Breed Suggestions for child's obedience dog

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by stafinois, Dec 15, 2011.

  1. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    An AKC staffy bull?
     
  2. thehoundgirl

    thehoundgirl Active Member

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    A Schnauzer? They are not exactly short haired, but fairly easy to groom and very easy to handle. Atleast my Dixie is!
     
  3. Danefied

    Danefied New Member

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    Me, I'd go to the local pound or shelter and see what kind of mutt dog is there that's smart, drivey, and good with kids.

    A couple months ago a local shelter had a shepherd mix looking thing with a slick-ish coat who could have made someone an awesome competition dog. Shoot, my own competition dog is a mutt foundling.
     
  4. DobeLove

    DobeLove New Member

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    If she wants to do AKC juniors and be competitive, most of these dogs listed it will be hard to do. (There have been a few people that do well with less flashy breeds, but the flashier the breed the more the junior wins usually.) Less common breeds don't usually do as well either.

    I'm not sure how small you want, but Papillons, Pugs, and Cavaliers came to mind. Even thought Cavaliers and Papillons have hair, they don't have a ton of grooming.
     
  5. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

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    It's true that there are breeds which tend to do better in AKC Juniors. But I think it's also important Juniors show the breed they enjoy. There are Juniors doing well with all different breeds. With AKC Juniors especially at the higher levels, a show quality dog is sort of important regardless of breed though. Minor cosmetic things that would cause a dog not to be showable can be ok (mismarks, bad bites, oversize/undersize) but dogs with poor movement/structure or dogs with poor or very different type from what is usually seen in the ring can be more challenging to succeed with. Of course at the higher levels, it is often possible to show someone else's dog that might be more suitable as a Juniors dog. So one could always start with the dog they have and aim to find a breed/breeder to work with in the future if they want to show with a dog who is more showy or competitive in the ring.
     
  6. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    Yeah Mia would be a bad choice. LOL but I think paps in general are great for old enough kids that know not to jump on them. They're typically super handler focused, very eager to please and easy to work with, affectionate, pretty mild temperament, happy, fun...

    Cattle dogs around here are very much harder dogs than BCs. Dog aggression and lots of guarding instinct. BCs strike me as much much softer and less demanding. But I grew up in Texas and there's a load of truly working bred cattle dogs there. They're a ton of dog.
     
  7. Dekka

    Dekka Just try me..

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    Yes the working ones I know are a lot of dog. And the confo ones I know are very non cattle dog like (think labs..) The in between ones seem to be a nice balance for sport dogs. One of the 4H leaders around here breeds and shows them. His lack drive for my taste, but some of the split dogs have more drive with out a lot of edge.
     
  8. dignity

    dignity Pyr Pressure

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    I vote for smooth collie. Just make sure it's from an ethical breeder as some collie lines are not the best.
     
  9. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    Me too. :D A couple of Keegan's brothers have gone on to live with young kids, and as far as I know they're doing great. You'll probably have better luck finding a rough collie - they're much more common so breeders are easier to find.... roughs also tend to be slightly more laid-back, less intense - but if hair is a big issue then go with a smooth. You should be able to find a smooth bitch that's around 50 pounds, IMO not a large dog.
     
  10. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    Keegan's mom had never been around kids until she was an adult. The instant she saw toddler Aurelia she melted into a puddle of goo and was like, "I LOOOOVE it and I don't know why! But I LOOOOOVE it!" :rofl1:
     
  11. Kat09Tails

    Kat09Tails *Now with Snark*

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    I don't usually recommend papillons for kids. There is a certain level of error that is allowed with larger/heavier boned breeds of dogs that just doesn't work with a papillon. Kids are clumsy, kids do things without thinking through all the consequences, and I've seen too many pet papillons pay the more severe price of that thinking than a dog of heavier bone would.

    That said with the right family where the parents were doing 90% of the dog raising I don't see it being a problem having the kid handle. I just don't see them as a kid's dog.
     
  12. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    The only reason I would suggest one is that they said the kid was dog savvy. We've had toy breeds since Josie was really young and she's always been very gentle. But she's a gentle, calm kid too.
     
  13. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    I can imagine that. :p
     
  14. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    Logan loves kids but Gavroche ADORES them. He falls all over himself to see a kid (or a statue of a kid lol). I've heard that's true of many boxers. A female of either a boxer or collie could easily be in the 50-pound range (boxers maybe even the 40-lb range for a small female). Logan's sister Gala is pretty small, but I don't know how much she weighs...then again compared to Logan ALL the other collies were small lol.

    Gavroche is very small for a male boxer at 54 pounds. I've seen multiple females at 40-45 pounds. He's 22" tall, but again, I've seen many shorter than he is. His coat is the easiest thing in the world to take care of. He's a lovable mush but is also very, very eager and willing to learn with a good amount of drive (now that he's not living under a blanket like last year). He's a little overbearing with my nephew, but my nephew is NOT dog savvy in any way shape or form. I would have been THRILLED with Gavorche when I was a kid.

    Boxers are also pretty rough-and-tumble and hard to break.
     
  15. Danefied

    Danefied New Member

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    I have a boxer mutt, and with him its true too - he ADORES kids.

    Everything you say is very true IME boxers, BUT.... Around here, all I see are BYB boxers who while they're terrific with the kids are super reactive around other dogs and will escalate (not something I'd want a kid to have to deal with), then on top of that, they drop like flies after about 3 years of various genetic joint issues, cancer, heart issues.... Its just sad. You'd have to be super savvy in your breeder search, that's for sure. Then there's still the reactivity issue.
     
  16. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

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    I agree - it depends on a lot on the kid. And a 10 year old is certainly old enough to understand the dog isn't a toy.
     
  17. Katkoota

    Katkoota cRaZy AbOuT DOGS

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    miniature poodle. I had mine as a kid. Great with kids. They are not as fragile. They are sturdy ;) Intelligent. My Melon was perfect in this department. sure are awesome at working with you.
     
  18. stafinois

    stafinois Professional Nerd

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    OK, the fictional family is us in about 6 years. So, the child's prior dog experience has been with an AmStaf and a working bred Malinois. I was curious as to what people would suggest.

    By the time Syd is old enough to show in 4H, Grant will be gone. The next dog that I'm getting will be for me, and will probably be too much dog for a little girl to show. Besides with the rules, my dog will likely have enough training and titles by then that if she were to show, she would have to be in the advanced classes with the teenagers.

    I said small both because the dog would be for a little girl, and because my husband wants to get down to a one dog household. I doubt I could get him to go for another big dog, but I might be able to talk him into a little dog for his baby's 4H project. Ha!

    High on the list are Bostons and Papillons, but the Paps have more fur than I want. It's not too poofy of a coat, though, so they haven't been written off entirely.

    I wonder how Brussels Griffons are? A smooth red was one of the few dogs that made my husband remark on its cuteness without being prompted.
     
  19. Kat09Tails

    Kat09Tails *Now with Snark*

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    My ex had brussels - I really wouldn't suggest bostons or papillons for kids. If I can make a suggestion it would be to get a working line teckel - it'll appeal to your more working dog nature and be an easily sturdy 4Hable dog.
     
  20. stafinois

    stafinois Professional Nerd

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    A Dachshund is definitely not something I want. I'm not so sure they are a good choice for obedience dogs. And, I've never heard anybody says that Bostons aren't good dogs for kids. May I ask why?

    Keep in mind that we aren't going to hand a random little kid a dog and let her have at it. This is a child that has been raised by a parent that actually knows what they were doing. To be bluntly honest, she's 4yo now and I feel confidant that she wouldn't break a little dog. At 10 I would bet that she will be even more conscientious. Remember, not everybody is an idiot.
     

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