Acting like a bat out of hell....

Discussion in 'Dogs - General Dog Chat' started by HayleyMarie, Jul 28, 2014.

  1. HayleyMarie

    HayleyMarie Like a bat outa' hell

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    when you let Panzer out of his kennel. Panzer literately starts body slamming you while he is in mid air and tries to jump on you and booty hip checks you. And just becomes a total happy freak out show.

    So I need some ideas on how to alter this behavior to a more acceptable one. I should add I don't let his out of his kennel until he has settled down and I even make him wait after I open the door, but that all goes to hell when I release him.

    And its not fun having this beast of an animal come at you full force lol
     
  2. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    Mia does that with any door. Of course it's a big difference- she's 8 lbs. lol

    Having her sit and wait actually amps her up more. Even waiting till she is calm appearing, she will come out screaming and racing and redirecting on Summer.

    What has helped is having her do something once she's out. So instead of focus on having her wait in the crate for the release word (amps her up), I will release her then have her sit. Then she gets rewarded for a sit and released. Then I may ask for something again. I like to vary it so she doesn't predict when to 'go wild'. It wasn't long before she realized that she needed to keep an eye on me and not go screaming because I might ask for something from her.
     
  3. Greenmagick

    Greenmagick New Member

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    Can you redirect him to a toy? Like a tug? I know for Qcumber (and Ivy when she was younger a bit) sitting still and being calm often amped them up more. They would then explode and yes, slam into people, walls, furniture etc lol. It hurts! I would redirect them immediately to a quick game of tug or fetch or even just a mission to go find a toy. It gave them a physical outlet for that pent up energy but still kept it a bit more controlled and calm.
     
  4. *blackrose

    *blackrose "I'm kupo for kupo nuts!"

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    Abrams does something very similar when being let in from outside, greeting times, and food times. Especially food times. Like was mentioned before, trying to make him settle before entering/petting/feeding just makes him that much more crazy when released. But redirecting him after the exciting thing happens makes it better.

    (Although with him, he doesn't make contact, just fails around and acts like he's going to, so I tend to just let him do it. Besides. A dog leaping as high and far as he can through the kitchen towards his bowl is funny. LOL)
     
  5. Ozfozz

    Ozfozz Highbread Dingbat

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    Have you tried being totally neutral when he is let out? Post-like almost, just standing straight, ignoring him outright, neutral voices.

    It's not the most fun solution of course, but if it works, once he settles you can reward the calm behaviour.
     
  6. Applebear

    Applebear New Member

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    My chow, Ro was a real stinker with getting vamped like this after I had been away [I keep him gated to kitchen area] and just returning. I tell him back, open gate when he does and simply not acknowledged as I have all ready turned and walked away [or through if I am heading in that way]...I just give him a little to relax [ignore if he tries to jump or any unwanted behavior], then take time to give him lovies [we can get excited/happy, just not jumping on mommy like a monkey excited]. He has learned to tone it down much faster, and in turn I give him my attention that much sooner...if he vamps back up, I stop and simply stop giving him attention until he tones it back.

    Won't say it's perfect or even doing it properly, just [for me] it's a lot less trying than before.
     
  7. Elrohwen

    Elrohwen Active Member

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    I agree with those who said he's probably getting more amped up while you're asking him to settle, and then when you open the crate he explodes out. Watson does this at the door - he will wait patiently, even look bored, but as soon as you open it he flings himself out at top speed, hitting the end of the leash.

    I think you need to give him something to do once you've opened the door. Leslie McDevitt recommends teaching dogs to orient to you as soon as the crate is opened. She will stand off the side and call the dog to her and ask for focus. She also does this when going through any door (like at a class, or a store, or coming out of her house, etc).
     
  8. DJEtzel

    DJEtzel New Member

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    Patton does this.

    whenever I can, I try to play tug with him when he comes out, or obedience, right away. It's helping a little bit. Slowly but surely.
     
  9. HayleyMarie

    HayleyMarie Like a bat outa' hell

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    Thanks guys for all the help.

    I've decided to start with the ignore tactic when I come home and when I let him out of his kennel. So far it seems to be working when I come home and he is already out of his kennel.

    The real test will be when I am home alone and I get him out of his kennel. Now that is the real **** show!
     

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