7 Lies of Homeschooling.

Discussion in 'The Fire Hydrant' started by nikkiluvsu15, May 31, 2012.

  1. CaliTerp07

    CaliTerp07 New Member

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    Right, but if you have questions during the video, you have no one to ask unless your tutor is watching the videos with you. That would be cost prohibitive here, I think, where private tutoring runs around $75/hour for middle school math! I'd guess it's even higher at the high school level. Still cheaper than private school though, I suppose.

    (I scored perfect on my SAT's (and the SAT II's) too, but I don't think that alone qualifies me to teach high school math! The SAT is capped at a 9th grade level, I think.)

    Don't get me wrong, there are a lot of issues with public school. If I had a motivated kid one on one, I could teach them a year's worth of math material in 4-5 months instead of 9, thanks to the yahoos in the classroom who slow things down. I still think it's a better model for the vast majority of math learners though, unless the parent (or other teacher) is well-versed and competent in math/physics/chem/etc.
     
  2. Greenmagick

    Greenmagick New Member

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    ahh, but the normal reading age is 7....force it too early and you can ruin it for the child. Just playing devil's advocate. I know children who were forced to learn early (homeschooled and traditionally schooled) and because it was hard and a struggle, they resent it and took a really long time to learn to read for enjoyment (if they ever got to that). I also know of children who didnt start til 7,8,9 but were immediately reading WAY above their grade level, comprehending it and more importantly enjoying it. Not everyone learns at the same pace...my son was walking at 9 months, my daughter at 13. There is no set age that things magically happen.

    Definitely not for everyone, but bad examples exist in both places. Schools are also changing more and more....some now dont even allow talking at lunch and there are precious few moment for "socialization".
     
  3. nikkiluvsu15

    nikkiluvsu15 Wild At Heart

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    I did have my mom to ask questions, if I needed too. As well as my older siblings! :) But, honestly, the videos I used were SO good about explaining it. Like I said, it isn't for everyone. My siblings used it as well and they also thought it was good.

    I only used my tutor for the ACT test, so it wasn't very cost prohibitive for us. I can see where it can be for others though.

    Oh, I don't think scoring perfect on the SAT/ACT qualifies you either. I was just throwing that in there because I had never met anyone who had scored perfect before :p
     
  4. sparks19

    sparks19 I'd rather be at Disney

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    It doesn't seem to affect university application in the least. Parents know the same in homeschool as they do in public school or private school. Testing, knowing the material, and here in PA you work with a mediator every year (usually you find a mediator you like and they are your mediator for your entire homeschool "career"). They come in and administer testing, you keep work examples and work completed and curriculum stuff etc etc and they look it over and help you out if you ask for help because many of them have been doing this for many years with many families. One of the more popular mediators that many people in one of our co ops use is a former public school teacher, turned homeschooler, turned mediator.

    how can one person teach everything... that I'll answer in the next part of my post.

    Co ops are not the only viable way but I do love our co op and plan to join a second co op this year when Hannah starts kindergarten (which she would not be allowed to do this year in public or private school because her birthday falls after the start of September... so she would not be allowed to start kindergarten until next year)

    You can't imagine learning from video but other students thrive with that sort of learning. That's the beauty of homeschooling. What doesn't work for you might work GREAT for someone else and what does work for you might not work for someone else. In homeschooling you get the option to learn the best way possible for you. If a student tries the video way and it doesn't work... they are free to try the next option.

    There are SO many resources available to homeschoolers that there is almost certainly a way to teach them that subject in a way that works for them. There are videos, there are online classes, there are classes they can take within the community (in lancaster there are all kinds of teachers that run homeschool classrooms for certain subjects), there are classes through the local college here they can take... the list goes on and on and on. The resources are endless.

    Homeschooling when done incorrectly can be terrible... but when done right it can be Oh so amazing.

    I know it's hard to imagine but hundreds (if not thousands) of kids in Lancaster county alone do it every single year and THRIVE.

    there are endless resources and an incredible support system here.

    and the best part... if you find homeschooling isn't working for you or your child you are FREE to switch them into public or private school, or charter homeschool, or any other number of options. It's not "once a homeschooler always a homeschooler" you can start out in public school and switch to homeschooling and vice versa.

    The freedom to individualize learning so that child learns in a way that works best for them. By the time they get to algebra and calculus it's likely the child and the parent have a very good handle on how that child learns best and if you try something and it doesn't work... change it :)

    It's a beautiful thing.

    As for the socialization thing mentioned earlier in the thread, I think that's a personality issue and not a strictly homeschool vs public school issue. Hannah is no slouch when it comes to being social. She is extremely social with ALL ages of people from baby to adult. That's her personality and I nurture it as best I can.
     
  5. *blackrose

    *blackrose "I'm kupo for kupo nuts!"

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    ...I was reading in preschool. ROFL Now I know why my mom thought that was great!

    I was home schooled from grade 3 to freshman level, then went to a very small private school for three years of high school (I'm talking there were maybe twelve of us in my graduating class).

    I'm currently about ready to graduate Purdue University with a BS - being home schooled and then going to a very small private school didn't effect my application process at all. :)
     
  6. Lizmo

    Lizmo Water Junkie

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    Like I said, I believe that is the way it is done in the state I reside. Each state is different, and no, you do not have to homesschool and go to a particular church. There are a few churches in town that are set up to 'cover' homeschoolers in our area. If you wanted more information on this subject, Homeschool Legal Defense Association, is a great place to check out.

    Aside from what Sparks as said, some choose to take higher level math via dual-enrollment from college teachers.
     
  7. sparks19

    sparks19 I'd rather be at Disney

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    Another good resource I disn't think of and have no experience with yet
     
  8. Jules

    Jules Magic, motherf@%$*#!

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    I couldn't imagine being homeschooled.... But I also had an awesome school experience, socially and academically. But schools are a lot different in Germany.... I still secretly hope that we'll end up there should we have a child eventually.

    I wish there were more rules and regulations with it. While people on here seem to have good experiences and appear well-rounded, it's also clear that that's because of great parent input. I've had a family over at my house to pick up a bunch of landscaping river rocks... And that lady was chatting up a storm with me. She couldn't speak 3 sentences without any grave grammatical errors, but told me as proud as possible that she honeschools her 6 (!!) children. All of them were your typical stereotype of what you think a homeschooled kid acts like. Didn't say anything at all, didn't hold eye contact, just very very awkward. And folks like that scare me and I wish someone would look over their shoulder to ensure that these kids get the fundamentals they need to succeed in life.
     
  9. nikkiluvsu15

    nikkiluvsu15 Wild At Heart

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    Sparks - awesome post! :) I tried to quote parts I agreed with, but I pretty much agree with everything you said.

    Yes, dual-enrolling at the college is so great. I loved doing that my junior/senior years!

    I didn't take my math there, but I know of quite a few home schooled students who did take their math at the local community college. It is a win-win situation because you get credit for both high school and college!
     
  10. blue

    blue Jerk.

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    Only dues paying members of the NEA should be teaching.

    My dad used to teach high school and my stepmom is a President of English at a large university. They left the education of my little sister in the hands of professionals of the NEA in the public education system.

    Obviously only professionals should be doing the teaching.

    Obvious troll is trolling.
     
  11. Kimbers

    Kimbers New Member

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    Really?! I remember in preschool, we were told to write stories as a sort of benchmark each month or so. Admittedly, most were things like "I play football in the summer" or "the spider lays eggs. The eggs hatch baby spiders."
    My preschool memories aren't at all in order, but I'm pretty sure you read before you write.
     
  12. houlahoops

    houlahoops New Member

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    I was homeschooled for two years after an altercation in defense of my sister got out of hand (my ma pulled a fast one: "You can't expel her, she's homeschooled!").

    I do agree that, done right and with an amenable kid, it can be fabulous. The first year for me was just fine. I learned quickly and could direct my own education. I was not struggling academically in a public school setting, but I loved the specialization that homeschooled allowed.

    However, I am a very competitive person, as well as someone who thrives on external feedback. There is only so much I could get out of my mother's praise and the supposed personal satisfaction that I was earning. I started to become belligerent about finishing assignments on time, and not at all driven to work hard. I could pass the exams with very little effort, and so I saw the tests as my only motivating force--a mediocre drive at best.

    I chose to return to school when I felt that I was goofing off more often than not, and I found that even with my regular activities with other homeschoolers, the shyness that I had had during my preliminary schooling had multiplied. I was completely socially incompetent and paralyzed at the idea of interacting with other students. I got in several more (less serious) fights before I slowly was able to reintegrate.

    Not questioning anyone's opinion here, just sharing my own experience. Overall, I'm glad that I wasn't in school during the time that I was homeschooled, if only because I was not transitioning well. But if I could change anything...well to be honest I think I would have thrived in a private school setting (but who wouldn't!).

    That said, I love the video! =)
     
  13. Greenmagick

    Greenmagick New Member

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    Sorry I should clarify, developmentally 7 is about when most children are ready to read. Some are WAY earlier and some are later:). Schools are pushed to do it on the earlier side and because of classroom setting they all need to be reading by a certain time.
     
  14. Kimbers

    Kimbers New Member

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    That makes more sense.
    And yeah, schools are encouraged to push the kids too fast. My sister had the same teacher for preschool and the requirements for graduation changed drastically from the time she went through it to five years later when I did.
     
  15. sparks19

    sparks19 I'd rather be at Disney

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    I just want to add that through my experiences helping out with some of the high school kids classes in our co op... These kids are all very normal teens lol. I always just have to laugh to myself whenever I experience a class with the older kids. Somethings never change lol. Kids group together in select groups, the boys are always laughing and goofing off and playing jokes on each other, the girls are often a little more reserved but giggle and talk about boys just the same... So on and so forth lol. It's funny to observe them and laugh a little about how it was exactly the same when I was their age.

    As for our schooling plan at home. We are pretty traditional. Our weeks are very structured. Hannah thrives on structure. Has been that way since she was an infant. Days that were "business as usual" when she was a baby were the easiest. That being said she is also quite adaptable. If plans change she just goes with the flow but she thrives on the familiar so she often brings along a little something from home (usually a minnie mouse) for that familiar comfort. She likes to know what we are doing each day of each week lol. She asks ten times a day "what's tomorrow". I tell her what day of the week and she will tell me what we usually have scheduled for that day. If it's an "off day" we try to plan something so she knows what to expect te next day. She prefers structure and prior planning which is a lesson for ME lol because I am not naturally that way

    Bedtime routine has been the same for ages. Brush teeth, potty, change into PJ's, read a book or two, say a prayer, goodnight. She doesn't like to deviate from that lol. She even likes the toothbrushing to go the same. Count to ten in german and spanish for the bottom, count in french and japanese for the top and the alphabet in french and sign for the fronts. If you switch it up... She calls you on it lol
     
  16. Sweet72947

    Sweet72947 Squishy face

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    On the not reading till 7 thing, I would say that is NOT the norm. When you are 7, you are in second grade. I remember reading stuff in class in first grade, like the "see spot run" type stuff, and we learned our letters and wrote stuff too.

    I think I would have liked homeschooling for my elementary-middle school years, but I'm glad I went to public high school. If I hadn't, I wouldn't have met two of my best friends. :)
     
  17. Greenmagick

    Greenmagick New Member

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    When I was in school, we started to learn in first grade, basics like see spot run (more memorization than anything really). By second grade we were "reading". Now often its a requirement to pass kindergarten.

    This is NOT to say early reading is bad, but there are cons to it for some kids. In a school setting, when kids need to read directions on worksheets etc, its needed. I would NOT in any way be worried if a 7 year old could not yet read as long as other signs werent pointing to a problem.

    My daughter could sit through whole chapter books at age 3...including things like The Hobbit, Hitchikers Guide, etc., and actually comprehend them. She knew the plot, the characters, etc. She eats stuff like that up....but now at 6 she still cant "read". I am not worried, she shows all other signs of getting it, it will click for her soon. Just like my son was a late talker and totally caught up (and probably has surpassed the general vocabulary of most 4 year olds) and I have doubt that when she is ready, it will click and she will "catch up".

    And yes, learning letter, how to recognize certain words, spell them etc is way different from actual reading IMO. Many schools do it earlier, from what I have read though developmentally the average age a child is really ready is around 7
    (And yes, I TOTAlly understand that there are things like dyslexia and the like. Thats why I am saying if all other signs are pointing to things being ok, relax and let them figure it out with you guiding them along)
     

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