biddability, energy, and "velcroness"

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by GoingNowhere, Feb 23, 2014.

  1. GoingNowhere

    GoingNowhere Active Member

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    Kootenay -that sheepdog mix you posted is the most adorable thing in the world! Kind of reminds me of Southpaw's Happy.

    :)
     
  2. Kootenay

    Kootenay Active Member

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    Isn't she just? I really feel like there needs to be an "Inka" breed, she is just the most amazing dog. Here are a couple more photos, haha...

    [​IMG]

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  3. Eleonora

    Eleonora Member

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    My friend had found this thread. She thought she could comment few things altough she's not so sure if she knows what the words "drive" and "biddability" mean (we are from Finland).

    My friend knows that the breed affects on how well one can teach things to the dog. Some breeds just naturally know how to work with their owners whereas others are more independent. Then things should be done differently with them. She knows that some breeds are easier to train than others. When my friend has seen dogs on TV and in videos that are easy to train, they have often been border collies, german shepherds etc. It seems to my friend that those breeds just naturally know how to work with their owners. My friend has a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. She hasn't seen Cavalier's for example in tutorials. (She means actual tutorials for example from Kikopup where they tell and show how to teach things.) Cavalier's naturally know how to look at their owners. In those Cavaliers that are in those trick videos my friend has seen that skill has progressed so that they know how to work with their owners. However, most of the Cavalier's she has seen in videos, do silly things like Lotta does. Although they should be easy to train, Lotta is more similar to those breeds that are more independent.

    Lotta doesn't know how to work with my friend although she already knows how to look at her. That's why it may be difficult to teach her things although my friend often gets her to do something. Lotta also doesn't know how to distinguish play times and training sessions from each other. That's why she just acts silly and doesn't always do what she should be doing in training. It's also so that some of the things that work with other dogs, gets Lotta to behave in different ways than they should. It's because of this: many dogs understand that if they do X and what happens because of that is something they don't like about, they should do Y instead whereas Lotta doesn't understand that. My friend means that some individuals like Lotta don't understand some things the same way as other dogs do. So things should be done differently with them.

    My friend can't say if Lotta has soft or hard temperament but she behaves by similar ways. :rofl1: She is not talking about counter surfing though.

    So, we have told what kinf of dog Lotta is. What kind of words would you use to describe her?

    We had created a thread where my friend is asking advice on how to teach Lotta to work with her: How to teach the dog to work with her/his owner?
     

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