how do you plan to potty and exercise your puppy?

    Are you aware of the tendencies for American Pit Bull Terriers toward animal aggression, regardless of whether they have been raised and socialized with other animals?

    How have you prepared yourself, particularly if you have a multiple animal household, should your new puppy become animal aggressive at any point during its adult life?

    Would you be willing to sign a legally binding contract, agreeing to return the dog to us at any point in his or her life, should you need to rehome the dog for any reason?

    Would you be willing to have the dog PennHIP x-rayed and OFA certified via cardiologist at an appropriate age, and provide us with the reports, regardless of the outcome?

    How do you plan to bring your puppy home? Will you be driving to pick the puppy up in person, or will you be using an airline?

    Would you be willing to allow us, or someone whom we trust to represent us, to come and do a home inspection prior to agreeing to place a puppy with you?


    • Please provide us with your current veterinarian’s contact information. If you do not have a current veterinarian, please provide us with the information for a veterinarian you have used in the recent past.
     
  14. Oko

    Oko Silence, peasants.

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    I can see why they'd be good, but I'm more comfortable writing my own email and pulling my thoughts together that way. The thing I really hate to see on them is questions designed to 'catch you' being wrong. If someone's new to the dog-buying or owning process, that seems a little unfair.
     
  15. speedydogs

    speedydogs Allons-y!

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    I really like questionnaires. I'm a little anal and have a thing for lists, so it's just a good way to hit all the questions I want to ask without leaving anything out. Like others have said, none of the questions I ask really have a right or wrong, which encourages people to be honest. I try not to make it too long or difficult to fill out either - some people give me one word responses, while others give me their life story in essays. :) Either is fine. I guess some questions might seem invasive (I ask if any household members have disabilities, ages of kids in the home) but people always have the option of leaving those blank. I haven't had any problems with that though - I think it's much easier to bring up those kinds of things in a written, Q&A format than in conversation. I do ask for a vet reference, but in all honesty I don't usually call them because I know the puppy buyer well enough by that point. I'd only call if I was unsure of the suitability of a home.

    I don't think that a questionnaire should ever be a substitute for dialogue. When someone emails me, I always exchange several emails with them before sending the questionnaire - answering all of their questions, telling them about our dogs and breeding plans, etc. This lets me build a bit of a relationship first, and weed out the people who make me uncomfortable right from the get-go; those ones usually get the "Oh sorry, the waiting list is full!" replies.

    Here's ours (in the process of copying this, I realized that it's been saved as "Questionairre" instead of "Questionnaire" the entire time. Oops. Sorry puppy people, I'm not actually an idiot, I just pretend sometimes)

    Aurai Sighthounds Puppy Questionnaire
    Contact Info

    Date:
    Name(s):
    Address:
    Email:
    Phone Number(s) (and best time to reach you):
    Occupation(s):

    Puppy Preferences

    Gender:
    [ ] Male
    [ ] Female
    [ ] No preference

    About You
    Is everyone in your household in agreement with adding a dog to the family?

    Describe your household - how many people are living in your home? If you have children, please list their ages and anything else that might be relevant.

    What type of home do you have?
    [ ] House
    [ ] Townhouse
    [ ] Apartment/Condo
    [ ] Farm
    [ ] Other (please describe)

    What type of community do you live in?
    [ ] Urban
    [ ] Suburban
    [ ] Rural

    Do you own or rent? If you rent, will you be able to provide us with written permission from your landlord allowing you to have a dog?

    Does anyone in your family have any disabilities, serious allergies, or any other health problems that might relate to which type of dog would be suitable?

    Please list all pets you currently own, including species, breed/mix, gender, and whether they are spayed or neutered.

    Do you have a fenced-in yard? If so, please describe it (size, height, type of fence – chain link, invisible, etc). If not, please describe how you plan to exercise your dog.

    Who will be the primary caretaker(s) of the dog?

    Have you owned dogs in the past? If they are no longer with you, please tell us what happened to them.

    Where will the dog live primarily (indoors, outdoors)?

    Is someone home during the day? If not, how many hours will the puppy be alone and what arrangements will you make for him/her?

    Do you allow dogs on the furniture?

    Where will your dog sleep at night?

    Please provide the contact information (name, clinic, and phone number) of your current veterinarian as a reference. If this does not apply to you, please provide the contact info for another relevant person to use as a reference.

    How did you decide on the Longhaired Whippet as the breed for you?

    What activities, if any, are you planning to pursue or might be interested in pursuing in the future? Check any and all that apply.
    [ ] Conformation
    [ ] Lure Coursing/Racing
    [ ] Obedience/Rally
    [ ] Agility
    [ ] Hiking/Jogging
    [ ] Hunting
    [ ] Therapy
    [ ] Service
    [ ] Other (please list)

    If you’re not planning on (a) showing your dog or (b) getting your puppy with a breeding contract, would you be willing to spay or neuter him/her?

    Are you planning to attend puppy classes?

    If circumstances change and you are no longer able to care for your dog, would you be willing to return the dog to us?

    This information will be used to help find the perfect Longhaired Whippet for you. If we don’t have the right one, do we have your permission to forward this to other breeders?

    My contact info
     
  16. ~WelshStump~

    ~WelshStump~ New Member

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    I do like what Ownedby, Seven, and Speedydogs have said best, to have it mostly set up so that there really isn't a "right and wrong" answer. We all know how situations could sound so great yet be used so badly, such as "I have a large fully fenced yard" and yet the never walk the dog or train it or even clean up the yard, where someone in a small two bedroom apartment spends at least a few hours a day jogging and spending time with nature.
     
  17. YodelDogs

    YodelDogs New Member

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    Thank you to everyone who responded. I have never used questionnaires with my litters as I have always felt that people are more likely to be dishonest with their answers when they have time to think about an answer than if speaking directly to them on the phone and they have to answer right away. Now that I have thought about it, a brief questionnaire would be a better way of opening conversation than me asking "please tell me a bit about your family and what you are looking for in a dog".

    Now, does anyone know of a good (free) program that would allow me to make a questionnaire form that people fill in the blanks or do multiple choice for? Something that when once made I can just copy/paste the html onto a webpage?
     
  18. monkeys23

    monkeys23 New Member

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    I don't mind a good questionairre. Actually it totally appeals to my ocd organization tendancies, lol.

    I've only filled out one in my breeder search and honestly I feel like the breeders I've chatted with without one, I not only shared all the same information, but I was more upfront about asking them about things like epilepsy, etc. in the lines and more comfortable discussing things like environmental/social soundness. I think that's more me clarifying to myself what I want in future puppeh and breeder than anything to do with having a questionairre or not though. :)
     
  19. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    I've always liked the ones that are just a word document and instructions to attach to an email. It leaves more room for longer answers, adding your own thoughts etc..

    the fill in the blank ones on websites feel like I'm ordering something off amazon or something
     
  20. Lyzelle

    Lyzelle New Member

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    Agreed. Like my mother for instance.

    The only questions I have a hard time answering that are actually legitimate questions are about base housing. The housing office doesn't care what animal we get or have as long as it isn't on the banned list. So I'm typically really happy to fax/attach a copy of the Pet portion of our lease to my email. I mean, technically, it's a "renting" situation, right? But for some reason it always ends up super awkward, if they respond at all. Like military = instant no. Let alone if I answer the "Ages" question. Then that's a "Hell no".

    I should just go with Chaz people who already "know me". And I know them. Dogs are awesome. And their questionnaire's aren't awkward. :lol-sign:

    I'd just use Microsoft Word, or a similar program. I don't like any of the Adobe questionnaire's because it's impossible to fill out the form without printing it, hand writing, then copying it again. Then it's just a mess. Plus, Word documents can be copied and posted right into the email or sent as an attachment to an email, and virtually everyone has that program and would be able to open it. If I have to download something in order to get the breeder's questionnaire, it isn't happening.
     

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