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  #11  
Old 05-03-2013, 11:08 AM
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Ask his dr about it and see if he would say he needs one.

I just found out recently some of the insurance companies are now paying for them. I am sure it depends which one you have. I have heard it takes a while though.

A coworkers daughter just put her dobe through training and he can detect her seizures, bring her pills and water, and all kinds of other stuff. She worked with a program near her in I think north carolina. She is very lucky that he can detect her seizures since thats not really something you can train.


I have heard of younger kids getting them for autism because it helps them come out of their shell.
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  #12  
Old 05-03-2013, 02:00 PM
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I like the sounds of a companion dog knowing some helpful tasks more so than an actual service dog. I do t think at anywhere in the near or distant future he will require, if ever, a full blown service dog. But teaching a companion dog some helpful skills see a to be a great idea for us.

Thanks everyone!
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  #13  
Old 05-03-2013, 06:42 PM
Saeleofu Saeleofu is offline
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I have heard of younger kids getting them for autism because it helps them come out of their shell.
That's not what a service dog is for, though. That can be done with a pet or a skilled companion dog. A service dog is to provide independence through trained tasks. Not to be a friend or to socialize a kid - those are side effects of a service dog that can be done with any dog.
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  #14  
Old 05-03-2013, 10:10 PM
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Won't go into too much detail, but if anyone wants to know ask me privately.

I've been really looking into a service dog in the future as well whether it be that I train Cricket (provided she ends up being a good fit and learns the tasks, etc) or a separate dog. I'm still talking more about it with my pyschiatrist and I need to talk to a doctor more about it. Already have a trainer that is experienced training PSDs that is willing to work with me (and knows Cricket really well) if it is a route I end up going. It's been something that's been on my mind for quite a few years and my situation has gotten so much worse.

Right now I'm still learning more, researching the laws, etc. I definitely agree with holding off on really considering an SD for Briggs until he is older, but until then having a pet dog trained to help out the way Bandit helps out would be great.

The servicedog forum that was mentioned has been my go to for a lot of what I've been learning about service dogs. Definitely recommend checking it out.
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  #15  
Old 05-03-2013, 11:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saeleofu View Post
That's not what a service dog is for, though. That can be done with a pet or a skilled companion dog. A service dog is to provide independence through trained tasks. Not to be a friend or to socialize a kid - those are side effects of a service dog that can be done with any dog.
Hmmm. Lots of people with autism have service dogs. They don't need them to turn off lights or let them know when thy can safely cross the street. Person may be a mess and they bring meds drink blanket etc. a dog for the family is not going to be allowed shopping or on a cruise. Or they shouldn't be anyway. I like the idea of certified dogs personally. Supposedly the cost is over ten grand when ins pays. They wouldn't do it if it wasn't needed.

If it helps the child at a younger age why wait? I know some have said the dog is what keeps the kid able to sit through class or jus focus when it's next to them. Really who cares what the label is.
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  #16  
Old 05-03-2013, 11:45 PM
Saeleofu Saeleofu is offline
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Originally Posted by joce View Post
Hmmm. Lots of people with autism have service dogs.
I know lots of people with autism have service dogs. I have autism. I have a service dog. I am very aware of what my service dog does for me, and what they do for people with autism in general. Bringing a blanket is NOT a task. For most people, bringing meds and a drink is not a task (it's really not as common of a tasks as most people think, though it is a common bonus). As I said, my autism service dog does guide and balance/mobility work, finds bathrooms/exits/entrances/cars/home/etc, and some deep pressure tasks, etc. with several bonuses. I'm really NOT the person to be lecturing to about how service dogs can be used for different disabilities. I KNOW.

A pet dog is not allowed on a cruise or in a store, because it is a PET. A service dog is meant to provide independence. Not to be a security blanket, babysitter, or a source of entertainment. It's not appropriate for a younger child because the child cannot handle the dog on its own yet. Until the child is fully capable of providing for the dogs needs during its working time (and ideally is the one feeding and caring for the dog all the time), the child is too young. The service dog works for its disabled handler, not for the kid's parents. If the dog is not task trained, there is no reason to be taking it everywhere.

Insurance doesn't usually pay for a service dog. The only time I've heard of insurance paying is when it's a veteran, and then it's the special veteran insurance that does it (I really forget the name of it, which is awful, because I've told me dad about using it as an option for him before...). A service dog costs in excess of $10,000 to train and place, but the handler should NOT be paying that much. Under $2500 is normal. Anything over $5000 makes me suspicious. Anything over $10000 makes me automatically think scam. Why? Reputable programs are able to raise money and get donations to help fund the training and placement of the dogs.

No reputable program is going to give a dog to a toddler or tie a dog to a kid. Those that do generally don't put as much training into a dog as they should, then sell it for tens of thousands of dollars. Because kids are cute and people pay for cute.

Here's a video of what a tether dog REALLY does. Keep watching through to the end. It gets really bad. That dog does NOT deserve that sort of treatment, and it's not helping the kid any either. It's parents being lazy.

http://youtu.be/yRNyRi3BOk4


And then here are some videos of what real autism service dogs do:

http://youtu.be/EwPIgChIChE

http://youtu.be/WiSB-AFnWHc

It's pretty simple to see the difference.
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  #17  
Old 05-04-2013, 01:11 AM
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While possibly not as common as the babysitter dogs I have seen medical alert dogs for young children that I am very comfortable with(as if that even matters) even if they live outside of your definition of providing independence and being inappropriate unless the child can do all of the work. They have and continue to not only better but save those children's lives, I doubt the parents were stressed about labels when seeking assistance.

I really do think that is a great logic, particularly about not using dogs as a tie down for children, but I wouldn't write off dogs and their help for children under the age of being the sole caregiver entirely.
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  #18  
Old 05-04-2013, 08:43 AM
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Disagree. But your not going to see why.


And I'm a nurse. I am seeing the insurance company paying for the dogs. I know one was caresource. Others have to.
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  #19  
Old 05-04-2013, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdrianneIsabel View Post
While possibly not as common as the babysitter dogs I have seen medical alert dogs for young children that I am very comfortable with(as if that even matters) even if they live outside of your definition of providing independence and being inappropriate unless the child can do all of the work. They have and continue to not only better but save those children's lives, I doubt the parents were stressed about labels when seeking assistance.

I really do think that is a great logic, particularly about not using dogs as a tie down for children, but I wouldn't write off dogs and their help for children under the age of being the sole caregiver entirely.
The thing is, service dogs DO NOT give children independence. CHILDREN do not have independence, because they're CHILDREN. They're constantly under supervision when in public (or at least they should be), whether it's parents, guardians, babysitters, teachers, etc., some adult is always supervising in public. So IMO, I can't think of one situation where a child will not be able to cope in public without a dog helping, considering he constantly has an available adult to help.

In addition, dogs in public are a nuisance. Yes, even well behaved dogs. I know people who are phobic of dogs and avoid going to pet stores and other places where dogs are allowed because of that; but they can't help going to the grocery store. Why should my friend have a panic attack every time she goes to the grocery store, just so that your 5-year-old feels more comfortable? I know people who have the same problem because they're allergic to dogs. I know businesses who are seriously inconvenienced because of dogs. If the dog is there to help someone who truely needs the help, that's one thing, and that's why there are laws protecting those people. But is it worth all the trouble so that a child, who does not have or need independence and is accompanied by a capable adult, can bring their dog in?

BTW, I'm a professional service dog trainer. My organization trains dogs for adults with disabilities - hearing dogs for people who are deaf and hard of hearing, and service dogs for people with mobility disabilities.
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  #20  
Old 05-04-2013, 12:51 PM
Saeleofu Saeleofu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joce View Post
Disagree. But your not going to see why.

Disagree with what? What tasks an autism service dog does? Or the legal definition of a service dog? There are laws governing this sort of thing. It's not a free-for-all, though some people are trying to make it into one.
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