Breed Recommendations for my SO

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by Kirsten&Gypsy, Mar 3, 2013.

  1. Kirsten&Gypsy

    Kirsten&Gypsy New Member

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    My fiance, like me, is a huge dog lover. He's had dogs growing up, and when we get a place together, he'd very much like to have one of his own. (Don't worry, we'll stagger the acquisitions of my new pup and his.) He's not quite as breed savvy as I am, so I suggested we ask my forums for recommendations.

    He's on the fence about puppy v. adult. He'd certainly consider, even prefer, Petfinder and breed rescues. However, a good breeder is a possibility, especially if he goes the puppy route. Please feel free to recommend breeds anywhere from common to rare.

    *Energy level: Low to medium. At minimum, the dog will have daily play in the house and probably a daily walk, with occasional park visits. Possibly more than that, since my SO has been wanting to get more active. Plus, I'm very active with my dog, and there would be times when I would take both dogs out. When we're living together, he's likely to be active with me. But a more chill dog is definitely ideal.

    *Trainability: Functional obedience is desired. The dog should be, without unreasonable time and effort, able to housebreak, crate train, not jump up or door dash, & sit on command. Definitely doesn't need to be a breed that is inclined to learn a huge repertoire of tricks, though.

    *Friendliness w/ Family: He wants a dog that is affectionate with its people - ideally a dog that will hang out on the couch and generally want to be around what's going on. The extreme of clingy would be desired over the opposite extreme, a totally independent dog that does it's own thing constantly. However, the ideal would be affection without pushiness or a constant NEED for it.

    Friendliness w/ Strangers: Not important; anything from super friendly to aloof is fine. The ideal would be pleasant, but aloof.

    Friendliness w/ Other Pets: Needs to handle another dog in the house and be manageable with other animals. Dog doesn't need to be a social butterfly. Prey drive is okay.

    *Vocality: The quieter the better. Alert barking and occasional play barking is okay, but chatty breeds probably not.

    Coat maintenence: Not important. Ideally, a wash and wear coat with no grooming.

    Size: Not important. Ideally, 35 - 50 lbs.

    Health: No major health problems, unless going to a good breeder could mostly eliminate risk.
     
  2. Catsi

    Catsi New Member

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    A whippet sounds like it could be a very good fit. The exercise would be adequate, but they'll take anything you throw at them.

    Great at coexisting with other pets (especially since prey drive is not an issue), very friendly and affectionate with people. I haven't found them to be that sighthoundish when it comes to independence level.

    The gorgeous man that I am familiar with could be seen as being aloof around strangers, but I think it's more that he is shy. Which brings me to my next point - make sure you research lines, meet dogs and breeders etc and stack your odds to get the temperament you want. It's definitely there in many whippets (I have met some really, really outgoing ones, some softer ones, some that could only be described as timid) and I guess it's like any breed you are interested in.

    Coat is definitely low maintenance and they seem to be a very clean and low odour dog. Obviously a whippet is a little bit lighter than you listed, but they are a light framed dog, so I think they are still in the size bracket really. :)

    I cannot speak for every whippet, but the ones I know rarely bark. I have heard my grandmother's whippet bark once and I think he even shocked himself. :p

    I can't confidently answer the health question in regards to where you are, but in Australia they are a healthy, long-lived breed.
     
  3. Kirsten&Gypsy

    Kirsten&Gypsy New Member

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    Thank you, Catsi! Great suggestion! :)

    I think whippets are pretty healthy around here too. Most sighthounds are, one of the reasons I'm personally drawn to the group.
     
  4. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    I'm not sure how your area is with BSL, but I think if he's getting an adult dog, a rescue pit would fit pretty well. Some of them, especially younger ones, can be high energy, and boisterous, and you want to make sure you choose one that will get along with the other dog(s) in the household, but otherwise it pretty perfectly fits your requirements, especially if you rescue a 3+ year old dog.

    A smaller greyhound would also be a pretty good choice, I think.
     
  5. SevenSins

    SevenSins APBTs & One Crazy Banana

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    The only thing you can determine is if the dog will get along with other dogs in the household on that day. There is no guarantee from one day to the next that you won't wake up one morning, go to take the dogs out, and find out the hard way that you're going to have to change your lifestyle to cater to a crate and rotate schedule for the rest of their life. If that isn't something that someone is fully prepared for and willing to take on, an APBT is not the right breed for them.
     
  6. Kirsten&Gypsy

    Kirsten&Gypsy New Member

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    Yeah, DA is probably not something we'd want to deal with. A crate/rotate lifestyle is not for us. I'd constantly worry about aggression cropping up and one of the dogs getting injured.
     
  7. CharlieDog

    CharlieDog Rude and Not Ginger

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    The right Lab would also fit. I know most of them are more into people than they are aloof, but it's been known to happen. OR the right Chessie. As an adult that is. Lab puppies are NUTS. I'm not sure about Chessie puppies, but rescue is overflowing with adult labs that should fit ALL of those descriptions.
     
  8. Kootenay

    Kootenay Active Member

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    Rough or Smooth Collie? A little bigger perhaps but fit most specifications. My Rough is super mellow, he'll take all the exercise I give him (which is generally a lot) but he's content to sleep all day too. Super super loving with his people, more aloof with people he doesn't know (but not anywhere near shy). Easy to train, easy to live with, even being a Rough his coat isn't too much work.

    Healthwise, you'd want to pick your breeder I think.
     

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